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WOMEN'S FACIAL SKINCARE - UK - JULY 2018

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Jul 2018

Category :

Cosmetic

No. of Pages : N/A

The women’s facial skincare category has seen strong value growth year-on year despite a decline in NPD, suggesting that advertising and marketing messages are resonating with women. Penetration of products has increased in the last 12 months, indicating that women are adding multiple steps to their regime. However, there are signs that education could help grow the market further; despite high ingredient awareness knowledge about ingredients remains low, and there is still confusion around the use of SPF

Table of contents
OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Products covered in this Report
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The market
A category going from strength to strength
Figure 1: Best- and worst-case forecast of the UK value sales of women’s facial skincare, 2013-23
Companies and brands
Simple and L’Oréal lead market share
Figure 2: UK retail value sales of mass market women’s facial skincare, by brand, year ending May 2018
NPD shows a decline
Figure 3: New product launches in the women’s facial skincare market, January 2015-April 2018
The consumer
Penetration of cleansing products is on the rise
Figure 4: Facial cleansing products used in the last 12 months, March 2017 and May 2018
Night cream sees increased penetration
Figure 5: Facial moisturiser products used in the last 12 months, March 2017 and May 2018
Increased penetration of treatments suggests widening repertoires
Figure 6: Facial treatment products used in the last 12 months, March 2017 and May 2018
Sun exposure is the biggest external factor impacting skin appearance
Figure 7: External factors impacting the appearance of facial skin, May 2018
Sleep is an issue
Figure 8: Internal factors impacting the appearance of facial skin, May 2018
High awareness, low knowledge
Figure 9: Facial skincare ingredient awareness, May 2018
Price is the biggest purchase influencer
Figure 10: Purchase factors for facial skincare products, May 2018
Use of SPF is high
Figure 11: Usage of SPF products in facial skincare routine, by youngest and oldest age groups, May 2018
Confusion on sun protection
Figure 12: Attitudes towards SPF and facial skincare, May 2018
What we think
ISSUES AND INSIGHTS
SPF skincare still has a long way to go
The facts
The implications
The category fares well despite NPD being down
The facts
The implications
Women are buying more, even though knowledge is still low
The facts
The implications
THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Strong growth in value
Mass market cleansers and eye care show strong value sales
Specialist stores showed strong sales in 2017
The teen market presents opportunities
‘Anti-ageing’ may no longer resonate
Natural and organic sector remains confusing
MARKET SIZE AND FORECAST
Strong value growth in 2017
Figure 13: UK retail value sales of women’s facial skincare, at current and constant prices, 2013-23
Continued growth predicted
Figure 14: Best- and worst-case forecast of the UK value sales of women’s facial skincare, 2013-23
Forecast methodology
MARKET SEGMENTATION
Mass market cleansers and eye care see significant rise
Figure 15: UK retail value sales of mass market women’s facial skincare, by segment, years ending February, 2017 and 2018
Mass shows growth whilst prestige is in decline
Figure 16: UK retail value sales of women’s facial skincare, mass vs prestige, years ending February, 2017 and 2018
CHANNELS TO MARKET
Specialist stores fare well in 2017
Figure 17: UK retail value sales of women’s facial skincare, by outlet type, 2016-17
Boots remains most popular destination
MARKET DRIVERS
Opportunities for the teen market
Figure 18: Trends in the age structure of the female UK population, 2012-22
Rethinking ‘anti-ageing’
Financial situations may change
Figure 19: Trends in how respondents would describe their financial situation, May 2017 and May 2018
Bodycare blurs the boundaries
Figure 20: Attitudes towards facial vs body skin, January 2018
Personalising skincare
The sun protection factor
Figure 21: Attitudes towards sun protection products, September 2017
Clearing the confusion in the natural and organic category
Figure 22: Attitudes towards natural/organic beauty and personal care products, September 2017
Holiday beauty is important
Facial treatments in salons is on the decline
COMPANIES AND BRANDS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
L’Oréal sees strong value growth
NPD sees a decline
Botanical/herbal remains the top claim
Digital advertising sees greater focus
Helping women navigate skincare
Women are proud of mass market brands
MARKET SHARE
Simple and L’Oréal lead market share
Figure 23: UK retail value sales of mass market women’s facial skincare, by brand, years ending May, 2017 and 2018
LAUNCH ACTIVITY AND INNOVATION
Decline in NPD
Figure 24: New product launches in the women’s facial skincare market, January 2015-April 2018
Figure 25: Examples of NPD in eye and lip masks, 2017
High-end products in lip care
Figure 26: High end NPD for lips, 2017
Little in new formulations
Figure 27: New product launches in the women’s facial skincare market, by launch type, January 2015-April 2018
Figure 28: Moisturising lip launches, 2017 and 2018
Treading the line between skincare and colour cosmetics
Botanical/herbal remains top claim
Figure 29: Top claims for new product launches in the women’s facial skincare market in 2017, 2016-17
Rise in vegan, halal and ethnic claims
Figure 30: Percentage change in vegan, halal and ethnic claims, 2016-17
Environmental claims see a boost
Protecting from the environment
Estée Lauder leads NPD
Figure 31: New product launches in the women’s facial skincare market, by ultimate companies and other, 2017
