BLACK HAIRCARE - US - AUGUST 2019

BLACK HAIRCARE - US - AUGUST 2019

  • Mintel
  • August 2019
  • Personal Care
  • 0 pages

Report Description

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The Black haircare market has evolved into regimen maintenance and styling, with chemical product use concentrated among the few who will always be customers. Having chemical-free hair is no longer the big story, but rather how Black consumers’ beliefs and perceptions of their hair impacts their personal maintenance, style choices and product selection.

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Table of contents
OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Overview
The Black haircare market poised to grow to $2 billion on regimen alone
Regimen product overview
Figure 1: Estimated total expenditures and forecast, by Black consumers, by regimen segment, at current prices, 2014-24
Key takeaways
1. Market growth driven by regimen-focused products
2. Protective styles will be the next big thing
3. Moderate at-home haircare skills yield expected (but not fully satisfying) results
The issues and opportunities
Product collection use focused on conditioners and styling products
Figure 2: Multi-outlet sales of Black haircare regimen products, by leading haircare companies, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Natural hair is the norm, but protective styles evolve as a preferred style
Figure 3: Hairstyles worn within the last year – females, by relaxed and protective styles, 2016-19
Alternative, natural products are complicated to use
Figure 4: Alternative haircare product use, June 2019
Products work as expected because they are formulated just for them
Figure 5: Haircare brand preferences, June 2019
There is a gap between skill and confidence in their looks
Figure 6: Haircare skills and perceptions of Hairstyles, June 2019
What it means
THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Black consumers account for one out of five total haircare dollars spent
Modest spending growth expected within regimen sales
Haircare brand looks to impact policy
Mainstream companies and retailers look to Black consumers to drive growth
MARKET SIZE AND FORECAST
Regimen focused collections drive the Black haircare market
Figure 7: Expenditures and fan chart forecast expenditures by Black consumers for shampoo, conditioner, and styling products, at current prices, 2014-24
Figure 8: Historical and forecast expenditures by Black consumers for shampoo, conditioner, and styling products, at current prices, 2014-24
Black consumer regimen sales equal one fifth of the general market
Figure 9: regimen haircare expenditure estimate share by category, total and Black, 2018
MARKET BREAKDOWN
Haircare regimen sales grow at a steady pace
Figure 10: Expenditures by Black consumers on haircare regimen products, by segment, at current prices, 2017-19
Shampoo forecast reflects steady use of product collections
Figure 11: Estimated and fan chart forecast expenditures by Black consumers for shampoo, at current prices, 2014-24
Conditioner sales reflect treatment and styling use
Figure 12: Estimated and fan chart forecast expenditures by Black consumers for conditioners, at current prices, 2014-24
Figure 13: Cantu shea butter hair mask, 2019
Styling forecast mixed – signals cannibalization from conditioners
Figure 14: Estimated and fan chart forecast expenditures by Black consumers for styling products, at current prices, 2014-24
Hair color will have a market so long as consumers cover gray
Figure 15: Estimated and fan chart forecast expenditures by Black consumers for hair color, at current prices, 2014-24
Relaxers sales continue to plummet to niche status
Figure 16: Estimated and fan chart forecast expenditures by Black consumers for relaxers, at current prices, 2014-24
MARKET PERSPECTIVE
Dove, politicians join forces to ban discrimination of natural hair
Figure 17: Dove Crown Act twitter advertising with influencer Ty Alexander, July 2019
MARKET FACTORS
Mainstream companies double down on Black haircare market with acquisitions and new products
Figure 18: Suave Naturals Twitter Advertising, May-June 2019
Figure 19: Head and Shoulders Royal Oils video, January-February 2019
Figure 20: Sally’s Beauty Supply/P&G My Black is Beautiful Facebook and online advertising, June 2019
KEY PLAYERS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Consumer spending on anchor products grow
Shea Moisture retains 19% of consumer spending in the category
Cantu eclipses L’Oréal’s second place spot
All texture brands create a space and market for Black consumers
Alternative ingredients on brands’ and retailers’ radar
Increased prevalence of protective styles prompts product innovation
BLACK HAIRCARE COMPANY MANUFACTURER SALES
Anchor conditioner and styling products continue to grow
Figure 21: Multi-outlet sales of Black haircare regimen products, by leading black haircare companies, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
At-home chemical haircare products fall as expected
