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Non-Alcoholic Beverages Occasions - US - January 2014

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Jan 2014

Category :

Non-Alcoholic Drinks

No. of Pages : 161 Pages

Many beverages are pigeonholed to a degree by the times of day at which they are most commonly used. Brands could increase consumption frequency by positioning their products as suitable for a wider range of occasions and locations, such as milk with meals or juice drinks instead of sports drinks at the gym. Similarly, healthy non-alcoholic beverages such as milk, juice, and drinkable yogurt can be better positioned as snacks.
Table of Content

Scope and Themes

What you need to know
Definition
Data sources
Sales data
Consumer survey data
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations

Executive Summary

Overview
Non-alcoholic beverages grow moderately but steadily
Figure 1: Total US sales and fan chart forecast of non-alcoholic beverages, at current prices, 2008-18
Market mostly driven by demographics
The consumer
Respondents most apt to report any consumption of soft drinks, daily consumption of coffee
Figure 2: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption, by any consumption, November 2013
At-home daily drinkers of select beverages often keep drinks at home to take on the go
Figure 3: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption (at least once a day), by location of non-alcoholic beverage consumption—at-home drinkers, November 2013
Daily drinkers of select beverages bring drinks from home out to save money
Figure 4: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption (at least once a day), by location of non-alcoholic beverage consumption—away-from-home drinkers, November 2013
Home consumption greater than away-from-home consumption
Figure 5: Locations for non-alcoholic beverage consumption, November 2013
What we think

Issues and Insights

Can juice and milk extend beyond their primary use as breakfast drinks?
The issues
Insight: Positioning milk and juice as ideal for other occasions
How can sports drink brands increase consumption frequency?
The issues
Insights: Promoting other uses for sports drinks
How can healthy non-alcoholic beverages be better positioned as snacks?
The issues
Insights: Highlighting freshness and relatively minimal processing

Trend Applications

Trend: Transumers
Trend: Cool Vending
Mintel Futures: Generation Next

Market Size and Forecast

Key points
Sales grow steadily in 2010-13
Demographics, health concerns mainly drive sales
Further increases forecasted into 2018
Sales and forecast of non-alcoholic beverages
Figure 6: Total US sales and forecast of non-alcoholic beverages, at current prices, 2008-18
Figure 7: Total US sales and forecast of non-alcoholic beverages, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2008-18
Fan chart forecast
Figure 8: Total US sales and fan chart forecast of non-alcoholic beverages, at current prices, 2008-18

Market Drivers

Key points
Age factors significantly in household use of non-alcoholic beverages
Figure 9: Household usage of various types of non-alcoholic beverages, by age, May 2012-June 2013
The impact of household income
Figure 10: Household usage of various types of non-alcoholic beverages, by household income, May 2012-June 2013
Households with kids most likely to use juice products
Figure 11: Household usage of various types of non-alcoholic beverages, by presence of children in the household, May 2012-June 2013
Blacks, Hispanics, Asians report high household usage of OJ
Figure 12: Household usage of various types of non-alcoholic beverages, by race/Hispanic origin, May 2012-June 2013
Health considerations factor into non-alcoholic beverage perceptions
Figure 13: Characteristics associated with non-alcoholic beverage segments, November 2013
Time of day drives consumption of specific non-alcoholic beverages
Figure 14: Timing of non-alcoholic beverage consumption, November 2013

Marketing Strategies

Overview of the brand landscape
Theme: Occasion-specific positioning
Brand focus: Folgers
Figure 15: Folgers Coffee print ad, 2013
Brand focus: Milk Processor Education Program
Brand focus: Lipton
Figure 16: Lipton brand logo, 2013
Theme: Natural positioning
Brand focus: Simply Orange
Figure 17: Simply Orange print ad, 2013
Brand focus: Coke Zero
Figure 18: Coke Zero print ad, 2013

Locations for Non-alcoholic Beverage Consumption

Key points
Many drinks most likely to be consumed at home
Figure 19: Locations for non-alcoholic beverage consumption, November 2013

