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Facial Skincare - US - May 2014

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : May 2014

Category :

Skincare

No. of Pages : 194 Pages


Despite slow sales growth and the highly saturated nature of the facial skincare category, the market does hold opportunities for products that emphasize gentle skincare, function, and convenience. At the same time, the changing landscape of the facial skincare category presents both challenges and opportunities for brands and retailers to reinvent the traditional category segmentation.
Table of Content

Scope and Themes
What you need to know
Definition
Data sources
Sales data
Consumer survey data
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations

Executive Summary
The market
Figure 1: Total US sales and fan chart forecast of facial skincare, at current prices, 2008-18
Market factors
Hispanic and Asian consumers drive category usage
Figure 2: Regular use of facial skincare products, by race/Hispanic origin, March 2014
Changing regulations have implications
Segment performance
Figure 3: Total US retail sales of facial skincare, by segment, at current prices, 2011 and 2013
The consumer
Facial moisturizers have highest regular reported use
Figure 4: Regular use of facial skincare products, March 2014
Reasons for using facial skincare vary depending on product type
Figure 5: Top five reasons for using facial skincare, listed in accordance with cleansing product rankings, March 2014
Facial skincare users seek functional benefits
Figure 6: Top five reasons for choosing facial skincare, March 2014
Lifestage appropriate, ultra-gentle products generate highest levels of interest
Figure 7: Any interest in top five facial skincare benefits, by gender, March 2014
What we think

Issues and Insights
Lines are blurring between facial skincare segments
The issues
The implications
Men are below-average users of facial skincare
The issues
The implications
Category growth is slow
The issues
The implications

Trend Application
Trend: Factory Fear
Trend: Prepare for the Worst
Trend: Many Mes

Market Size and Forecast
Key points
Competitive environment results in slow category growth
Facial skincare expected to see minimal gains
Sales and forecast of facial skincare
Figure 8: Total US sales and forecast of facial skincare, at current prices, 2008-18
Figure 9: Total US sales and forecast of facial skincare, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2008-18
Fan chart forecast
Figure 10: Total US sales and fan chart forecast of facial skincare, at current prices, 2008-18

Market Drivers
Key points
Improving economy should benefit facial skincare
Figure 11: University of Michigan’s index of consumer sentiment (ICS), 2007-14
Figure 12: Regular use of facial skincare products, by household income, March 2014
Hispanic and Asian consumers are heaviest users of facial skincare
Figure 13: Regular use of facial skincare products, by race/Hispanic origin, March 2014
Figure 14: Population by race and Hispanic origin, 2009-19
Figure 15: Household income distribution, by race and Hispanic origin of householder, 2012
Changing regulatory environment could have implications for category

Segment Performance
Key points
Anti-aging is largest segment, though sales are struggling
Facial cleansers, moisturizers are strongest performing segments
Sales of facial skincare, by segment
Figure 16: Total US retail sales of facial skincare, by segment, at current prices, 2011 and 2013

Segment Performance – Anti-aging
Key points
Anti-aging skincare struggles to grow
Sales and forecast of anti-aging skincare
Figure 17: Total US sales and forecast of anti-aging skincare, at current prices, 2008-18

Segment Performance – Facial Cleansers
Key points
Facial cleansers post solid sales gains
Sales and forecast of facial cleansers
Figure 18: Total US sales and forecast of facial cleansers, at current prices, 2008-18

Segment Performance – Acne Treatments
Key points
Slow yet steady gains expected for acne treatments
Sales and forecast of acne treatments
Figure 19: Total US sales and forecast of acne treatments, at current prices, 2008-18

Segment Performance – Facial Moisturizers
Key points
Despite overlap with anti-aging, moisturizer sales are growing
Sales and forecast of facial moisturizers
Figure 20: Total US sales and forecast of facial moisturizers, at current prices, 2008-18

Segment Performance – Fade/Bleach
Key points
Fade/bleach losing share to other skincare segments
Sales and forecast of fade/bleach
Figure 21: Total US sales and forecast of fade/bleach, at current prices, 2008-18