Cult beauty brands that hit the UK
ADVERTISING AND MARKETING ACTIVITY
Advertising spend sees little change
Figure 32: Total recorded above-the-line, online and direct mail advertising expenditure on women’s facial skincare, by media type, January 2015-April 2018
P&G leads advertising spend
Figure 33: Total recorded above-the-line, online display and direct mail advertising expenditure on women’s facial skincare, by ultimate company and other, 2017
Brands look to present more high-tech guidance
Bringing help in the home
Nielsen Ad Intel coverage
BRAND RESEARCH
Brand map
Figure 34: Attitudes towards and usage of selected brands, April 2018
Key brand metrics
Figure 35: Key metrics for selected brands, April 2018
Brand attitudes: Mass market brands inspire pride
Figure 36: Attitudes, by brand, April 2018
Brand personality: Premium brands are exclusive
Figure 37: Brand personality – macro image, April 2018
Simple brand considered natural
Figure 38: Brand personality – micro image, April 2018
Brand analysis
Liz Earle has low associations with brand metrics
Figure 39: User profile of Liz Earle, April 2018
Simple is considered ethical
Figure 40: User profile of Simple, April 2018
Boots appeals to older women
Figure 41: User profile of Boots No7, April 2018
Garnier is considered fun
Figure 42: User profile of Garnier, April 2018
Clinique appeals to older women
Figure 43: User profile of Clinique, April 2018
Olay instils pride
Figure 44: User profile of Olay, April 2018
Neutrogena is innovative
Figure 45: User profile of Neutrogena, April 2018
THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Penetration of facial skincare is on the rise
Sun exposure is the biggest external influencer
Sleep is the biggest internal influencer
Ingredient awareness is high but knowledge is low
Price is the most important purchase influencer
Use of SPF is high - but so is confusion
USAGE OF FACIAL CLEANSING PRODUCTS
Cleansing becomes more important
Figure 46: Facial cleansing products used in the last 12 months, March 2017 and May 2018
Figure 47: Quotes and image related to cleansing, May 2018
Wipes sometimes used instead of cleanser
Figure 48: Image and quotes related to usage of wipes, May 2018
Moving away from single-step cleansing routines
Figure 49: Facial cleansing repertoires, May 2018
USAGE OF FACIAL CARING PRODUCTS
Widening repertoires in the caring segment
Figure 50: Repertoire of facial caring products (moisturisers and treatments) used in the last 12 months, March 2017 and May 2018
More focus on night routines
Figure 51: Facial moisturiser products used in the last 12 months, March 2017 and May 2018
Day cream usage peaks in over-65s
Figure 52: Usage of day, night and eye cream, by age, May 2018
Figure 53: Images and quotes relating to moisturising, May 2018
Masks remain popular
Figure 54: Facial treatment products used in the last 12 months, March 2017 and May 2018
Figure 55: Image and quotes related to using face masks, May 2018
FACTORS IMPACTING SKIN APPEARANCE
Sun exposure is the biggest external culprit
Figure 56: External factors impacting the appearance of facial skin, May 2018
Figure 57: Image and quote relating to light from devices impacting the appearance of skin, May 2018
Even those in small towns worry about pollution
Figure 58: Agreement with pollution impacting facial skin appearance, by area, May 2018
Figure 59: Image and quotes relating to pollution impacting the appearance of skin, May 2018
Cold weather impacts older people more, hot weather impacts younger
Figure 60: Agreement with hot and cold weather impacting facial skin appearance, by age, May 2018
Figure 61: Image and quotes relating to the impact of hot and cold weather on skin appearance, May 2018
Dust concern may impact usage of cleansers
Figure 62: Usage of cleansing balm and cleansing oil/gel amongst women who agree that dust impacts facial skin appearance, May 2018
Sleep is the biggest internal influencer
Figure 63: Internal factors impacting the appearance of facial skin, May 2018
Figure 64: Image and quotes relating to sleep as a factor influencing skin appearance, May 2018
Impact of hormones changes by age
Diet is a bigger factor for younger women, water is bigger for older women
Figure 65: Agreement with diet and water consumption impacting the appearance of facial skin, by age, May 2018
Figure 66: Image and quotes relating to diet impacting the appearance of skin, May 2018
INGREDIENT AWARENESS
High awareness but low knowledge when it comes to ingredients
Figure 67: Facial skincare ingredient awareness, May 2018
The acids are well known
PURCHASE OF FACIAL SKINCARE PRODUCTS
Price and brand name are universally important
Figure 68: Purchase factors for facial skincare products, May 2018
Young women look for reviews
Figure 69: Good reviews/recommendations as an important factor when buying facial skincare products, by age, May 2018
Ingredients are more important with age
Figure 70: Ingredients and certification as important factors when buying facial skincare products, by age, May 2018
Halal and vegan claims appeal to desire for cruelty-free
USE OF FACIAL SKINCARE WITH SPF
Use of moisturiser with SPF is high
Figure 71: Usage of SPF products in facial skincare routine, by youngest and oldest age groups, May 2018
Confusion in the sector
Figure 72: Attitudes towards SPF and facial skincare, May 2018
Young women concerned about SPF products not suiting skin
Figure 73: Agreement with SPF products being heavy, causing spots or skin sensitivity, amongst 16-24s, May 2018
APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES, ABBREVIATIONS AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION
Abbreviations
Consumer research methodology
Figure 74: Image bank for facial skincare routines, May 2018
Figure 75: Image bank for factors impacting appearance of facial skin, May 2018
Forecast methodology

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