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Shampoo, Conditioner and Hairstyling Products - US - April 2017

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Apr 2017

Category :

Hair Care

No. of Pages : N/A

The mature shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products market has posted steady growth, driven by gains in the larger shampoo and conditioner segments, allowing the market to overcome struggling sales of hairspray and hairstyling products. However, concerns over damage and preferences for simplicity have left consumers skipping daily washing, creating longer purchase cycles. Natural offerings, which are perceived as being gentler on hair, can promote more frequent shampooing. Additionally, adults are embracing their natural texture; products that enhance one’s hair or that tout healthy-looking claims are resonating.

Table of Content

OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Market experiences steady growth, driven by gains in shampoo
Figure 1: Percent change of total US retail sales of shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products, by segment, 2012-16 (est)
Product usage of staples is widespread, but consumers aren’t using daily
Figure 2: Haircare product usage – Mean (#), January 2017
Concerns over damage, preferences for natural-looks limit usage frequency
Figure 3: Select attitudes toward haircare products and routines, January 2017
The opportunities
Alternative formats may increase usage frequency
Figure 4: MULO sales of select dry shampoos, 52-weeks ending December 25, 2016
Natural haircare offerings could convince shoppers to splurge
Figure 5: Select attitudes toward natural haircare, by age, January 2017
Products that promote natural looks, healthy-hair resonate
Figure 6: Select haircare claims, January 2017
What it means

THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products achieve growth
Shampoo the largest and fastest growing haircare segment
Black haircare, men’s haircare markets outpace overall category growth
Aging population slows growth, multicultural consumers demand own products

MARKET SIZE AND FORECAST
Historic and projected sales performance
Figure 7: Total US sales and fan chart forecast of shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products, at current prices, 2011-21
Figure 8: Total US sales and forecast of shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products, at current prices, 2011-21

MARKET BREAKDOWN
Shampoo is the largest haircare segment, growing
Figure 9: Share of shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products sales, by segment, 2016 (est)
Figure 10: Percent change of total US retail sales of shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products, by segment, 2012-16 (est)

MARKET PERSPECTIVE
Black haircare, men’s segments outperform total haircare market
Figure 11: Percent change of total US retail sales of haircare segments, including home hair color, men’s haircare, shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products, and Black haircare, 2012-16 (est)
Healthy-hair, natural claims rising in product launches
Figure 12: Share of haircare products making select claims, 2011-16
Beauty from within becomes increasingly relevant in haircare

MARKET FACTORS
Growing population of adults aged 25-44 buoys market challenged by aging population
Figure 13: Population by age, 2012-22
Growing multicultural population alters product landscape
Figure 14: Population by race and Hispanic origin, percent change, 2017-22

KEY PLAYERS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Despite struggles, Unilever and P&G still dominate haircare sales
Positive perceptions boost Dove sales, limited awareness a challenge for OGX
Natural, healthy-hair claims resonate, men’s shampoo holds strong
Natural skincare struggles to extend into haircare, cleansing conditioners lack awareness
New approach toward skincare-inspired claims, low shampoos on-trend

MANUFACTURER SALES OF SHAMPOO, CONDITIONER, AND HAIRSTYLING PRODUCTS
Unilever, P&G garner half of MULO sales but are struggling
Manufacturer sales of shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products
Figure 15: Manufacturer sales of shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products, 2015 and 2016

BRAND PERCEPTIONS
Positive perceptions boosts Dove sales, limited awareness a challenge for OGX
Figure 16: Correspondence Analysis – Brand perceptions, January 2017
Figure 17: Brand perceptions, January 2017
Methodology

