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Hispanics and American Culture and Identity - US - July 2014

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Jul 2014

Category :

Lifestyle

No. of Pages : 140 Pages

While the majority of Hispanics are speaking English and the influence of the American culture in their lives is strong, there are cultural differences beyond language that need to be considered when determining the most efficient way of communicating with them. In order to successfully communicate with Hispanics, it is important for marketers to learn as much as they can about them and be able to put the cultural differences in the right perspective.
Table of Content

Scope and Themes

What you need to know
Definition
Figure 1: Hispanics by level of acculturation, March 2014
Figure 2: Hispanics’ gender, age, household income, and language spoken at home, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Data sources
Consumer survey data

Executive Summary

55 million and counting
Figure 3: Population, by race and Hispanic origin, 1970-2020
Hispanics’ purchasing power by 2018 is projected to be $1.6 trillion
Figure 4: Purchasing power, by race/Hispanic origin, 1990-2018
Americans, but not typical
Figure 5: Perceived difference of Hispanics (self) versus typical American – difference of top 2 box, March 2014
The acculturation path: from family oriented to individualistic
Figure 6: Correspondence analysis, March 2014
Importance of values and traditions
Figure 7: Importance of values and traditions among Hispanics, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Importance of family
Figure 8: Importance of family among Hispanics, by level of acculturation, March 2014
The importance of Spanish
Figure 9: Importance of Spanish language among Hispanics, by level of acculturation, March 2014
For the majority of Hispanics, this is home
Figure 10: Hispanics’ future plans, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Hispanic culture still strong at bicultural households
Figure 11: People Hispanics spend time with, bicultural Hispanics, March 2014
What we think

Issues and Insights

As more Hispanics speak English, are they being reached by general marketing efforts?
The issues
The implications
With the majority of Hispanics younger than 18 being born in the US, are Hispanic values and traditions in danger of being lost?
The issues
The implications
Entering their circle
The issues
The implications

Trend Application

Trend: Many Mes
Trend: Immaterial World
Trend: Edutainment

Buying Power of US Hispanics

Key points
Hispanics’ purchasing power growth between 1990 and 2018 is projected to be 666%
Figure 12: Purchasing power, by race/Hispanic origin, 1990-2018
Figure 13: Purchasing power, by race/Hispanic origin, 1990-2018
Figure 14: Top 10 states ranked by share of Hispanic buying power, rank by Hispanic share of buying power by state, 2013
Figure 15: Top 10 states ranked by dollar amount of Hispanic buying power, 2013
US household income distribution
Figure 16: Median household income, by race and Hispanic origin of householder, 2012

Demographic Profile of US Hispanics

Key points
Population trends
Figure 17: Population by race and Hispanic origin, 2009-19
Figure 18: Population, by race and Hispanic origin, 1970-2020
Figure 19: Asian, Black, and Hispanic populations, 1970-2020
Hispanic share of births
Figure 20: Distribution of births, by race and Hispanic origin of mother, 2002-12
The Hispanic and total US population by age
Figure 21: Hispanic share of the population, by age, 2009-19
The Hispanic and total US population by gender
Figure 22: Population, by gender and Hispanic origin, 2009-19
Figure 23: Age distribution of women, by Hispanic origin, 2014
Figure 24: Age distribution of men, by Hispanic origin, 2014
Characteristics
Marital status
Figure 25: Marital status of people aged 18 or older, by race and Hispanic origin, 2013
Figure 26: Marital status of Hispanics, by age, 2013
Figure 27: Gender ratio, by age and Hispanic origin, 2014
Household size
Figure 28: Average household size and average number of adults and children in households, by race and Hispanic origin, 2013
Children in the household
Figure 29: Households, by presence and ages of own children, 2013
Generations
Figure 30: Generations, by Hispanic origin, 2014
Figure 31: Distribution of generations by race and Hispanic origin, 2014
Hispanics by country of origin/heritage
Figure 32: Hispanic population, by country of origin/heritage
Mexicans (63% of US Hispanics)
Figure 33: Number of tortilla-related products launched per year in the US, 1996-2013
Puerto Ricans (9% of US Hispanics)
Cubans (4% of US Hispanics)
Dominicans (3% of US Hispanics)
Central Americans (8% of US Hispanics)
South Americans (5% of US Hispanics)
Figure 34: US Hispanic population, by country of origin/heritage, 2000-10
Figure 35: Largest* Hispanic groups, by region, by country of origin/ancestry, 2010
Hispanics by geographic concentration
Figure 36: Hispanic population, by region of residence, 2000-10
Figure 37: Hispanic or Latino population as a percentage of total population by county, 2010
States with the most Hispanic population growth
Figure 38: States ranked by change in Hispanic population, 2000-10
Figure 39: Percent change in Hispanic or Latino population by county, 2000-10
Key Hispanic metropolitan areas
Figure 40: Metropolitan areas with the largest number of Hispanic residents, by country of origin/ancestry, 2010
Hispanics online
Figure 41: Internet use among Hispanics aged 18+, 2013

