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Mens Facial Skincare - UK - May 2015

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : May 2015

Category :

Skincare

No. of Pages : 106 Pages


The high proportion of men describing their skin as neutral presents opportunities in the market for better diagnostic tools and more help for men to identify their skin’s needs and products suited to them. Male-specific expertise is important, with most men choosing and purchasing their own skincare products.

Product usage shows that men may be using anti-ageing products for prevention rather than cure, with the high proportion of young men with little concern about wrinkles using anti-ageing products. Growing urbanisation also presents opportunities, with urban men showing higher usage of moisturiser and cleanser than a year ago.
Table of Content

Introduction

Products covered in this report
Abbreviations

Executive Summary

A market in need of stable growth
Figure 1: Best- and worst-case forecast for UK retail sales of men’s facial skincare, 2009-19
Improving financial situations could boost the market
Innovation remains steady
Figure 2: New launches in the UK men’s facial skincare market, branded vs own-label, January 2012 – February 2015
Anti-ageing sees a rise
Figure 3: Top 10 positioning claims for new product launches in the UK men’s facial skincare market, 2014
Men don’t know the skin they’re in
Figure 4: Men’s facial skin type, March 2015
Young men are using soap and facial cleanser
Figure 5: Facial skincare products used, March 2015
What we think

Issues and Insights

Men don’t know their own skin
The facts
The implications
Men want male expertise
The facts
The implications
Anti-ageing products: Prevention rather than cure
The facts
The implications
Growing urbanisation offers opportunities
The facts
The implications

Market Drivers

Key points
Rise in young professionals with decline in teenagers
Figure 6: Trends in the age structure of the UK male population, 2009-19
Rise in employment boosting the market
Figure 7: Employment and unemployment, by men, 2009-19
Greater disposable income could bode well for prestige
Figure 8: Trends in current financial situation compared a year ago, March 2012-March 2015
Rise of the ‘spornosexual’
Figure 9: Young men’s usage of self-tanning products in the past 12 months, August 2014
Inside-out beauty
Figure 10: Retail value sales of vitamins and supplements, by segment, 2012/13 and 2013/14

Who’s Innovating?

Key points
Innovation remains steady
Figure 11: New launches in the UK men’s facial skincare market, branded vs own-label, January 2012 – February 2015
Figure 12: Examples of facial skincare launches for men from direct selling brands, January 2014-March 2015
Anti-ageing sees a rise
Figure 13: Top 10 positioning claims for new product launches in the UK men’s facial skincare market, 2014
Figure 14: Examples of premium anti-ageing facial skincare launches for men, 2014
Rise in ‘protecting against the elements’ claims despite low interest
Estée Lauder focuses on education
Figure 15: New product launches in the UK men’s facial skincare market, by top 5 ultimate companies and other, 2014
Figure 16: Examples of facial skincare launches for men from Estée Lauder subsidiaries, 2014
L’Oréal relaunches Men Expert

Market Size and Forecast

Key points
A market with historically unstable growth
Figure 17: UK retail value sales of men’s facial skincare, at current and constant 2013 prices, 2009-19
Slow growth predicted
Figure 18: Best- and worst-case forecast for UK retail sales of men’s facial skincare, 2009-19
Forecast methodology

Segment Performance

Key points
Prestige shows strong growth…
Figure 19: UK retail value sales of men’s facial skincare, by category, 2013-14
whilst the mass market declines

Market Share

Key points
Brands offering both male and female skincare show decline
Figure 20: UK retail value sales of men’s mass market facial skincare, by brand, March 2014-March 2015
Male-specific mass market brands fare well

Companies and Products

L’Oréal
Background and structure
Strategy and financial performance
Figure 21: L’Oréal (UK) Ltd financial performance, 2012-13
Product range and innovation
Figure 22: Examples of new product launches by L’Oréal and its subsidiaries in the men’s facial skincare market, January 2014-March 2015
Marketing and advertising
Beiersdorf
Background and structure
Strategy and financial performance
Figure 23: Beiersdorf UK Limited financial performance, 2012 and 2013
Product range and innovation
Figure 24: Examples of new product launches under the Nivea Men brand in the men’s facial skincare market, January 2014-March 2015
Marketing and advertising
Estée Lauder
Background and structure
Strategy and financial performance
Figure 25: Estée Lauder Cosmetics Limited financial performance, 2013-14
Product range and innovation
Figure 26: Examples of new product launches by Estée Lauder subsidiaries in the men’s facial skincare market, January 2014-March 2015
Marketing and advertising
Cowshed
Background and structure
Strategy and financial performance
Figure 27: Cowshed Products Limited financial performance, 2012-13
Product range and innovation
Figure 28: Examples of new product launches by Cowshed in the men’s facial skincare market, January 2014 – March 2015
Marketing and advertising

