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Womens Facial Skincare - UK - May 2016

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : May 2016

Category :

Skincare

No. of Pages : N/A

The women’s facial skincare category has seen slow and steady growth in recent years, with the prestige sector driving growth in 2015; as employment rates rise, women are showing a greater willingness to spend on premium products. Whilst brands are promoting ageless beauty campaigns in 2015, focusing on NPD for older skin concerns will really drive the market.

Table of Content

Overview

What you need to know
Products covered in this report

Executive Summary

A market showing steady growth
Figure 1: Best- and worst-case forecast of UK value sales of women’s facial skincare products 2010-20
Rise in employment could boost the category
Range extensions dominated in 2015
Figure 2: New product launches in the women’s facial skincare market, by launch type, January 2013-March 2016
Eye concerns are high
Figure 3: Skin concerns experienced in the last 12 months, March 2016
Use of products with natural ingredients is high
Figure 4: Changes in skincare habits in the last 12 months, March 2016
Price remains an important factor
Figure 5: Purchase habits of facial skincare products, March 2016
What we think

Issues and Insights

Mass market brands are struggling
The facts
The implications
What a product contains is more important than what it excludes
The facts
The implications
Adult acne could be a focus for the category
The facts
The implications

The Market – What You Need to Know

Prestige sector drives growth
Savvy shopping drives multiple grocers and discounters
Rise in employment could boost prestige sector
Promoting pro-age
You are what you eat

Market Size and Forecast

Slow and steady growth
Figure 6: UK retail value sales of women’s facial skincare products, 2010-20
Continued growth expected
Figure 7: Best- and worst-case forecast of UK value sales of women’s facial skincare products, 2010-20
Forecast methodology

Segment Performance

Prestige out-performs mass market
Figure 8: UK retail value sales of women’s facial skincare products, mass market vs prestige, 2014-15
Lips and eye care struggle
Figure 9: UK retail value sales of women’s mass market facial skincare products, by segment, 2014-15*

Channels to Market

Department stores boosted by prestige sector
Figure 10: UK retail value sales of women’s facial skincare products, by outlet type, 2014-15
Multiple grocers and discounters fare well

Market Drivers

Rise in employment presents opportunities
Figure 11: Employment and unemployment, by gender, 2010-20
Older population could boost the category
Figure 12: Trends in the age structure of the UK female population, 2010-20
Blurring boundaries in cosmetics and skincare
Figure 13: Usage occasions of face colour cosmetics, April 2015
Pro-ageing opportunities
Figure 14: Anti-ageing product usage amongst women, by age, July 2015
Detox skincare
Figure 15: Agreement with selected lifestyle statements, by age, July 2015
Internet as influencer
Figure 16: BPC online activities, October 2015

Key Players – What You Need to Know

Leading brands see decline in value
Innovation driven by range extensions
Eyes see little in NPD
Free-from claims have risen
Promoting ageless beauty
Face wash sees rise in advertising spend
Brand communication translates into brand image

Market Share

Micellar water launch keeps Simple at the top
Figure 17: UK retail value sales of women’s mass market facial skincare products, by brand, years ending January, 2015 and 2016
Olay to see range cuts
NIVEA posts strong sales
Lawsuits could impact brands in coming years

Launch Activity and Innovation

Range extensions rise in prominence in 2015
Figure 18: New product launches in the women’s facial skincare market, by launch type, January 2013-March 2016
2015: The year of micellar cleansers
Packaging opportunities
Eyes products see range extensions
Figure 19: New product launches in the women’s facial skincare market, by sub-category, January 2013-March 2016
Figure 20: Examples of range extensions for eye products, 2015
Fuller eyebrow trend driving eyebrow and lash innovation
Figure 21: Examples of lash and eyebrow products, 2015
Free-from claims see a rise
Figure 22: Fastest growing product positioning claims in the women’s facial skincare market, 2014-15
Locally produced
Whitening claims see a rise
Figure 23: Launches featuring whitening claims, 2015
Anti-acne sees a decline
Fragmented category
Figure 24: New product development in women’s facial skincare market, by top five ultimate companies and other, 2015

