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Seniors and Health - US - November 2017

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Nov 2017

Category :

Lifestyle

No. of Pages : N/A

The number of Seniors, adults aged 65+, is on the rise, and by 2022 will account for 17.7% of the total US population. Today’s Seniors are increasingly tech savvy, yet remain dedicated to the basics of health management. The current age of a Senior, younger (65-74) versus older (75+), influences their health attitudes and healthcare needs. Still, Seniors are engaged in proactive health measures that ease the impact of aging, which is generating positive health perceptions for the majority.

Table of Contents

OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Growing Senior population and strong use strains healthcare providers
Figure 1: Visited provider to treat at least yearly (net), August 2017
Seniors fall short of exercise guidelines; health issues may be getting in the way
Figure 2: Future outlook on personal health, by exercise focus, August 2017
Loneliness can have negative health implications
Figure 3: Feelings of loneliness, by health focuses, August 2017
The opportunities
Seniors are focused on and optimistic about their health
Figure 4: Any rank current focuses in life, August 2017
Products and services should target specific needs
Figure 5: Technology usage and interest, August 2017
Providers promote connection; wellness brands should tap into this relationship
Figure 6: Motivations in choosing healthcare provider, August 2017
What it means
THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Senior population is growing; its demographic composition uniform
Health is a priority, yet Seniors fall short of physical activity guidelines
Government-sponsored health insurance is common
Baby Boomers are aging into the Senior lifestage
Not everyone lives with someone
Many regularly shop online and use social media
SENIORS BY THE NUMBERS
Seniors possess the strongest growth within the US population
Figure 7: US population, by age, 2012-22
Senior women continue to outnumber Senior men
Figure 8: US population aged 65+, by gender, 2017-22
The Senior population is less racially diverse
Figure 9: US population aged 65+, by race and Hispanic origin, 2016
Seniors possess the highest median household net worth
Figure 10: Median household net worth, by age of householder, 2013-16
SENIORS’ HEALTH BREAKDOWN
Seniors prioritize and optimistic about personal health
Figure 11: Any rank current focuses in life, August 2017
Figure 12: Personal health future optimism, August 2017
Yet, Seniors fall short of physical activity guidelines
Figure 13: Percentage of adults who met physical activity guidelines for aerobic activity, gender and age, 2016
Seniors depend on government sponsored health insurance
Figure 14: Type of health insurance coverage, by age, 2016
MARKET PERSPECTIVE
The looming Baby Boomer impact
Figure 15: Percent distribution of the projected US population, by age, 2015-30
MARKET FACTORS
Not all Seniors live with someone
Figure 16: Distribution of households, by age of householder and type of household, 2016
Half of Seniors regularly shop online and use social media
Figure 17: Regular use of tech-based services, by age, August 2017
KEY PLAYERS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Brands could partner with Senior programs, target specific needs, and enhance current offerings
Seniors are set in their ways
Technology assists, Seniors model wellness, yet loneliness looms
WHAT’S IN?
Partner with programs that understand Seniors
Seniors seek customized solutions and doctor endorsements
Figure 18: Select VMS claims perceptions, by age, July 2017
Enhance services to allow Seniors to age in place
WHAT’S STRUGGLING?
Loneliness can have a negative impact on health
Figure 19: Agree I sometimes feel lonely, August 2017
Seniors are set in their weight management ways
Figure 20: Weight management method, by age, July 2017
Some Seniors need modern day sex education
WHAT’S NEXT?
The future is connected, particularly for Seniors
Health and wellness brands should utilize Senior spokespeople
Relieving mental impairment with VR
THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Health perceptions improve with health optimism
There’s a focus on proactive care
Seniors are engaged in their health care
Seniors want to be connected with healthcare providers
Most take medications; few use “elderly” products
Specific diagnostic devices used most; overall health tech use is low
HEALTH STATUS
More than half of Seniors feel healthier than their peers
Figure 21: Health status, by gender and age, August 2017
Healthier adults focused on proactive health behaviors
Figure 22: Health status, by select health focus, August 2017
Seniors with something to look forward to are healthier
Figure 23: Senior attitudes toward loneliness and the future, by health status, August 2017
Optimism drives up health perceptions
Figure 24: Future outlook on personal health, by health status, August 2017
HEALTH FOCUSES
More Seniors focus on proactive care
Figure 25: Health focuses, by gender and age, August 2017
Setting the goal to improve health escalates current focuses
Figure 26: Personal goals, by health focuses, August 2017
Outlook on health impacts current health focuses
Figure 27: Future outlook on personal health, by health focuses, August 2017
Loneliness impacts health focuses
Figure 28: Feelings of loneliness, by health focuses, August 2017
FREQUENCY OF CARE
Seniors are active participants in their healthcare
Figure 29: Frequency of care, August 2017
Women are steady, men’s frequency jumps as they age
Figure 30: Frequency of general health and women’s/men’s wellness treatment, by gender and age, August 2017
Dental health is a priority for Seniors
Figure 31: Frequency of dental health treatment, by gender and age and household income, August 2017
MOTIVATIONS IN CHOOSING A HEALTHCARE PROVIDER
Seniors want to be connected with their healthcare providers
Figure 32: Motivations in choosing healthcare provider, August 2017
Men and women have varying requirements
Figure 33: Motivations in choosing healthcare provider, by gender and age, August 2017
Location impacts provider preferences
Figure 34: Select motivations in choosing healthcare provider, by area, August 2017
Focus on the future increases need for comprehensive care
Figure 35: Improving health is personal goal in the next five years, by comprehensive care is motivation in choosing healthcare provider, August 2017
HEALTHCARE PRODUCTS
Most Seniors take medications; few use “elderly” products
Figure 36: Healthcare product usage, August 2017
Increased age brings on more product use
Figure 37: Healthcare product usage, by gender and age, August 2017
Healthier Seniors require less reactive healthcare products
Figure 38: Health status, by healthcare product usage, August 2017
The use of health aids correlates to pessimistic health outlook
Figure 39: Future outlook on personal health, by select health product usage, August 2017
TECHNOLOGY
Specific technology tools used most; overall usage is low
Figure 40: Technology usage and interest, August 2017
Older Seniors embrace the basics; younger Seniors more tech-savvy
Figure 41: Blood pressure monitor and heart rate monitor usage and interest, by gender and age, August 2017
Figure 42: General health app, fitness app, and wearable device, any usage or interest (net), by gender and age, August 2017
APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
Data sources
Consumer survey data
Consumer qualitative research
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations
APPENDIX – THE CONSUMER
Figure 43: Table – TURF analysis – Healthcare provider, August 2017
Methodology
Qualitative quotes

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