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BREAKFAST FOODS - US - JULY 2018

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Jul 2018

Category :

Food

No. of Pages : N/A

Boosting the importance of breakfast is in order. Only about half of US adults think breakfast is more important than lunch or dinner, down from 2014, and less than half say it sets the tone for their day. Nevertheless, consumption is high. Opportunity for portable options is strong, with few weekday breakfast eaters doing so while in transit, others doing so at their destination. Foodservice occasions spike on weekends.

Table of contents
OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Breakfast dips as most important meal of the day
Figure 1: Meal statements, 2014 and 2018
Busy schedules are most likely to blame for skipping breakfast
One in five younger adults eats breakfast while in transit
Figure 2: Breakfast consumption – Any day, by age, April 2018
The opportunities
Breakfast players should keep snackers in mind
Figure 3: Breakfast attitudes/behaviors – Snack, by age, April 2018
Health leads breakfast attributes of interest, followed by convenience
Figure 4: Breakfast attributes, April 2018
The highest percentage of respondents say a healthy breakfast is high in protein
Figure 5: Healthy breakfast, April 2018
What it means
THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Breakfast dips as most important meal of the day
Busy schedules are most likely to blame for skipping breakfast
Breakfast food manufacturers should keep snackers in mind
Three quarters of adults are currently managing their weight
MARKET FACTORS
Breakfast dips as most important meal of the day
Figure 6: Meal statements, 2014 and 2018
Busy schedules are most likely to blame for skipping breakfast
Less than half of breakfast eaters say breakfast sets the tone for the day
Figure 7: Breakfast attitudes/behaviors – Tone, April 2018
Figure 8: Breakfast attitudes/behaviors – Tone, by age, April 2018
Messaging related to productivity and health may resonate
Breakfast food manufacturers should keep snackers in mind
Figure 9: Snacking frequency, March 2017
Three quarters of adults are currently managing their weight
Figure 10: Weight management status, July 2017
KEY PLAYERS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Cereal continues to lead breakfast launches
Clean claims are on the rise
Frozen launches decline
“Healthy” breakfast items fall short on consumer appeal
WHAT’S WORKING?
Cereal continues to lead breakfast launches
Figure 11: Food and drink launches featuring the word “breakfast,” by leading subcategories, 2013-18*
Clean claims are on the rise
Figure 12: Food and drink launches featuring the word “breakfast,” by leading claims, 2013-18*
Figure 13: Food and drink launches featuring the word “breakfast,” by fastest growing claims, 2013-18*
Purchase intent is highest for breakfast splurges
WHAT’S STRUGGLING?
Frozen launches decline
Figure 14: Food and drink launches featuring the word “breakfast,” by storage type, 2013-18*
Healthy items don’t garner particularly high purchase intent
Convenience items don’t score well for health
WHAT’S NEXT?
Promoting variety to retain interest
Seasonal varieties can add excitement to favorite products all year long
Trendy ingredients and flavors make their way to breakfast
Spicy flavors
Superfoods and functional ingredients
Boosting breakfast excitement through international flavors
A focus on protein to convey health
Keeping meat-free alternatives in mind
Brunch cues add options for breakfast
Bowled over by breakfast
Sweet and savory flavor profiles
Bringing boozy brunch to breakfast
Breakfast snacks
Other categories make a play for the breakfast occasion
McCormick introduces breakfast seasonings
THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
92% of consumers eat breakfast on weekdays; 95% do so on weekends
69% of respondents make breakfast from scratch
Health leads breakfast attributes of interest, followed by convenience
Cereal leads for weekday breakfast, eggs are most popular on weekends
Most respondents say a healthy breakfast is high in protein
BREAKFAST CONSUMPTION
92% of consumers eat breakfast on weekdays; 95% do so on weekends
Figure 15: Breakfast consumption, April 2018
Men are more likely than women to eat breakfast at a foodservice
