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Quick Service Restaurants - US - May 2017

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Jun 2017

Category :

Hotels & Restaurants

No. of Pages : N/A

As the foodservice landscape shifts, fast food restaurants are trying to find a balance between tradition and innovation. The core reasons consumers visit fast food restaurants have remained fairly stable; however, innovation in technology and new forms of competition create different levels of expectation from consumers. Fast food operators consistently have to determine when it’s smart to innovate and when it’s best not to.

Table of Content

OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Discount supermarkets receive modern, health forward updates
Figure 1: Food sales at home and away from home, December 2015-December 2016
Fast food faces a customization struggle
Figure 2: Interest in customizable menu items from 2016 to 2017, by iGens and Millennials, February 2016 and March 2017
Urban and suburban Millennials are not one and the same
Figure 3: Consumer attitudes toward QSRs, by urban and suburban Millennials, March 2017
The opportunities
Target iGens with speciality beverages
Figure 4: QSR beverage preferences, by iGens and Millennials, March 2017
Parents are a key demographic for basic coffee offerings
Figure 5: QSR beverage preferences, by parent and nonparent, March 2017
Fast food has tradition on its side
Figure 6: Trust toward QSR Menu Claims, March 2017
What it means

THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Lunch becomes a core area of competition
Delivery is changing the game
An opportunity to bring back play

MARKET PERSPECTIVE
Delivery has changed what convenience means
Figure 7: Reasons for having restaurant food delivered, June 2016
Starbucks and grocery stores compete with the QSR space to target the lunch crowd
Life – An Informal Affair Trend

MARKET FACTORS
The evolving definition of play for parents and kids
Affordable grocery stores cater to health forward food trends
Figure 8: Food sales at home and away from home, December 2015-December 2016

KEY TRENDS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
The power of social media
Regional menu items provide local appeal
The operations behind automation

WHAT’S WORKING?
Regional dishes go national
Defining a fast food core in an evolving foodservice landscape
A social media identity

WHAT’S STRUGGLING?
Value in a competitive landscape
Breakfast gets competitive

WHAT’S NEXT?
Automation requires new operational logistics
Clean label commitments

THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Soda leads in beverage interest
Consumers are satisfied with fast food quality and consistency
Claims can have a different meaning for every generation

VISITATION BY CHAIN
McDonald’s leads in visitation
Figure 9: QSR visitation by chain, March 2017
Men are a target consumer, but don’t count out women
Figure 10: QSR visitation by chain, by gender, March 2017
Figure 11: QSR visitation by chain, by gender and age, March 2017
Taco Bell appeals to younger consumers
Figure 12: QSR visitation by chain, by generation, March 2017
Higher income consumers are a demographic to watch
Figure 13: Any QSR visitation, by income, March 2017
Taco Bell and Arby’s share a similar demographic
Figure 14: visitation to QSR Chains, by Taco Bell Visitors, March 2017
Parents rely on fast food
Figure 15: QSR visitation by chain, by parent and nonparent, March 2017
Hispanics are core fast food consumers
Figure 16: QSR visitation by chain, by Hispanic origin, March 2017

QSR BEVERAGE PREFERENCES
Soda leads in fast food beverage preferences
Figure 17: QSR beverage preferences, March 2017
Iced tea appeals to women
Figure 18: QSR beverage preferences, by gender, March 2017
Parents love coffee
Figure 19: QSR beverage preferences, by parent and nonparent, March 2017
iGens care about the specialty beverages
Figure 20: QSR beverage preferences, by iGens and Millennials, March 2017

SATISFACTION ACROSS QSR CHAINS
Overall satisfaction for McDonald’s, Taco Bell and Arby’s
Figure 21: Key drivers of satisfaction with QSRs, March 2017
Taco Bell delivers in innovation
Figure 22: Key drivers of satisfaction with Taco Bell, March 2017
McDonald’s struggles with innovation and health
Figure 23: Key drivers of satisfaction with McDonald’s, March 2017
Arby’s drives satisfaction with menu variety
Figure 24: Key drivers of satisfaction with Arby’s, March 2017

TRUST TOWARD MENU ITEM CLAIMS
Classic and Traditional are the most trusted claims for fast food
Figure 25: Trust toward QSR Menu Claims, March 2017
What claims are really on the menu?
Figure 26: QSR menu item claims, Q1 2015-Q1 2017
Figure 27: QSR menu item claims, Q1 2015-Q1 2017
Women need increased proof for natural claims
Figure 28: Trust toward select QSR Menu Claims, by gender, March 2017
Claims have a different meaning for every generation
Figure 29: Trust toward QSR Menu Claims, by generation, March 2017
Blacks lean toward the homestyle claim
Figure 30: Trust toward QSR Menu Claims, by blacks and non-blacks, March 2017
Hispanic Millennials trust the handcrafted approach
Figure 31: Trust toward QSR Menu Claims, by Hispanic Millennials and non-Hispanic Millennials, March 2017
Taco Bell defines signature menu items
Figure 32: Trust toward QSR Menu Claims, by QSR chain, March 2017

ATTITUDES TOWARD QSRS
Convenience remains key area of focus for fast food
Figure 33: Consumer attitudes towards QSRs, by generation, March 2017
Coffee presents opportunity
Men value the fast food experience more than women
Figure 34: Consumer attitudes towards QSRs, by gender, March 2017
Coffee happy hours can appeal to Hispanic consumers
Figure 35: Consumer attitudes towards QSRs, by Hispanic origin, March 2017
Happy hour anyone?
Figure 36: Consumer attitudes towards QSRs, by age, March 2017

QSR MENU PREFERENCES
The healthy challenge
Figure 37: Menu preferences at QSRs from 2016-2017, February 2016 and March 2017
Women care about healthy sides and men care about premium ingredients
Figure 38: Menu preferences at QSRs, by gender, March 2017
Healthy sides versus fried sides
Figure 39: Interest in healthy and fried sides from 2016 to 2017, by iGens and Millennials, February 2016 and March 2017
Offering customization in moderation
Figure 40: Interest in customizable menu items from 2016 to 2017, by iGens and Millennials, February 2016 and March 2017
Sauce on the side…
Figure 41: QSR menu preferences, by parents and non-parents, March 2017
Can organic and fast food work together?
Figure 42: QSR menu preferences from 2016 to 2017, by race and Hispanic origin, March 2017

A LOOK INTO MILLENNIALS
Don’t count out urban Millennials
Figure 43: QSR visitation by chain, by urban and suburban Millennials, March 2017
Delivery presents opportunity with Millennials
Figure 44: Consumer attitudes toward QSRs, by urban and suburban Millennials, March 2017
Basic coffee fits the bill
Figure 45: Interest in QSR beverages, by Millennial parental status, living location and income level, March 2017
Signature versus premium
Figure 46: Trust toward QSR Menu Claims, by Millennial parental status, living location and income level, March 2017

APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
Data sources
Consumer survey data
Abbreviations
Abbreviations
Terms

APPENDIX – CONSUMER
Figure 47: Distribution of generations, by hispanic origin, 2017

APPENDIX – KEY DRIVER ANALYSIS
Interpretation of results
Figure 48: Level of satisfaction with Taco Bell, McDonald’s, and Arby’s – Key driver output, March 2017
Figure 48: Level of satisfaction with Taco Bell – Key driver output, March 2017
Figure 49: Level of satisfaction with McDonald’s – Key driver output, March 2017
Figure 50: Level of satisfaction with Arby’s – Key driver output, March 2017

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