Attitudes toward Location of Consumption

Key points
Attitudes of at-home drinkers and daily consumption of non-alcoholic drinks
Figure 20: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption (at least once a day), by attitudes toward location of non-alcoholic beverage consumption—at-home drinkers, November 2013
Attitudes of away-from-home drinkers and daily consumption of non-alcoholic beverages
Figure 21: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption (at least once a day), by attitudes toward location of non-alcoholic beverage consumption—away-from-home drinkers, November 2013

Attitudes toward Timing of Non-alcoholic Beverage Consumption

Key points
Attitudes toward non-alcoholic beverages by time of day consumed
Figure 22: Attitudes toward timing of non-alcoholic beverage consumption, by gender, November 2013
18-34s most apt to look for function and fun
Figure 23: Attitudes toward timing of non-alcoholic beverage consumption, by age, November 2013

Consumption and Consumption Timing of Various Non-alcoholic Beverages

Key points
Daily non-alcoholic drink users and attitudes toward morning consumption
Figure 24: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption (at least once a day), by attitudes toward timing of non-alcoholic beverage consumption—morning drinkers, November 2013
Daily non-alcoholic drink users and attitudes toward afternoon consumption
Figure 25: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption (at least once a day), by attitudes toward timing of non-alcoholic beverage consumption—afternoon drinkers, November 2013
Daily non-alcoholic drink users and attitudes toward evening consumption
Figure 26: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption (at least once a day), by attitudes toward timing of non-alcoholic beverage consumption—evening drinkers, November 2013
Daily non-alcoholic drink users and attitudes toward snack consumption
Figure 27: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption (at least once a day), by attitudes toward timing of non-alcoholic beverage consumption—between meals, November 2013

Characteristics Associated with Carbonated Soft Drinks

Key points
Respondents most apt to associate soft drinks with refreshment
Figure 28: Characteristics associated with carbonated soft drinks, by gender, November 2013
Those aged 55+ most apt to associate soft drinks with refreshment
Figure 29: Characteristics associated with carbonated soft drinks, by age, November 2013

Characteristics Associated with Juice and Juice Drinks

Key points
Most perceive juice/juice drinks as healthy, refreshing, natural
Figure 30: Characteristics associated with juice and juice drinks, by gender, November 2013
18-24s most apt to perceive juice as refreshing, natural, suitable for kids
Figure 31: Characteristics associated with juice and juice drinks, by age, November 2013

Characteristics Associated with Bottled Water

Key points
Hydration, refreshment most commonly associated with bottled water
Figure 32: Characteristics associated with bottled water, by gender, November 2013
18-24s most likely to associate bottled water with positive characteristics
Figure 33: Characteristics associated with bottled water, by age, November 2013

Characteristics Associated with Sports Drinks

Key points
Less than half of respondents associate sports drinks with hydration
Figure 34: Characteristics associated with sports drinks, by gender, November 2013
18-24s most likely to associate sports drinks with positive attributes
Figure 35: Characteristics associated with sports drinks, by age, November 2013

Characteristics Associated with Energy Drinks

Key points
Only 22% perceive energy drinks as functional
Figure 36: Characteristics associated with energy drinks, by gender, November 2013
Younger respondents most apt to perceive positive attributes
Figure 37: Characteristics associated with energy drinks, by age, November 2013

Characteristics Associated with Dairy and Non-dairy Drinks

Key points
Seven in 10 perceive milk as healthy
Figure 38: Characteristics associated with dairy and non-dairy drinks, by gender, November 2013
Seniors most apt to associate milk with health
Figure 39: Characteristics associated with dairy and non-dairy drinks, by age, November 2013

Frequency of Non-alcoholic Beverage Consumption

Key points
Daily consumption highest for coffee, bottled water
Figure 40: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption, November 2013

Frequency of Juice, Juice Drink, and/or Smoothie Consumption

Key points
Men report more daily usage of juice/juice drinks/smoothies than women
Figure 41: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption—juice, juice drinks, or smoothies, by gender, November 2013
18-34s most likely to drink juice at least once a week
Figure 42: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption—juice, juice drinks, or smoothies, by age, November 2013