Figure 16: Breakfast consumption, by gender, April 2018
Close to one in five younger consumers are eating breakfast in transit
Figure 17: Breakfast consumption, by age, April 2018
Middle-income earners are more likely to visit foodservice for breakfast
Figure 18: Breakfast consumption, by HH income, April 2018
BREAKFAST SOURCE
69% of respondents make breakfast from scratch
Figure 19: Source of breakfast, April 2018
Three quarters of Hispanics make breakfast from scratch
Figure 20: Source of breakfast, by Hispanic origin, April 2018
Parents look to convenience
Figure 21: Source of breakfast, by parental status, April 2018
Foodservice is important for those who eat while in transit
Figure 22: Source of breakfast, by consumption location, April 2018
Low interest in breakfast meal kits
Figure 23: Breakfast attitudes/behaviors – Meal kit, April 2018
Figure 24: Breakfast attitudes/behaviors – Meal kit, by age, April 2018
BREAKFAST ATTRIBUTES
Health leads breakfast attributes of interest, followed by convenience
Figure 25: Breakfast attributes, April 2018
Figure 26: TURF analysis – Breakfast attributes, April 2018
Figure 27: Table – TURF analysis – Breakfast attributes, April 2018
Women are especially likely to seek a healthy breakfast
Figure 28: Breakfast attributes, by gender, April 2018
Health is of greater interest to older consumers, energizing appeals to younger eaters
Figure 29: Breakfast attributes, by age, April 2018
Fresh is of particular importance to Hispanic consumers
Figure 30: Breakfast attributes, by Hispanic origin, April 2018
In-transit and destination eaters are most likely to seek convenience
Figure 31: Breakfast attributes, by consumption location, April 2018
A third of consumer say breakfast is their lightest meal of the day
Figure 32: Breakfast attitudes/behaviors – Lightest, April 2018
BREAKFAST FOODS CONSUMED
Cereal leads for weekday breakfast, eggs are most popular on weekends
Figure 33: Breakfast foods consumed, by segmentation, April 2018
Less than half of consumers eat the same thing for breakfast daily
Figure 34: Breakfast attitudes/behaviors – Habits, April 2018
Nearly a quarter of 18-24s snack for breakfast
Figure 35: Breakfast attitudes/behaviors – Habits, by age, April 2018
28% of parents say they eat the same breakfast as their kids
Figure 36: Breakfast attitudes/behaviors – Kids, April 2018
BREAKFAST FOOD PERCEPTIONS
Full breakfast (positive)
Cereal (positive)
Croissant (positive)
Smoothie bowl (positive-neutral)
Avocado toast (neutral)
Toaster pastry (negative)
BREAKFAST SCENARIOS
Normal weekday: Quick, easy, light, and convenient lead for weekday breakfast
Running late to work/class/meeting: Beverages/fruit help out when consumers are running late
Extra time: Hot breakfast is a more common occurrence when time allows
Important meeting: Consumers seek energizing options
HEALTHY BREAKFAST
The highest percentage of respondents say a healthy breakfast is high in protein
Figure 37: Healthy breakfast, April 2018
Women are more likely than men to equate high protein with health
Figure 38: Healthy breakfast, by gender, April 2018
Low sugar, grains, and low fat more likely to equal health among 45+
Figure 39: Healthy breakfast, by age, April 2018
Respondents tie healthfulness to energy
Less than half of breakfast eaters think eating at home is healthier than away from home
Figure 40: Breakfast attitudes/behaviors – Healthy, April 2018
FOOD AND DRINK SHOPPER SEGMENTATION
Figure 41: Cluster analysis of breakfast foods, April 2018
Karen: Convince me
Figure 42: Profile of Karen: Convince me, April 2018
Opportunities
Figure 43: Breakfast consumption (home), by segmentation April 2018
Alyssa: I’ll take it
Figure 44: Profile of Alyssa: I’ll take it, April 2018
Opportunities
Figure 45: Breakfast attributes, by segmentation, April 2018
Tammy: Traditional and tired
Figure 46: Profile of Tammy: Traditional and tired, April 2018
Opportunities
Figure 47: Source of breakfast, by segmentation, April 2018
David: Driven by value
Figure 48: Profile of David: Driven by value, April 2018
Opportunities
Figure 49: Breakfast attitudes/behaviors – Tone, by segmentation, April 2018
APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
Data sources
Consumer survey data
Consumer qualitative research
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations

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