Brand Communication and Promotion

Key points
Advertising spend shows fluctuation
Figure 29: Main monitored media advertising spend on men’s facial skincare, January 2012-March 2015
NIVEA leads advertising spend
Figure 30: Main monitored media advertising spend on men’s facial skincare, by company, 2014
Kiehl’s relies on word of mouth
Education is behind Estée Lauder campaigns

Brand Research

Key points
Brand map
Figure 31: Attitudes towards and usage of selected brands, March 2015
Key brand metrics
Figure 32: Key metrics for selected brands, March 2015
Brand attitudes: Tom Ford’s designer proposition assists premium image
Figure 33: Attitudes, by brand, March 2015
Brand personality: Location and price likely to boost accessibility of NIVEA Men and Dove Men+Care
Figure 34: Brand personality – Macro image, March 2015
L’Oréal Paris Men Expert, Clinique for Men and Tom Ford have an advantage when it comes to glamour and indulgence
Figure 35: Brand personality – Micro image, March 2015
Brand analysis
NIVEA Men boasts advantage across different metrics
Figure 36: User profile of NIVEA Men, March 2015
Dove Men+Care has slight advantage in perception of caring
Figure 37: User profile of Dove Men+Care, March 2015
L’Oréal Paris Men Expert is seen as more glamorous than mainstream competitors, but lacks the same proportion of trust
Figure 38: User profile of L’Oréal Paris Men Expert, March 2015
Clinique for Men has a glamorous and indulgent brand image
Figure 39: User profile of Clinique for Men, March 2015
Bulldog has strong youthful and quirky associations
Figure 40: User profile of Bulldog, March 2015
Tom Ford has an exclusive image through designer credentials
Figure 41: Demographic breakdown of who is aware of Tom Ford, March 2015
Jack Black lacks strength of image compared to other brands
Figure 42: Demographic breakdown of who is aware of Jack Black, March 2015

Channels to Market

Key points
Multiple grocers and online channels show strong growth
Figure 43: UK retail value sales of men’s facial skincare, by outlet type, 2013-14

The Consumer – Skin Type

Key points
Men don’t know the skin they’re in
Figure 44: Men’s facial skin type, March 2015
Young men have oily skin

The Consumer – Skin Concerns

Key points
Two in five men are not concerned about their skin
Figure 45: Facial skin concerns, March 2015
Skin types drive concern
The beard effect
Younger men have a greater range of concerns

The Consumer – Facial Skincare Products Used

Key points
Soap is the most popular product
Figure 46: Facial skincare products used, March 2015
Are men using soap and facial cleanser?
Cost is likely driving down usage
Facial moisturiser has high usage
Prevention rather than cure
Range of products used driven by cost and concerns
Figure 47: Repertoire of facial skincare products used, March 2015

The Consumer – Trends in Usage

Key points
Urbanisation may be driving up usage
Figure 48: Trends in skincare products used, March 2015
Young men using more products
Figure 49: Trends in skincare products used (those using more product than a year ago), by age, March 2015

The Consumer – Skincare Routines

Key points
Married men rely more on their partners
Figure 50: Men’s skincare routines, March 2015
Older men have simple routines
Dads care about their skin
A third of men do research

The Consumer – Purchase of Facial Skincare Products

Key points
More than half of men purchase their own products
Figure 51: Purchase of facial skincare products, March 2015
Brand name is the most important factor
Figure 52: Factors influencing purchase of facial skincare products, March 2015
Scientific claims and recommendations are low influencers

The Consumer – Attitudes towards Facial Skincare

Key points
Majority of men do not see value in facial skincare
Figure 53: Attitudes towards facial skincare, March 2015
Beauty through health
Short-term effort for long-term results
Men’s skin is different

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