Retail Channels
Key points
Sales growth is slow across all retail channels
Sales of facial skincare, by channel
Figure 22: Total US retail sales of facial skincare, by channel, at current prices, 2011-13
Improving retail experience will be essential to driving future growth
Figure 23: Total US retail sales of facial skincare, by channel, at current prices, 2008-13

Leading Companies
Key points
J&J leads facial skincare category
P&G’s struggles continue
L’Oréal, Unilever, and Galderma all post sales gains
Manufacturer sales of facial skincare
Figure 24: MULO sales of facial skincare products, by leading companies, rolling 52-weeks 2013 and 2014

Brand Share – Anti-aging
Key points
P&G’s Olay continues to decline
L’Oréal and J&J experience modest gains
Manufacturer sales of anti-aging skincare
Figure 25: MULO sales of anti-aging skincare, by leading companies, rolling 52 weeks 2013 and 2014
Figure 26: Key purchase measure for the top brands of facial anti-aging, by household penetration, 52 weeks ending Dec. 29, 2013 (current) and Dec. 30, 2013 (year ago)

Brand Share – Facial Cleansers
Key points
J&J leads facial cleansing segment
Gentle skincare products boost sales for Unilever, Galderma
P&G continues to lose ground
Manufacturer sales of facial cleansers
Figure 27: MULO sales of facial cleansers, by leading companies, rolling 52 weeks 2013 and 2014
Figure 28: Key purchase measure for the top brands of facial cleansers, by household penetration, 52 weeks ending Dec. 29, 2013 (current) and Dec. 30, 2013 (year ago)

Brand Share – Acne Treatments
Key points
J&J dominates acne treatments, though struggles to grow sales
Private label posting gains in an otherwise slow growth segment
Manufacturer sales of acne treatments
Figure 29: MULO sales of acne treatment, by leading companies, rolling 52 weeks 2013 and 2014
Figure 30: Key purchase measure for the top brands of acne treatments, by household penetration, 52 weeks ending Dec. 29, 2013 (current) and Dec. 30, 2013 (year ago)

Brand Share – Facial Moisturizers
Key points
J&J leads segment, posts gains in sales and share
P&G’s woes continue
Gentle skincare brands continue to gain ground
Manufacturer sales of facial moisturizers
Figure 31: MULO sales of facial moisturizers, by leading companies, rolling 52 weeks 2013 and 2014
Figure 32: Key purchase measure for the top brands of facial moisturizers, by household penetration, 52 weeks ending Dec. 29, 2013 (current) and Dec. 30, 2013 (year ago)

Brand Share – Fade/Bleach
Key points
Sales are fading for segment leaders
Smaller brands, private label are winners in overall struggling segment
Manufacturer sales of fade/bleach
Figure 33: MULO sales of fade/bleach, by leading companies, rolling 52 weeks 2013 and 2014

Innovations and Innovators
New product launch trends
Figure 34: Top 20 facial skincare claims, by share, 2009-14
Category innovations
Eyebrow treatments
Fragrance-free
Instant results
Masks
Figure 35: Target masque bar ad, 2014
Night-specific products
Powders

Marketing Strategies
Overview of the brand landscape
Celebrity endorsements
Figure 36: Neutrogena Ultra Gentle Daily Cleanser TV ad, 2013
Figure 37: Aveeno Positively Radiant print ad, 2014
Marketing to men
“Selfie” culture impacts facial skincare
Figure 38: L’Oréal Revitalift Miracle Blur TV ad, 2013

Social Media
Key points
Market overview
Key social media metrics
Figure 39: Key performance indicators, selected facial skincare brands, March 31, 2013-March 30, 2014
Brand usage and awareness
Figure 40: Brand usage and awareness of facial skincare brands, March 2014
Interaction with brands
Figure 41: Interaction with facial skincare brands, March 2014
Leading online campaigns
Branded content
Real-time marketing
Relevant corporate blogs
What we think
Online conversations
Figure 42: Online mentions, selected facial skincare brands, March 31, 2013-March 30, 2014
Where are people talking about facial skincare brands?
Figure 43: Mentions, by page type, selected facial skincare brands, March 31, 2013-March 30, 2014
What are people talking about online?
Figure 44: Mentions, by topic of conversation, selected facial skincare brands, March 31, 2013-March 30, 2014