Frequency of Uncarbonated, Still Bottled, or Sparkling Water Consumption

Key points
18-34s report most consumption of uncarbonated/still bottled water
Figure 43: Frequency of uncarbonated or still bottled water consumption, including flavored water, by age, November 2013
Presence of children equals more frequent consumption
Figure 44: Frequency of uncarbonated or still bottled water consumption, including flavored water, by presence of children in household, November 2013
18-34s most likely to report any consumption of sparkling water
Figure 45: Frequency of sparkling water consumption, including flavored water, by age, November 2013
Households with children most likely to report sparkling water use
Figure 46: Frequency of sparkling water consumption, including flavored water, by presence of children in household, November 2013

Frequency of Carbonated Soft Drink Consumption

Key points
Men more likely than women to go for soft drinks
Figure 47: Frequency of carbonated soft drink consumption, by gender, November 2013
Seniors most likely to avoid carbonated soft drinks
Figure 48: Frequency of carbonated soft drink consumption, by age, November 2013
Respondents with kids more apt to drink soft drinks
Figure 49: Frequency of carbonated soft drink consumption, by presence of children in household, November 2013

Frequency of Sports Drink Consumption

Key points
More than half of respondents use sports drinks; men more than women
Figure 50: Frequency of sports drink consumption, by gender, November 2013
Sports drinks most popular among younger respondents
Figure 51: Frequency of sports drink consumption, by age, November 2013
Presence of children means more frequent sports drink consumption
Figure 52: Frequency of sports drink consumption, by presence of children in household, November 2013

Frequency of Energy Drink/Shot Consumption

Key points
Roughly a third drink energy drinks; men more than women
Figure 53: Frequency of energy drinks and/or shots consumption, by gender, November 2013
18-34s very likely to use energy drinks
Figure 54: Frequency of energy drinks and/or shots consumption, by age, November 2013
Presence of children means higher likelihood to consume energy drinks
Figure 55: Frequency of energy drinks and/or shots consumption, by presence of children in household, November 2013

Frequency of Coffee and Ready-to-drink Coffee Consumption

Key points
Respondents more likely to drink ground, single-cup, instant coffee than RTD
Figure 56: Frequency of coffee consumption, by age, November 2013
Coffee consumption higher among households with children
Figure 57: Frequency of coffee consumption, by presence of children in household, November 2013

Frequency of Tea and Ready-to-drink Tea Consumption

Key points
Loose leaf, bagged, single-cup tea use much higher than RTD
Figure 58: Frequency of tea consumption, by gender, November 2013
18-34s most likely to drink RTD tea
Figure 59: Frequency of tea consumption, by age, November 2013
Presence of children translates to higher tea consumption
Figure 60: Frequency of tea consumption, by presence of children in household, November 2013

Frequency of Milk Consumption

Key points
Milk has high penetration
Figure 61: Frequency of milk consumption, by age, November 2013
Presence of children indicates higher and more frequent consumption
Figure 62: Frequency of milk consumption, by presence of children in household, November 2013

Frequency of Drinkable Yogurt and/or Kefir Consumption

Key points
Relatively low penetration for kefir and yogurt drinks
18-34s most likely to report any consumption
Figure 63: Frequency of drinkable yogurt and/or kefir consumption, by age, November 2013
Households with kids most likely to use yogurt drinks
Figure 64: Frequency of drinkable yogurt and/or kefir consumption, by presence of children in household, November 2013

Race and Hispanic Origin

Key points
Blacks report most likelihood to consume juice
Figure 65: Frequency of juice, juice drinks, or smoothies consumption, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Blacks most likely to report any consumption of bottled water
Figure 66: Frequency of uncarbonated or still bottled water consumption, including flavored water, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Hispanics, Blacks over index for consumption of sports drinks
Figure 67: Frequency of sports drink consumption, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Whites least likely to report any consumption of energy drinks
Figure 68: Frequency of energy drinks and/or shots consumption, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Asians, Hispanics most likely to consume RTD coffee daily and weekly
Figure 69: Frequency of coffee consumption, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Asians most apt to report any tea consumption
Figure 70: Frequency of tea consumption, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Asians, Hispanics most apt to report any consumption of drinkable yogurt
Figure 71: Frequency of drinkable yogurt and/or kefir consumption, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Blacks, Hispanics most apt to say a healthy morning drink is important
Figure 72: Attitudes toward timing of non-alcoholic beverage consumption, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Blacks most likely to perceive juice as affordable, fun, indulgent
Figure 73: Characteristics associated with juice and juice drinks, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Blacks most apt to view sports drinks as refreshing, healthy, fun
Figure 74: Characteristics associated with sports drinks, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Blacks, Asians most apt to perceive energy drinks as functional, refreshing
Figure 75: Characteristics associated with energy drinks, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013