Marketing Strategies

Theme: Remembering roots and final destination
Ronald McDonald House Charities – Hacer TV spot
Figure 42: Ronald McDonald House Charities, Hacer Spanish TV spot, June 2014
Theme: Satirizing Hispanics’ interaction with the American culture
Kraft Macaroni & Cheese – “Compra Secreta (Secret Purchase)” TV Spot
Figure 43: Kraft Mac and Cheese, Compra Secreta TV spot, June 2014
Theme: Multiple generations in the household
Honey Bunches of Oats – “Abuelita” TV Spot
Figure 44: Honey Bunches of Oats, Abuelita TV spot, June 2014

How Hispanics See Themselves

Key points
Mirror, mirror on the wall…
Figure 45: Perceived difference of Hispanics (self) vs typical American – difference of top 2 box, March 2014
Correspondence analysis
Methodology
The acculturation path: from family oriented to individualistic
Figure 46: Correspondence analysis, March 2014
Figure 47: Phrases used by Hispanics to describe themselves – Top 2 Box, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Younger Hispanics more individualistic
Figure 48: Phrases used by Hispanics to describe themselves – Top 2 Box, by age, March 2014
Hispanics don’t have strong feelings about how to describe the typical American
Figure 49: Phrases Hispanics use to describe the typical American– Top 2 Box, by age, March 2014
Unacculturated Hispanics have a positive image of the typical American
Figure 50: Phrases Hispanics use to describe the typical American– Top 2 Box, by level of acculturation, March 2014

Importance of Hispanic Values and Traditions

Key points
Importance of values and traditions
Figure 51: Importance of values and traditions among Hispanics, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Hispanic women play important role instilling Hispanic values and traditions
Figure 52: Importance of values and traditions among Hispanics, by gender, March 2014
Importance of Hispanic values and traditions decreases slightly with income
Figure 53: Importance of values and traditions among Hispanics, by household income, March 2014

Importance of Family

Key points
Importance of family
Sitting together as a family for dinner is important to Hispanics
Family is important even when they live far away
Watching TV together as a family less important as Hispanics are more acculturated
Shopping as a family more important among less acculturated Hispanics
Figure 54: Importance of family among Hispanics, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Hispanic women are the glue that keeps the family together
Figure 55: Importance of family among Hispanics, by gender, March 2014

Importance of Spanish

Key points
The majority of Hispanics are bilingual
Figure 56: Language spoken at home, July 2012- September 2012
Importance of Spanish
Figure 57: Importance of Spanish language among Hispanics, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Importance of Spanish increases among older Hispanics
Figure 58: Importance of Spanish language among Hispanics, by age, March 2014
Importance of activities in Spanish decreases with income
Figure 59: Importance of Spanish language among Hispanics, by household income, March 2014

Why Hispanics are Becoming More Bicultural

Key points
For the majority of Hispanics, this is home
Figure 60: Hispanics’ future plans, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Hispanics enjoy living the American lifestyle and customs
Figure 61: Hispanics’ culture and lifestyle, by gender, November 2012-December 2013
A little English helps Hispanics enjoy what the American culture has to offer
Figure 62: Hispanics’ culture and lifestyle, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013
From tamales to mac & cheese, Hispanics like it all
Figure 63: Hispanics’ eating habits, by age, November 2012-December 2013
The majority of Hispanics enjoy traditional Hispanic foods, but prepare them less frequently as they become more acculturated
Figure 64: Hispanics’ eating habits, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013
Hispanics celebrate US holidays with a twist
Figure 65: Hispanics’ culture and lifestyle, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013
A note about Cinco de Mayo
The role of social networks keeping Hispanics connected to their Hispanic roots
Figure 66: Attitudes toward social networks – Latin culture – Any agree, by level of acculturation, March 2014

Social Life

Key points
Family gatherings are an important part of Hispanics’ lives
Figure 67: Hispanics’ social life, by gender, November 2012-December 2013
When Spanish is lost, so is an important link to Latino roots
Figure 68: Hispanics’ social life, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013
Birds of a feather flock together
Figure 69: People Hispanics spend time with, unacculturated Hispanics, March 2014
Bicultural Hispanics still relate mainly with other Hispanics at home
Figure 70: People Hispanics spend time with, bicultural Hispanics, March 2014
Acculturated Hispanics live in an English-language world
Figure 71: People Hispanics spend time with, acculturated Hispanics, March 2014

Political Views

Key points
Hispanics skew conservative but use a different definition
Figure 72: Hispanics’ political outlook, by age, November 2012-December 2013
Slightly more than half of Hispanics are registered to vote
Figure 73: Hispanics registered to vote, by age, November 2012-December 2013
The majority of Hispanics not registered to vote may not be eligible yet
Figure 74: Hispanics registered to vote, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013
Hispanics lean Democrat
Figure 75: Hispanics’ political party registration, by gender, November 2012-December 2013
While moderate, Republicans’ appeal increases among English-dominant Hispanics
Figure 76: Hispanics’ political party registration, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013