Figure 22: Multi-outlet sales of Black haircare relaxers and hair color, by leading black haircare companies, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Shea Moisture is the clear sales leader, Cantu moves up to second place
Figure 23: Multi-outlet sales of Black haircare products, by leading Black haircare companies, Rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Figure 24: SheaMoisture/Target Bamboo Charcoal collection, online banner ad, February 2019
Figure 25: SheaMoisture Raw Shea Butter Facebook ad, March 2019
Cantu product efficacy pays off in shampoo category
Figure 26: Multi-outlet sales of shampoo, by leading Black haircare companies and brands, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Spending on natural and traditional brands yield mixed results
Figure 27: Multi-outlet sales of conditioner, by leading Black haircare companies and brands, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Figure 28: Jamaican Mango & Lime advertising, January – February 2019
Cantu maintains styling category lead while new brand moves up to the big leagues
Figure 29: Multi-outlet sales of styling products, by leading Black haircare companies and brands, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
All relaxer brands experience sales declines
Figure 30: Multi-outlet sales of relaxer products, by leading Black haircare companies and brands, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Covering gray hair remains popular – for now
Figure 31: Multi-outlet sales of hair color products, by leading Black haircare companies and brands, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
WHAT’S WORKING?
Brands move toward inclusive product offerings for all textures
Figure 32: Multi-outlet sales of select all texture haircare products, by companies and brands, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Figure 33: Maui Moisture video ad, May 2019
Black haircare influencers impact consumer behavior
Figure 34: Cantu instructional video, “My Long Lasting Twist-Out”, 2019
Figure 35: Cantu instructional video, “My Bomb Blowout”, 2019
WHAT’S STRUGGLING?
Traditional brands can’t shake off their relaxer heritage
WHAT’S NEXT?
Retailers and brands offer natural product alternatives
Figure 36: Cantu Apple Cider Vinegar and Tea Tree Shampoo, February 2019
Figure 37: Revlon/Colomer – Creme of Nature Clay and Charcoal Facebook Advertising, July 2019
Figure 38: Aztec Secret Indian Healing Clay in Target beauty section, March 2019
New product launches address natural haircare underneath protective styles
Figure 39: Hairstyles worn within the last year – females, by relaxed and protective styles, 2016-19
Figure 40: Girl+ Hair Introductory video to Under Hair Care, 2019
Figure 41: PDC Brands’ Cantu Apple Cider Vinegar Root Rinse, December 2018
THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Hairstyle preferences cause shift in consumer segments
Natural, textured style wearers have greater flexibility in their choices
Alternative ingredient product use in nascent stage
Black-targeted haircare products are preferred to ensure efficacy
Most Black consumers can maintain their hair, but believe that they look presentable, not great
BLACK HAIRCARE SEGMENTS
Growing importance of protective styles impact female segments
Figure 42: Black female haircare segmentation, June 2019
Natural Nina represents a small segment of natural women
Figure 43: Demographic profile of Natural Nina haircare segment, June 2019
Trendy Tonya’s preference for protective styles is becoming the norm
Figure 44: Demographic profile of Trendy Tonya haircare segment, June 2019
As Relaxed Regina ages, she prefers what’s familiar
Figure 45: Demographic profile of Relaxed Regina haircare segment, June 2019
Image is everything for Adventurous Ashley
Figure 46: Demographic profile of Adventurous Ashley haircare segment, June 2019
Men prefer simple, yet groomed styles
Figure 47: Black male haircare segmentation, June 2019
Handsome Henry stays groomed from head to toe
Figure 48: Demographic profile of Handsome Henry haircare segment, June 2019
Stylish Steve wears varied styles just like his peers
Figure 49: Demographic profile of Stylish Steve haircare segment, June 2019
Classic Carl’s grooming extends only to natural products
Figure 50: Demographic profile of Classic Carl haircare segment, June 2019
HAIR TEXTURE
Hair type helps Black women navigate the category
Figure 51: Hair texture – females, June 2019
Men are not as hair engaged as women
Figure 52: Hair texture – males, June 2019
HAIRSTYLES WORN
Natural is the standard, but styles within can vary
Figure 53: Hairstyles worn within the last three years, June 2019
Women stick to the same look, but will experiment with protective styles
Figure 54: Hairstyles worn within the last three years – females, by last time worn, June 2019
Young women more likely to alternate between natural and protective styles
Figure 55: Hairstyles worn in the past three years, by female haircare segments, June 2019