WHAT’S WORKING?
Natural claims are two-fold, referring to ingredients and hairstyles
Figure 18: MULO sales of select natural haircare products, 52-weeks ending December 25, 2016
Figure 19: MULO sales of select haircare products that encourage embracing natural hair, 52-weeks ending December 25, 2016
Healthy-hair claims on-trend with current hair preferences
Figure 20: MULO sales of select haircare products touting healthy hair claims, 52-weeks ending December 25, 2016
Men’s shampoo experiences overall gains, though some brands get left behind
Figure 21: MULO sales of select men’s haircare products, 52-weeks ending December 25, 2016
Dry shampoos continue to gain traction
Figure 22: MULO sales of select dry shampoos, 52-weeks ending December 25, 2016

WHAT’S STRUGGLING?
Natural skincare brands struggle to find success in haircare
Figure 23: MULO sales of select Yes To and Burt’s Bees products, 52-weeks ending December 25, 2016
Cleansing conditioners slow to take off in MULO
Figure 24: MULO sales of select cleansing conditioner and co-washes, 52-weeks ending December 25, 2016

WHAT’S NEXT?
New skincare-inspired haircare products offer more relevant benefits
Formats including overnight products, balm-to-oil capitalize on healthy hair trends
Impact of lifestyle factors result in broader claims including UV protection, anti-pollution
Product launches address Halal claims
Figure 25: Select Halal certified products
“Low shampoos” create a full spectrum between shampoo and cleansing conditioners

THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Genes and shampoo seen as biggest influencers on hair’s appearance
Shampoo and conditioner usage widespread, but not used daily
Hairstyling and hair treatment products reach more limited audiences
Healthy-looking hair, moisturizing top-of-mind for consumers
Natural haircare offerings benefit from generally positive views
Consumers embrace natural hair texture, concerned over shampoos

FACTORS IMPACTING THE APPEARANCE OF HAIR
Adults believe genes, shampoo usage have the biggest impact on hair
Lifestyle factors also relevant
Figure 26: Factors impacting the appearance of hair, January 2017
Younger women emphasize importance of conditioner
Figure 27: Select factors impacting the appearance of hair, any rank (net), by gender and age, January 2017
Hispanic and Black adults recognize impact of lifestyle on hair
Figure 28: Select factors impacting the appearance of hair – Any rank (net), by all, Hispanic, and Black adults, January 2017

SHAMPOO USAGE AND FREQUENCY
Most people use shampoo – but not daily
Figure 29: Shampoo usage, by any use (net)* and frequency, January 2017
Figure 30: Shampoo usage – Mean (#), January 2017
Dry shampoo resonating with younger adults, who shampoo less often
Figure 31: Shampoo usage, by age – Any use (net)*, January 2017
Figure 32: Shampoo usage – Mean (#), by gender and age, January 2017
Black adults less likely to use shampoo
Figure 33: Shampoo usage – Any use (net)*, by race/Hispanic origin, January 2017
Figure 34: Shampoo usage – Mean (#), by race/Hispanic origin, January 2017

CONDITIONER USAGE AND FREQUENCY
Conditioner usage is widespread, but not a daily staple
Figure 35: Conditioner usage, by any use (net)* and frequency, January 2017
Figure 36: Conditioner usage – Mean (#), January 2017
Younger women drive conditioner usage
Figure 37: Conditioner usage – Any use (net)*, by gender and age, January 2017
Figure 38: Conditioner usage – Mean (#), by gender and age, January 2017
Hispanics use conditioner more often
Figure 39: Conditioner usage – Any use (net)*, by race/Hispanic origin, January 2017
Figure 40: Conditioner usage – Mean (#), by race/Hispanic origin, January 2017

HAIRSTYLING PRODUCT USAGE AND FREQUENCY
Hairstyling products used sparingly
Figure 41: Hairstyling product usage, by any use (net)* and frequency, January 2017
Figure 42: hairstyling usage– Mean (#), January 2017
Younger men drive usage of hairstyling products
Figure 43: hairstyling usage – Any use (net)*, by gender and age, January 2017
Figure 44: Hairstyling product usage – Mean (#), by gender and age, January 2017
Hispanics over index across hairstyling product types
Figure 45: Hairstyling usage – Any use (net)*, by race/Hispanic origin, January 2017
Figure 46: Hairstyling product usage – Mean (#), by race/Hispanic origin, January 2017