Brand Communication and Promotion

Outdoor advertising sees rise in focus
Figure 25: Recorded above-the-line, online display and direct mail total advertising expenditure on women’s facial skincare, by media type, January 2013-March 2016
Ageless beauty
Figure 26: Recorded above-the-line, online display and direct mail total advertising expenditure on women’s facial skincare, by top selling companies and other, 2015
Neutrogena aims to attract younger women
Photoshopping remains a point of conversation
Face wash sees the biggest rise in advertising
Figure 27: Recorded above-the-line, online display and direct mail total advertising expenditure on women’s facial skincare, by segment, January 2013-March 2016
Coverage/methodology clarification

Brand Research

Brand map
Figure 28: Attitudes towards and usage of selected brands, March 2016
Key brand metrics
Figure 29: Key metrics for selected brands, March 2016
Brand attitudes: Premium brands score well for quality
Figure 30: Attitudes, by brand, March 2016
Brand personality: Usage translated to accessibility
Figure 31: Brand personality – Macro image, March 2016
Olay maintains a classic image
Figure 32: Brand personality – Micro image, March 2016
Brand analysis
Simple brand associations are on par with brand equity
Figure 33: User profile of Simple, March 2016
Neutrogena is youthful
Figure 34: User profile of Neutrogena, March 2016
Garnier has an engaging image
Figure 35: User profile of Garnier, March 2016
Olay is trusted
Figure 36: User profile of Olay, March 2016
Clinique has a good reputation
Figure 37: User profile of Clinique, March 2016
Clarins is expert but over-hyped
Figure 38: User profile of Clarins, March 2016
La Roche-Posay is innovative
Figure 39: User profile of La Roche-Posay, March 2016
NUXE is socially responsible
Figure 40: User profile of NUXE, March 2016

The Consumer – What You Need to Know

Eye concerns could drive innovation
Acne in older women
Young women are using micellar water
Natural claims resonate more than free-from
Internet rises in influence
Price is key driver
Oils have low usage ratings

Skin Concerns

Women are concerned about their eyes
Figure 41: Skin concerns experienced in the last 12 months, March 2016
Skin concerns in young women may be caused by lifestyle
Figure 42: Selected skin concerns experienced regularly in the last 12 months, by oldest and youngest demographics, March 2016
Even older women experience occasional acne
Figure 43: Selected skin concerns experienced infrequently in the last 12 months, by those aged 35+, March 2016

Usage of Facial Skincare Products

Face wash and face soap are used by different women
Figure 44: Usage of facial cleansing products, by oldest and youngest demographics, March 2016
Micellar water usage high in young women
Figure 45: Usage of micellar water, by age, March 2016
Older women moisturise more
Figure 46: Usage of facial moisturising products, by oldest and youngest demographics, March 2016
Older women focus on eyes
Figure 47: Usage of facial treatment products, by oldest and youngest demographics, March 2016
Traditional face masks fare well
Sufferers of hyperpigmentation and sallow skin use a range of products
Figure 48: Usage of facial treatment products, by sufferers of hyperpigmentation and change in skin tone, March 2016

Changes in Skincare Habits

Natural is more important than free-from
Figure 49: Changes in skincare habits in the last 12 months, March 2016
Premium skincare sees a rise
Women are doing their own research
Figure 50: Changes in skincare habits relating to research in the last 12 months, by age, March 2016
Rise in use of pharmacy brands

Purchase of Facial Skincare Products

Low prices are a key driver
Figure 51: Purchase habits of facial skincare products, March 2016
Creating in-store experiences
The process before buying
Health and beauty retailers are the most popular destination
Figure 52: Places of purchase of facial skincare products, March 2016
Shoppers at health and beauty retailers seek advice
Figure 53: Purchase habits of women who purchase facial skincare from health and beauty retailers, March 2016
Older women shop at department stores
Figure 54: Purchase of facial skincare products at department stores and discount retailers, by age, March 2016

Attitudes towards Format Types

Cream and lotion have universal appeal
Figure 55: Correspondence analysis – Attitudes towards format types, February 2016
Oils rate low for usage
Figure 56: Attitudes towards format types, February 2016
Serums are comparable to lotions

Appendix – Data Sources, Abbreviations and Supporting Information

Data sources
Abbreviations
Fan chart forecast
Brand research
Brand map
Correspondence analysis
Attitudes towards format types
Correspondence analysis methodology

Appendix – Key Players

Figure 57: New product launches in the women’s eye care segment, by launch type, January 2013-March 2016
Figure 58: Recorded above-the-line, online display and direct mail total advertising expenditure on women’s facial skincare, by media type, January 2013-March 2016

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