866-997-4948(US-Canada Toll Free)

Sustainable Lifestyles - Brazil - August 2016

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Aug 2016

Category :

Lifestyle

No. of Pages : N/A

Brazilians are more conscious about the negative impacts their actions could have on the environment. While they are demanding more sustainable actions from companies, they are also cash-strapped and in many cases not willing to pay more for green/ethical products or looking for extra benefits that justifies the higher price of many of these products.

Table of Content

Overview

What you need to know
Definition

Executive Summary

The consumer
Recyclable packaging the leading type of product purchased
Figure 1: Purchases of sustainable products, June 2016
Higher interest in sustainable products when price and quality matches standard variety
Figure 2: Green/ethical considerations, July 2016
Females try to recycle more than males
Figure 3: Attitudes toward green/ethical, June 2016
Good for the environment: main motivator
Figure 4: Motivations to purchase sustainable/environmentally friendly products, June 2016
What we think

Issues and Insights

How to convince lower income consumer to buy greener products
The facts
The implications
Durability: an important factor for ethical/green buyers
The facts
The implications
Making sustainable practices visible to consumers who cook at home
The facts
The implications

The Market – What You Need to Know

The 2015 spike on energy bills
Food prices drive up inflation
Millions of Brazilians suffering with unemployment and lower incomes
Selective waste collection program still rare in Brazilian cities

Market Drivers

Energy prices skyrocketed in 2015
Food prices drive up inflation on July 2016
Figure 5: Monthly IPCA rate, August 2015-July 2016
Unemployment reaches a record of 11.4 million Brazilians
Figure 6: Unemployment rate in moving quarters, 2015 and 2016
Recycling rates thanks to garbage collector cooperatives
Figure 7: Cities with and without selective waste collection in Brazil, in %, 2014

The Consumer – What You Need to Know

Energy-efficient products: more appealing to males
Charity and animal welfare targeting females aged 25-34
Quality: an important factor for food and drink ethical buyers
Males want incentives to recycle
Consumers 55+ tend to look for companies’ good actions
Targeting consumers 35-44 with waste reduction initiatives

The Consumer – Purchases of Sustainable Products

Recyclable packaging the leading type of product purchased
Figure 8: Purchases of sustainable products, June 2016
Figure 9: Launches of products* with environmental/ethical claims, by claim category, 2014-July 2016
Males more likely to buy energy-efficient products
Figure 10: Purchases of energy-efficient products, by gender, June 2016
Figure 11: Purchases of energy-efficient products, by age groups of males, June 2016
Seniors search for ingredients less harmful to the environment
Figure 12: Purchases of products that do not contain ingredients which are harmful to the environment, by age group, June 2016
Females 25-34 most likely to focus on charity and animal welfare
Figure 13: Agreement with purchases of “products that include a donation to charity” and “products that are not tested in animals,” by age and gender, June 2016

The Consumer – Green/Ethical Considerations

Higher interest in sustainable products when price and quality matches standard variety
Figure 14: Green/ethical considerations, July 2016
Quality matters for food and drink ethical buyers
Males 25-34: willing to pay more for a green dining experience
Figure 15: Agreement with the consideration “the ethical/environmentally friendly product/service has a higher price and is of the same quality as standard ones” in food and drink out of home purchases, by age group and gender, July 2016

The Consumer – Attitudes toward Green/Ethical

Females try to recycle more than males
Figure 16: Attitudes toward green/ethical, June 2016
Figure 17: Agreement with the statement “I try to recycle as much as possible,” by gender, June 2016
While males look for more incentives to recycle
Figure 18: Agreement with the statement “I would recycle more if there was more of an incentive (eg cash back, loyalty points, discounts),” by gender and age group, June 2016
Bans on plastic bags are stimulating the use of own bags when shopping
Figure 19: Agreement with the statement “I use my own bags when I go shopping,” by city, June 2016
Consumers over 55 tend to look for company´s good actions
Figure 20: Agreement with the statement “I prefer to buy from companies that give something back to society,” by age group, June 2016

The Consumer – Motivations to Purchase Sustainable Products

Good for the environment: main motivator
Figure 21: Motivations to purchase sustainable/environmentally friendly products, June 2016
Waste reduction: targeting consumers 35-44
Figure 22: Agreement with “I do not like to waste” as a motivation to purchase sustainable/environmentally friendly products, by age group, June 2016
Half of consumers feel good about preserving the environment
Males: more inclined to set a good example for children
Figure 23: Agreement with “I want to set a good example for my children” as a motivation to purchase sustainable/environmentally friendly products, by gender, June 2016

Appendix – Abbreviations

Abbreviations

List of Table

NA

Make an enquiry before buying this Report

Please fill the enquiry form below.

  • Full Name *
  • Your Email *
  • Job Title *
  • Company *
  • Phone No. * (Pls. Affix Country Code)
  • Message
  • Security Code *