HAIR TREATMENT USAGE AND FREQUENCY
Hair treatment usage remains low
Figure 47: Hair treatment usage, by any use (net)* and frequency, January 2017
Figure 48: hair treatment usage – Mean (#), January 2017
Younger women stronger users of hair treatment products
Figure 49: hair treatment usage – Any use (net)*, by gender and age, January 2017
Figure 50: hair treatment usage – Mean (#), by age, January 2017
Multicultural adults more engaged with hair treatment products
Figure 51: Hair treatment usage – Any use (net)*, by race/Hispanic origin, January 2017
Figure 52: hair treatment usage – Mean (#), by race/Hispanic origin, January 2017

HAIRCARE CLAIMS
Healthy-looking hair, moisturizing claims in high demand
Personalized products resonate
Anti-aging, anti-pollution offerings reach niche audiences
Figure 53: Haircare claims, January 2017
Claims more influential to women
Figure 54: Haircare claims, by gender, January 2017
Younger adults expect more from their haircare products
Figure 55: Select haircare claims, by age, January 2017
Black consumers seek products targeted at their ethnicity
Figure 56: Select haircare claims, by all, Hispanic, and Black consumers, January 2017

ATTITUDES TOWARD NATURAL HAIRCARE
Consumers hold positive views of natural offerings
Perceptions that natural products are expensive challenges natural brands
Figure 57: Attitudes toward natural haircare, January 2017
Younger adults hold more positive attitudes toward natural haircare
Figure 58: Select attitudes toward natural haircare, by age, January 2017
Hispanics hold favorable views of natural haircare, may not translate to sales
Figure 59: Select attitudes toward natural haircare, by race/Hispanic origin, January 2017

ATTITUDES TOWARD HAIRCARE PRODUCTS AND ROUTINES
Preference for simplicity, natural texture challenge haircare market
Concerns over shampoo translate into less-than-daily usage
Consumers lack engagement, awareness of newer formats
Figure 60: Attitudes toward haircare products and routines, January 2017
Younger women express concerns that shampoo damages hair
Figure 61: Select attitudes toward haircare products and routines, by gender and age, January 2017
Black consumers prefer natural styles, skip shampoo
Figure 62: Attitudes toward haircare products and routines, by race/Hispanic origin, January 2017

APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
Data sources
Sales data
Fan chart forecast
Consumer survey data
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations

APPENDIX – MARKET
Figure 63: Total US sales and forecast of shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2011-21
Figure 64: Total US retail sales and forecast of shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products, by segment, at current prices, 2011-21
Figure 65: Total US retail sales of shampoo, conditioner, and hairstyling products, by channel, at current prices, 2011-16

APPENDIX – KEY PLAYERS
Figure 66: MULO sales of shampoo, by leading companies and brands, rolling 52 weeks 2015 and 2016
Figure 67: MULO sales of conditioner, by leading companies and brands, rolling 52 weeks 2015 and 2016
Figure 68: MULO sales of hairspray/spritz, by leading companies and brands, rolling 52 weeks 2015 and 2016
Figure 69: MULO sales of hairstyling products, by leading companies and brands, rolling 52 weeks 2015 and 2016

APPENDIX – CONSUMER
Figure 70: Shampoo brand usage, August 2011-August 2016
Figure 71: Conditioner brand usage, August 2011-August 2016
Figure 72: Hair spray brand usage, August 2011-August 2016
Figure 73: Hair styling gels/creams/lotions brand usage, August 2011-August 2016
Figure 74: Usage of shampoo, conditioner, hairspray, and hairstyling gels/creams/lotions, August 2011-August 2016
Figure 75: Usage of shampoo, conditioner, hairspray, and hairstyling gels/creams/lotions, August 2011-August 2016

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