Appendix – Market Drivers

Health and lifestyle
Figure 76: American adults by weight category as determined by body mass index (BMI), 2008-October 28, 2013
Childhood and teen obesity—highest in decades
Figure 77: Prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents aged 2-19, 1971-2010
Consumer confidence
Figure 78: University of Michigan’s index of consumer sentiment (ICS), 2007-13
Unemployment
Figure 79: US unemployment rate, by month, 2002-13
Figure 80: US unemployment and underemployment rates, 2007-13
Figure 81: Number of employed civilians in US, in thousands, 2007-13
Retail channels
Figure 82: Distribution of expenditures on food for off-premise consumption, by channel, 2008-12
Racial, ethnic population growth
Figure 83: US population by race and Hispanic origin, 2009, 2014, and 2019
Figure 84: Households with children, by race and Hispanic origin of householder, 2013
Shifting US demographics
Figure 85: US population, by age, 2009-19
Figure 86: US households, by presence of own children, 2003-13

Appendix – Other Useful Consumer Tables

Frequency of juice, juice drink, and/or smoothie consumption
Figure 87: Frequency of non-alcoholic beverage consumption—juice, juice drinks, or smoothies, by household income, November 2013
Frequency of uncarbonated, still bottled, or sparkling water consumption
Figure 88: Frequency of uncarbonated or still bottled water consumption, including flavored water, by gender, November 2013
Figure 89: Frequency of uncarbonated or still bottled water consumption, including flavored water, by household income, November 2013
Figure 90: Frequency of sparkling water consumption, including flavored water, by gender, November 2013
Figure 91: Frequency of sparkling water consumption, including flavored water, by household income, November 2013
Frequency of carbonated soft drink consumption
Figure 92: Frequency of carbonated soft drink consumption, by household income, November 2013
Frequency of sports drink consumption
Figure 93: Frequency of sports drink consumption, by household income, November 2013
Frequency of energy drink/shot consumption
Figure 94: Frequency of energy drinks and/or shots consumption, by household income, November 2013
Frequency of coffee and ready-to-drink coffee consumption
Figure 95: Frequency of coffee consumption, by gender, November 2013
Figure 96: Frequency of coffee consumption, by household income, November 2013
Frequency of tea and ready-to-drink tea consumption
Figure 97: Frequency of tea consumption, by household income, November 2013
Frequency of milk consumption
Figure 98: Frequency of milk consumption, by gender, November 2013
Figure 99: Frequency of milk consumption, by household income, November 2013
Frequency of drinkable yogurt and/or kefir consumption
Figure 100: Frequency of drinkable yogurt and/or kefir consumption, by gender, November 2013
Figure 101: Frequency of drinkable yogurt and/or kefir consumption, by household income, November 2013
Attitudes toward timing of non-alcoholic beverage consumption
Figure 102: Attitudes toward timing of non-alcoholic beverage consumption, by household income, November 2013
Characteristics associated with carbonated soft drinks
Figure 103: Characteristics associated with carbonated soft drinks, by household income, November 2013
Characteristics associated with juice and juice drinks
Figure 104: Characteristics associated with juice and juice drinks, by household income, November 2013
Characteristics associated with bottled water
Figure 105: Characteristics associated with bottled water, by household income, November 2013
Characteristics associated with sports drinks
Figure 106: Characteristics associated with sports drinks, by household income, November 2013
Characteristics associated with energy drinks
Figure 107: Characteristics associated with energy drinks, by household income, November 2013
Characteristics associated with dairy and non-dairy drinks
Figure 108: Characteristics associated with dairy and non-dairy drinks, by household income, November 2013
Race and Hispanic origin
Figure 109: Frequency of carbonated soft drink consumption, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Figure 110: Frequency of milk consumption, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Figure 111: Characteristics associated with carbonated soft drinks, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Figure 112: Characteristics associated with bottled water, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013
Figure 113: Characteristics associated with dairy and non-dairy drinks, by race/Hispanic origin, November 2013

Appendix – Trade Associations

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