Religious Views

Key points
The majority of Hispanics are still Catholic…
Figure 77: Hispanics and religion, by age, November 2012-December 2013
… but preference declines as English begins to dominate
Figure 78: Hispanics and religion, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013

Language and the Media

Key points
Spanish-language magazines and newspapers have a clear niche
Figure 79: Language and the media among Hispanics – books, magazines, or newspapers, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013
As long as some Spanish is spoken, Spanish-language programming has its charm
Figure 80: Language and the media among Hispanics – television, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013
Radio preferences are also driven by mood
Figure 81: Language and the media among Hispanics – radio, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013
English is preferred to go online
Figure 82: Language and the media among Hispanics – websites, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013
Using Spanish helps to rally Spanish-dominant Hispanics
Figure 83: Attitudes toward language and media, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013

Acculturation

What is acculturation?
Figure 84: Acculturation diagram
Figure 85: Variables that affect acculturation
Why is level of acculturation important?
Levels of acculturation
Figure 86: Characteristics of primary acculturation levels
What is retroacculturation?

Appendix: Other Useful Consumer Tables

Importance of Spanish language
Figure 87: Importance of Spanish language among Hispanics, by gender, March 2014
Figure 88: Importance of Spanish language among Hispanics, by language primarily spoken in the home, March 2014
Figure 89: Importance of Spanish language among Hispanics, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Importance of family
Figure 90: Importance of family among Hispanics, by age, March 2014
Figure 91: Importance of family among Hispanics, by household income, March 2014
Figure 92: Importance of family among Hispanics, by language primarily spoken in the home, March 2014
Figure 93: Importance of family among Hispanics, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Importance of values and traditions
Figure 94: Importance of values and traditions among Hispanics, by age, March 2014
Figure 95: Importance of values and traditions among Hispanics, by language primarily spoken in the home, March 2014
Figure 96: Importance of values and traditions among Hispanics, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Future plans
Figure 97: Future plans, by gender, March 2014
Figure 98: Future plans, by language primarily spoken in the home, March 2014
Figure 99: Future plans, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Phrases used to describe yourself
Figure 100: Phrases used by Hispanics to describe themselves – Top 2 Box, by gender, March 2014
Figure 101: Phrases used by Hispanics to describe themselves – Top 2 Box, by household income, March 2014
Figure 102: Phrases used by Hispanics to describe themselves – Top 2 Box, by language primarily spoken in the home, March 2014
Phrases used to describe typical American
Figure 103: Phrases Hispanics use to describe the typical American– Top 2 Box, by gender, March 2014
Figure 104: Phrases Hispanics use to describe the typical American– Top 2 Box, by age, March 2014
Figure 105: Phrases Hispanics use to describe the typical American– Top 2 Box, by household income, March 2014
Figure 106: Phrases Hispanics use to describe the typical American– Top 2 Box, by language primarily spoken in the home, March 2014
Figure 107: Phrases Hispanics use to describe the typical American– Top 2 Box, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Why Hispanics are bicultural
Figure 108: Hispanics’ culture and lifestyle, by gender, November 2012-December 2013
Figure 109: Hispanics’ culture and lifestyle, by gender, November 2012-December 2013
People spend time with
Figure 110: People Hispanics spend time with – At home, by gender, March 2014
Figure 111: People Hispanics spend time with – At home, by age, March 2014
Figure 112: People Hispanics spend time with – At home, by household income, March 2014
Figure 113: People Hispanics spend time with – At home, by language primarily spoken in the home, March 2014
Figure 114: People Hispanics spend time with – At home, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Figure 115: People Hispanics spend time with – Out of home (not at work), by gender, March 2014
Figure 116: People Hispanics spend time with – Out of home (not at work), by age, March 2014
Figure 117: People Hispanics spend time with – Out of home (not at work), by household income, March 2014
Figure 118: People Hispanics spend time with – Out of home (not at work), by language primarily spoken in the home, March 2014
Figure 119: People Hispanics spend time with – Out of home (not at work), by level of acculturation, March 2014
Figure 120: People Hispanics spend time with – At work, by gender, March 2014
Figure 121: People Hispanics spend time with – At work, by age, March 2014
Figure 122: People Hispanics spend time with – At work, by household income, March 2014
Figure 123: People Hispanics spend time with – At work, by language primarily spoken in the home, March 2014
Figure 124: People Hispanics spend time with – At work, by level of acculturation, March 2014
Political views
Figure 125: Hispanics’ political outlook, by gender, November 2012-December 2013
Figure 126: Hispanics’ political outlook, by languages spoken in home, November 2012-December 2013
Figure 127: Hispanics Registered to vote, by gender, November 2012-December 2013
Language and the media
Figure 128: Language and the media among Hispanics – Books, magazines, or newspapers, by gender, November 2012-December 2013
Figure 129: Language and the media among Hispanics – television, by gender, November 2012-December 2013
Figure 130: Language and the media among Hispanics – radio, by gender, November 2012-December 2013
Figure 131: Language and the media among Hispanics – websites, by gender, November 2012-December 2013
Figure 132: Attitudes toward language and media, by gender, November 2012-December 2013

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