A simple low-cut fade is the style of choice for most men
Figure 56: Hairstyles worn in the past three years, by male haircare segments, June 2019
ALTERNATIVE HAIRCARE PRODUCT USAGE
Consumers looking for magic in the bottle turn to alternative products
Figure 57: Alternative haircare product use, June 2019
Protective styles require the most maintenance
Figure 58: Alternative haircare product use – females, by select hairstyles worn, June 2019
Multi-functional natural products limited by difficulty in use
Figure 59: Alternative haircare product use – females, by count of product types, June 2019
Men keep it simple and stick to formulated products
Figure 60: Alternative haircare product use – males, June 2019
HAIRCARE BRAND PREFERENCES
Black consumers trust and use products made specifically for them
Figure 61: Haircare brand preferences, June 2019
Figure 62: Black haircare price points, 2014-19
Product function is universal, but quality and performance tied to outcomes
Figure 63: Haircare brand preferences, by female haircare segments, June 2019
Engaged men trust that products will work with little regard to brands
Figure 64: Haircare brand preferences, by male haircare segments, June 2019
HAIRCARE SKILLS AND EXPERIMENTATION
Most women can create a presentable hairstyle on their own
Figure 65: Haircare skills and experimentation frequency – females, June 2019
Women stick to a familiar process, even if highly skilled
Figure 66: Experimentation frequency – females, by haircare skills, 2019
Most men wear a low-maintenance style that requires basic skills
Figure 67: Haircare skills and experimentation frequency – males, June 2019
PERCEPTIONS OF HAIRSTYLES
Some look their best most of the time…others look presentable
Figure 68: Perceptions of hairstyles, June 2019
As women abandon relaxers, some remain self-conscious
Figure 69: Perceptions of hairstyles – females, by select hairstyles worn, June 2019
Men with styled natural hair like the look, but express some self-doubt
Figure 70: Perceptions on hairstyles – males, by select hairstyles worn, June 2019
Confidence tied to skill level and self-perception
Figure 71: Perceptions of hairstyles, by female haircare segments, June 2019
In their own words
Figure 72: Personal hair styling “must have” products and tools, May 2019
APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
Data sources
Sales data
Fan chart forecast
Consumer survey data
Consumer qualitative research
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations
Terms
APPENDIX – THE MARKET
Figure 73: Expenditures by Black consumers for shampoo, conditioner, and styling products, at current prices, 2014-24
Figure 74: Expenditures by Black consumers for shampoo, conditioner, and styling products, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2014-24
Figure 75: Expenditures by Black consumers for shampoo, conditioner, and styling products, by segment, at current prices, 2014-24
Figure 76: Expenditures by Black consumers for haircare products, by segment, at current prices, 2017 and 2019
Figure 77: Expenditures by Black consumers on shampoo, at current prices, 2014-24
Figure 78: Expenditures by Black consumers on shampoo, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2014-24
Figure 79: Expenditures by Black consumers on conditioner, at current prices, 2014-24
Figure 80: Expenditures by Black consumers on conditioner, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2014-24
Figure 81: Expenditures by Black consumers on styling products, at current prices, 2014-24
Figure 82: Expenditures by Black consumers on styling products, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2014-24
Figure 83: Expenditures of Black consumers on hair color, at current prices, 2014-24
Figure 84: Expenditures of Black consumers on hair color, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2014-24
Figure 85: Expenditures by Black consumers on relaxers, at current prices, 2014-24
Figure 86: Expenditures by Black consumers on relaxers, at inflation-adjusted prices, 2014-24
APPENDIX – KEY PLAYERS
Figure 87: Multi-outlet sales of Black haircare products, by leading haircare companies, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Figure 88: Multi-outlet sales of shampoo, by leading haircare companies, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Figure 89: Multi-outlet sales of conditioner by leading haircare companies, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Figure 90: Multi-outlet sales of styling products by leading haircare companies, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Figure 91: Multi-outlet sales of relaxers products by leading haircare companies, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Figure 92: Multi-outlet sales of hair color products by leading haircare companies, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019
Figure 93: Multi-outlet sales of select all texture haircare products, by companies and brands, rolling 52 weeks 2018 and 2019

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