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Energy and Sports Drinks - Canada - August 2015

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Aug 2015

Category :

Non-Alcoholic Drinks

No. of Pages : N/A


The challenge for energy drink brands is altering negative perceptions of their authenticity, as well as their negative side effects. Naturally sourced ingredients in energy and sports drinks are important to consumers, as is providing validity to the benefits of these ingredients and documentation of their origins through multimedia channels.

Introduction

Definition
Excluded
Abbreviations

Executive Summary

Market drivers
Canada’s population is ageing and will continue to do so in the coming years
Figure 1: Population aged 65 years and over in Canada, historical and projected (% of total), 1971-2061
The consumer
Sports drink consumption dominates
Figure 2: Energy and sports drinks usage (nets), April 2015
Males aged 18-34 are among the largest consumers of energy and sports drinks
Figure 3: Energy and sports drinks usage, April 2015
Canadians typically consume energy drinks at work, pre/post/during exercise and/or on the go
Figure 4: Energy drink/shot usage occasions, April 2015
Sports drinks are most likely to be drunk before, during or after a workout/participating in a sport
Figure 5: Sports drinks usage occasions, April 2015
Summary of interest in new/emerging sports and energy drinks
Figure 6: Interest in new or emerging energy and sports drink concepts, April 2015
Summary of attitudes towards energy and sports drinks
Figure 7: Summary of attitudes towards energy and sports drinks, April 2015
Canadian lifestyles are polarised
Figure 8: Summary of lifestyle statements, April 2015
What we think

Issues and Insights

Changing negative perceptions of energy drinks
The facts
The implications
Reaching the Disengaged consumer
The facts
The implications
Increasing the use of natural ingredients in energy and sports drinks
The facts
The implications
Providing consumption guidelines and more nutritional information
The facts
The implications

Trend Application

Factory Fear
Prove It
Guiding Choice

Market Drivers

Key points
Economic overview
Overall negative impact of lower oil prices on the Canadian economy
Figure 9: Canada’s GDP, by quarter, Q4 2008-Q4 2014
Figure 10: Household disposable incomes and savings in Canada, by quarter, Q4 2008-Q4 2014
Figure 11: Canada’s unemployment rate, by gender, January 2008-January 2015
Impact of inflation and exchange rates
Figure 12: Inflation rates in Canada (%), 2004-14
Outlook on the real estate and housing market
Consumer confidence
Figure 13: Consumer Confidence Index, monthly, January 2008-February 2015
Household debt in Canada
Demographic overview
Population count and growth in Canada
Figure 14: Share of population of Canada, by territory/province, 2015 (projected)
Minority groups account for less than 20% of Canada’s population
Figure 15: Estimated population of Canada, by ethnicity, 2011
Canada’s population is expected to age in the coming years
Figure 16: Population aged 65 years and over in Canada, historical and projected (% of total), 1971-2061
Figure 17: Projected trends in the age structure of the Canada population, 2014-19

Who’s Innovating?

Key points
Overall launch increase of energy drinks supported by new products
Figure 18: Percentage of energy drink launches in Canada, by launch type, 2012-14
New sports drink products saw progressive increase in launches
Figure 19: Percentage of sports drink launches in Canada, by launch type, 2012-14
Natural ingredient claims grow
Demand high for natural energy and sports drinks
Figure 20: Runa Berry Clean Energy Sparkling Drink, March 2014
Figure 21: Runa Clean Energy Original Energy Sparkling Drink, April 2014
Alternative ingredients are being explored
Figure 22: Starbucks Refreshers Blueberry Acai Sparkling Green Coffee Beverage, May 2014
Sports drinks geared around physical activity
Figure 23: RE7 Performance Recovery Drink, October 2014

Market Size and Forecast

Key points
Energy and sports drink market to see slow but steady growth in sales
Figure 24: Canada value sales of energy and sports drinks, at current and constant prices, total market, 2010-20
Figure 25: Canada volume sales of energy and sports drinks, total market, 2010-20
Figure 26: Forecast of total value sales of energy and sports drinks, 2010-20
Figure 27: Forecast of total volume sales of energy and sports drinks, 2010-20
Energy drinks are to see growth rates of 1-3% between 2015 and 2020
Figure 28: Canada value sales of energy drinks, at current and constant prices, 2010-20
Figure 29: Canada volume sales of energy drinks, 2010-20
Figure 30: Forecast of value sales of energy drinks, 2010-20
Figure 31: Forecast of volume sales of energy drinks, 2010-20
Sports drinks to grow slow and steadily through 2020
Figure 32: Canada value sales for sports drinks, at current and constant prices, 2010-20
Figure 33: Canada volume sales for sports drinks, 2010-20
Figure 34: Forecast of value sales for sports drinks, 2010-20
Figure 35: Forecast of volume sales for sports drinks, 2010-20
Forecast methodology