Use of Facial Cleansing Products
Key points
Facial cleansers enjoy regular usage
Women, younger shoppers more likely to use most facial cleansing products
Figure 45: Use of facial cleansing products, March 2014
Figure 46: Regular use of facial cleansing products, by gender, March 2014
Figure 47: Regular use of facial cleansing products, by age, March 2014
Majority of facial cleansing formats experiencing an uptick in usage
Figure 48: Types of facial cleansers/toners used, October 2007-December 2013
Neutrogena is most used facial cleansing brand
Figure 49: Top 15 brands used of facial cleansers/toners, October 2007-December 2013
Users of facial cleansing products want healthy-looking skin
Figure 50: Reasons for using facial cleansing products, by gender, March 2014
Figure 51: Reasons for using facial cleansing products, by age, March 2014

Use of Facial Moisturizer
Key points
More than four out of 10 consumers use facial moisturizers regularly
Women drive usage of facial moisturizer
Figure 52: Use of facial moisturizer, March 2014
Figure 53: Regular use of facial moisturizer, by gender and by age, March 2014
Treating dry skin and skin health are primary reasons for using moisturizer
Figure 54: Reasons for using facial moisturizer, by gender, March 2014
Figure 55: Reasons for using facial moisturizer, by age, March 2014

Use of Multiple-benefit Products
Key points
Multiple-benefit products more likely to be occasional-use items
Figure 56: Use of multiple-benefit products, March 2014
Users of multiple-benefit products want even skin tone
Figure 57: Reasons for using multiple-benefit products, by gender, March 2014
Figure 58: Regular use of multiple-benefit products, by age, March 2014
Figure 59: Reasons for using multiple-benefit products, by age, March 2014

Use of Specialty Skincare Products
Key points
Usage frequency varies by product type
Figure 60: Any use of acne treatments and facial masks/peels, February 2013 and March 2014
Figure 61: Use of specialty skincare products, March 2014
Acne treatment is top priority for specialty skincare users
Figure 62: Reasons for using specialty/treatment products, by gender, March 2014
Figure 63: Reasons for using specialty/treatment products, by age, March 2014

Use of Facial Skincare Products Based on Brand Usage
Key point
Brand use reflects differences in product use
Figure 64: Regular use of facial skincare products, by use or aware of facial skincare brands, March 2014

Shopping for Facial Skincare
Key points
Shopping behavior differs by lifestage
Figure 65: Shopping for facial skincare, by gender, March 2014
Figure 66: Shopping for facial skincare, by age, March 2014

Choosing Facial Skincare Products
Key points
Facial skincare users seek function
Multiple-benefit products are important to female shoppers
Male shoppers motivated by convenience
Figure 67: Choosing facial skincare, by gender, March 2014
Figure 68: Choosing facial skincare, by age, March 2014

Interest in Product Claims and Formats
Key points
Majority of respondents interested in lifestage appropriate products
Figure 69: Interest in facial skincare benefits, March 2014
Interest in ultra-gentle products consistent with growing category trend
Figure 70: Share of MULO sales of select sensitive and gentle skincare products, by segment, 2009-13
Figure 71: Any interest in facial skincare benefits, by gender, March 2014
Men, younger consumers interested in functional benefits, convenience
Figure 72: Any interest in facial skincare benefits, by age, March 2014

Attitudes Toward Facial Skincare
Key points
Women are concerned about the impact of lifestyle on their skin
Roughly one third of women have a multi-step skincare routine
Figure 73: Attitudes toward facial skincare, by gender, March 2014
Older consumers more likely to be skeptical about the need for anti-aging products
Figure 74: Attitudes toward facial skincare, by age, March 2014

