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Children and Teens as Influencers - UK - May 2015

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : May 2015

Category :

Lifestyle

No. of Pages : 71 Pages

Today’s kids and teens crave novelty like no generation before them, owing to the speed of innovation, early exposure to the internet and ubiquitous advertising. Impressionable and fickle, children could benefit from a more balanced perspective on how shopping decisions are made – something that will allow them to grow up into more discerning consumers.
Table of Content

Introduction

Abbreviations

Executive Summary

The strength of pester power
Figure 1: Items kids and teens asked their parents for when shopping together in the last month, March 2015
Children’s opinions matter in modern families
Figure 2: How often parents ask for their children’s opinion when making purchases, March 2015
Parents’ advice carries the most weight
Figure 3: People that children and teens are influenced by when choosing new items, March 2015
Searching for novelty
Figure 4: Attitudes of children and teens – Friendships and new products, March 2015
What we think

Issues and Insights

Assessing the strength of children’s pester power
The facts
The implications
Children’s influence over purchases for the household
The facts
The implications
Influence of advertising on children
The facts
The implications

Market Drivers

Key points
Trends in the age structure of the UK population
Figure 5: Trends in the age structure of the UK population, 2009-19
Trends in family types
Figure 6: People in households, by type of household and family, UK, 2009-14
Number of siblings
Figure 7: Number of siblings, March 2015
Childhood obesity
Figure 8: Children’s overweight and obesity prevalence, by age, England, 2013
Figure 9: le FabShop – “Open Toys” project, April 2015
Trends in children’s physical activity
Figure 10: Proportion of children meeting recommendations for physical activity, by age and gender, England, 2008 and 2012
Devices children miss the most
Figure 11: Device children would miss the most, by age, April-June 2014
Usage of technology devices at home
Figure 12: Technology devices kids and teens use at home, 2013 and 2015
Social media use
Figure 13: Social media and apps used by kids and teens in the past month, March 2015

The Consumer – Pester Power – The Parents’ Perspective

Key points
Nearly nine in 10 kids and teens ask their parents to buy them something when shopping together
Figure 14: Items kids and teens asked their parents for when shopping together in the last month, March 2015
The strength of children’s pester power
Figure 15: Proportion of parents who bought items their child asked for in the last month, March 2015
Children’s influence rises with age
Figure 16: Proportion of parents who bought items their child asked for in the last month, by children’s age, March 2015
Effect of pester power on parental spending
Figure 17: Amount of money parents spent on items children asked for in the last month (mean amounts per item), March 2015
Dads and higher-earning parents spend more on their offspring
Figure 18: Amount of money parents spent on selected items children asked for in the last month (mean amounts per item), by gender of parent and annual household income, March 2015

The Consumer – Children’s Influence on Family Purchases and Activities

Key points
Children’s voices are strong in modern families
Figure 19: How often parents ask for their children’s opinion when making purchases, March 2015
Influence over family purchases rises with age
Figure 20: Proportion of parents who ask for their children’s opinion most of the time or sometimes when making selected purchases, by children’s age and gender, March 2015
Factoring kids’ opinions into family leisure time
Figure 21: How often parents ask for their children’s opinion when planning family activities, March 2015

The Consumer – Parenting Strategies

Key points
Parents see themselves as disciplinarians
Figure 22: Parents’ attitudes, March 2015
Higher-income parents take a more relaxed approach to spending on their children
Figure 23: Selected parents’ attitudes, by annual household income, March 2015
Parents spend more freely on only children
Figure 24: Selected parents’ attitudes, by presence of siblings, March 2015
CHAID analysis
Methodology
Figure 25: Children and teens as influencers – CHAID – Tree output, March 2015
Figure 26: Children and teens as influencers – CHAID – Tree output, March 2015
Rising brand awareness – A part of growing up
Figure 27: Selected parents’ attitudes, by children’s age, March 2015

The Consumer – Who Kids are Influenced By

Key points
Opinions of mum and dad carry the most weight
Figure 28: People that children and teens are influenced by when choosing new items, March 2015
Parental influence wanes with children’s age
Figure 29: People that children and teens are influenced by when choosing new items (Nets across all categories are shown), by children’s age, March 2015
Parental anxieties over age-inappropriate content
Figure 30: People that children and teens are influenced by when deciding what to do in their leisure time, March 2015

The Consumer – The Power of Advertising

Key points
Advertising to children – A tricky task
Figure 31: Subway’s ‘Playtime: Powered by Veggies’ campaign, April 2015
Children are a captive audience for TV
Figure 32: Places where kids and teens recall seeing advertising, March 2015
Internet – Threat or opportunity?
Figure 33: Places where kids and teens recall seeing advertising, by children’s age, March 2015

The Consumer – Kids’ and Teens’ Attitudes

Key points
Modern British families are very close
Figure 34: Attitudes of children and teens – Relationship with parents, March 2015
In search of novelty
Figure 35: Attitudes of children and teens – Friendships and new products, March 2015

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