Market Segmentation and Share

Key points
Regular energy drinks dominated value sales and volume
Figure 36: Canada volume sales (m litres) of energy drinks, 2011-14
Figure 37: Canada value sales (m CAD) of energy drinks, 2011-14
Monster Beverage Corporation led in volume for energy drinks while Red Bull GmbH took the largest share in value sales
Figure 38: Company retail market share, by volume (%), energy drinks, 2011-14
Figure 39: Company retail market share, by value (%), energy drinks, 2011-14
Liquid/ready to drink made up the vast majority of the market for sports drinks
Figure 40: Canada volume sales (m litres) of sports drinks, 2011-14
Figure 41: Canada value sales (m CAD) of sports drinks, 2011-14
PepsiCo reigns as the dominant market player in sports drinks in Canada, leading in volume and value sales
Figure 42: Company retail market share, by volume (%), sports drinks, 2012-14
Figure 43: Company retail market share, by value (%), sports drinks, 2012-14

Companies and Products

Red Bull
Overview and company information
Recent activity
Gatorade
Overview and company information
Recent activity
Powerade
Overview and company information
Recent activity
Monster Energy
Overview and company information
Recent activity
Starbucks
Overview and company information
Recent activity
5-hour Energy
Overview and company information
Recent activity

Social Media – Energy and Sports Drinks

Key findings
Market overview
Key social media metrics
Figure 44: Key social media metrics, August 2015
Brand usage and awareness
Figure 45: Brand usage and awareness for selected energy and sports drink brands, April 2015
Interactions with energy and sports drink brands
Figure 46: Interactions with selected energy and sports drink brands, April 2015
Social media activity and campaigns
What we think
Online conversations
Figure 47: Online conversations for selected energy and sports drink brands, by day, July 30, 2014-July 30, 2015
Where are people talking about energy and sports drink brands?
Figure 48: Online conversations for selected energy and sports drink brands, by page type, July 30, 2014-July 30, 2015
What are people talking about?
Figure 49: Topics of conversation around selected energy and sports drink brands, July 30, 2014-July 30, 2015

The Consumer – Usage of Energy and Sports Drinks

Key points
Sports drink consumption dominates
Figure 50: Energy and sports drinks usage (nets), April 2015
Males aged 18-34 are among the largest consumers of energy and sports drinks
Figure 51: Energy and sports drinks usage, April 2015
Close to a third of consumers have consumed one or two types of energy/sports drinks
Figure 52: Repertoire of energy and sports drinks usage, April 2015

The Consumer – Energy and Sports Drink Occasions

Key points
Canadians typically consume energy drinks at work, pre/post/during exercise and/or on the go
Figure 53: Energy drink/shot usage occasions, April 2015
Sports drinks are most likely to be drunk before, during or after a workout/participating in a sport
Figure 54: Sports drinks usage occasions, April 2015

The Consumer – New or Emerging Energy and Sports Drink Concepts

Key points
Summary of interest in new/emerging sports and energy drinks
Figure 55: Interest in new or emerging energy and sports drink concepts, April 2015
There is great interest in all-natural ingredients
Figure 56: Interest in more natural energy and sports drink concepts, April 2015
Alternative ingredients are appealing
Figure 57: Interest in ingredient-based new or emerging energy and sports drink concepts, April 2015
Younger consumers are more interested in drinks in different concentrations
Figure 58: Interest in new or emerging energy and sports drink concepts (concentration-specific), April 2015

The Consumer – Attitudes towards Energy and Sports Drinks

Key points
Summary of attitudes towards energy and sports drinks
Figure 59: Summary of attitudes towards energy and sports drinks, April 2015
Natural beverages are preferred over sports drinks
Figure 60: Attitudes towards sports drinks, April 2015
More information is needed to help consumers feel comfortable with energy drinks
Figure 61: Attitudes towards energy drink ingredients, April 2015
Consumers are interested in new varieties of energy drinks
Figure 62: Attitudes towards energy drink (selected), April 2015

The Consumer – Lifestyle Statements

Key points
Canadian lifestyles are polarised
Figure 63: Summary of lifestyle statements, April 2015
Consumers are watching their weight and staying physically fit
Figure 64: Lifestyle statements, April 2015
Figure 65: Lifestyle statements, April 2015

The Consumer – Target Groups

Key points
Four target groups
Figure 66: Target groups, April 2015
The Demanding (30%)
Disengaged (26%)
The Overly Cautious (24%)
Energy Drink Enthusiasts (20%)

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