Race and Hispanic Origin
Key points
Hispanic and Asian consumers highly engaged in facial skincare
Figure 75: Regular use of facial skincare products, by race/Hispanic origin, March 2014
Black shoppers look for sensitive skin and ethnic-specific products
Figure 76: Choosing facial skincare, by race/Hispanic origin, March 2014
On-the-go purchasing appeals to multicultural consumers
Figure 77: Any interest in facial skincare benefits, by race/Hispanic origin, March 2014

Appendix – Other Useful Consumer Tables
Usage of facial skincare products
Figure 78: Use of facial skincare products, March 2014
Figure 79: Regular use of facial skincare products, by gender, March 2014
Figure 80: Occasional use of facial skincare products, by gender, March 2014
Figure 81: Occasional use of facial skincare products, by age, March 2014
Reasons for using facial skincare
Figure 82: Reasons for using facial skincare, March 2014
Figure 83: Reasons for using facial cleansing products, by race/Hispanic origin, March 2014
Figure 84: Reasons for using facial moisturizer, by race/Hispanic origin, March 2014
Figure 85: Reasons for using multiple-benefit products, by race/Hispanic origin, March 2014
Figure 86: Reasons for using specialty/treatment products, by race/Hispanic origin, March 2014
Shopping for facial skincare
Figure 87: Shopping for facial skincare, by race/Hispanic origin, March 2014
Attitudes toward facial skincare
Figure 88: Attitudes toward facial skincare, by race/Hispanic origin, March 2014

Appendix – Social Media
Online conversations
Figure 89: Online mentions, selected facial skincare brands, March 31, 2013-March 30, 2014
Brand analysis
Figure 90: Clinique key social media indicators, April 2014
Figure 91: Olay key social media indicators, April 2014
Figure 92: Clean & Clear key social media indicators, April 2014
Figure 93: Mary Kay key social media indicators, April 2014
Figure 94: Murad key social media indicators, April 2014
Figure 95: Boots No7 key social media indicators, April 2014
Brand usage or awareness
Figure 96: Brand usage or awareness, March 2014
Figure 97: Olay usage or awareness, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 98: Mary Kay usage or awareness, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 99: Clean & Clear usage or awareness, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 100: Clinique usage or awareness, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 101: Boots No7 usage or awareness, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 102: Murad usage or awareness, by demographics, March 2014
Activities done
Figure 103: Social media interaction with facial skincare brands, March 2014
Figure 104: Olay – Activities done – I have looked up/talked about this brand online on social media, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 105: Olay – Activities done – I have contacted/interacted with the brand online on social media to, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 106: Olay – Activities done – I follow/like the brand on social media because, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 107: Olay – Activities done – I have researched the brand on social media to, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 108: Mary Kay – Activities done – I have looked up/talked about this brand online on social media, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 109: Mary Kay – Activities done – I have contacted/interacted with the brand online on social media to, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 110: Mary Kay – Activities done – I follow/like the brand on social media because, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 111: Mary Kay – Activities done – I have researched the brand on social media to, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 112: Clean & Clear – Activities done – I have looked up/talked about this brand online on social media, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 113: Clean & Clear – Activities done – I have contacted/interacted with the brand online on social media to, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 114: Clean & Clear – Activities done – I follow/like the brand on social media because, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 115: Clean & Clear – Activities done – I have researched the brand on social media to, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 116: Clinique – Activities done – I have looked up/talked about this brand online on social media, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 117: Clinique – Activities done – I have contacted/interacted with the brand online on social media to, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 118: Clinique – Activities done – I follow/like the brand on social media because, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 119: Clinique – Activities done – I have researched the brand on social media to, by demographics, March 2014
Figure 120: Murad – Activities done – I have looked up/talked about this brand online on social media, by demographics, March 2014

Appendix – Information Resources Inc. Builders Panel Data Definitions
Information Resources Inc. Consumer Network Metrics

Appendix – Trade Associations

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