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Attitudes Toward Corporate Social Responsibility - US - September 2012

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Sep 2012

Category :

Legal Services

No. of Pages : 150 Pages


Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has evolved from its origin of a suggestion that corporations earmark a portion of their profits to put toward philanthropic initiatives, to becoming a basic component of the way that many companies operate their business. Along with increasing financial status, many companies now address social and environmental issues in mission statements, and include CSR commitments and milestones achieved in annual stakeholder reports. 

As CSR has increasingly become a routine part of operating a business, consumers have grown accustomed to seeing companies promote social and environmental benefits, and companies’ success is no longer measured purely based on profits.
Table of Content

SCOPE AND THEMES
What you need to know
Definition
Data sources
Consumer survey data
Advertising creative
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations
Terms

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
CSR overview
Drivers of CSR
Leading companies
Figure 1: Survey respondents’ top 15 named socially responsible/irresponsible companies or brands (unaided), June 2012
The consumer
Relatively few say that ethical behavior impacts purchasing decisions
Figure 2: How corporate social responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Women, older consumers, and less affluent are most likely to be influenced by CSR
Figure 3: How corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, by gender, age, and household income, June 2012
Good behavior positively impacts purchasing, but bad behavior is a stronger negative
Figure 4: How good corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by how corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Figure 5: How bad corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by how corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Claims of conservation and local support are most influential CSR attributes
Figure 6: Socially responsible attributes that influenced a purchase of those whose purchasing decisions are impacted by corporate ethical behavior, June 2012
Local, labor, clarity of commitment are most compelling CSR initiatives
Figure 7: Types of company social responsibility initiatives interested in learning about, June 2012
Millennials take a broader view of CSR
Figure 8: Types of company social responsibility initiatives aware/impacted consumers are interested in learning about, by generation, June 2012
Supporting local businesses, reducing waste, and accountability are most important
Figure 9: Most and least important issues related to corporate social responsibility, June 2012
Older generations think business and CSR can be successfully combined
Figure 10: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility—business priorities, by generation, June 2012
Millennials least likely to share in the responsibility; but want to learn more
Figure 11: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility—shared responsibility, by generation, June 2012
More than half of Millennials support government enforcement of CSR
Figure 12: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility—enforcement/accountability, by generation, June 2012
Ethical behavior expected regardless of race; CSR impact on purchasing is similar
Figure 13: Attitudes toward company ethical behavior, October 2010-November 2011*, and how corporate social responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2012**
What we think

ISSUES IMPACTING CSR
Can a corporation be a “good company” without the cosmetics of CSR?
Do CSR rankings and ratings do more harm than good?
Will corporations adopt CSR if it means profitability will suffer?
Will CSR become a mandatory and regulated “cost of doing business” in the U.S.?

INSIGHTS AND OPPORTUNITIES
India on track to be the first country to make CSR mandatory
CSR marketing should align with a company’s core business
“Connected Capitalism” may be the next evolution of CSR
Let’s hear it for the girls

TREND APPLICATION
Inspire Trend: Patriot Games
Inspire Trend: Without a Care
Inspire 2015 Trends
Brand Intervention

DRIVERS OF CSR
Overview
Global social and financial concerns drive CSR activism
Government adoption of new CSR principles and policies drive CSR
Consumer expectations of ethical behavior drive CSR
Figure 14: Attitudes toward company ethical behavior, by gender, age, household income, October 2010- November 201
New generation of workers desire companies that benefit society
Figure 15: Importance of having a job or career that benefits society, 18-34s vs. 35+, December 2011
Follow the leaders: most large companies issue sustainability reports

LEADING COMPANIES
Key points
CSR ratings and rankings abound
Familiarity, revenue performance, scandal place big names on both lists
Figure 16: Survey respondents’ top 15 named socially responsible/irresponsible companies or brands (unaided), June 2012
Most profitable companies are named as most socially irresponsible
Figure 17: Revenue of top companies named by survey respondents for being socially responsible/irresponsible, August 2012

INNOVATIONS AND INNOVATORS
Social, philanthropic, and sustainable innovations in CSR
Starbucks, U.S.: “Create Jobs for USA” supports domestic manufacturing
BodyTech gym, Brazil: incorporating one-for-one donations to lose and gain weight
Figure 18: BodyTech Weight Donation video, 2012
Kraft Foods Foundation, U.S.: Feeding America brings mobile pantry to food deserts
Starbucks, Hong Kong: transforming food waste to raw ingredients for new products
Molson Coors Canada: Investing in responsible drinking education
Social media use in CSR
Tata Docomo, India: The BloodLine Club
Figure 19: The BloodLine Club, 2012
Join My Village, Africa and India: One-for-one donations to multiple causes
Figure 20: Join My Village, 2012

CSR MARKETING OF LEADING COMPANIES
Overview
Apple Computer, Inc.
Sony: make. believe
Figure 21: Sony “For the next generation” Japanese print advertisement, August 2012
Walmart: Save money. Live better.
Websites
Figure 22: Walmart website homepage, August 2012
Figure 23: Walmart Community, Walmart solar, August 2012
YouTube videos
Figure 24: Children’s Miracle Network Ohio: Walmart Associates Say Thank You, YouTube video, August 2012
Figure 25: Walmart 12 Days of Giving, YouTube video, December 2011
Figure 26: The meaning of shareholders, YouTube video, July 2011
Figure 27: Walmart Neighborhood Market, YouTube video, July 2011
Facebook
McDonald’s: I’m lovin’ it.
Websites
Figure 28: McDonald’s website homepage, August 2012
YouTube videos
Figure 29: McDonald’s USA Listening Tour Sustainability, Nutrition and Our Food, May 2012
Figure 30: McDonald’s Road to Sustainability, January 2010
BP Oil: Beyond Petroleum
Websites
Figure 31: BP’s website homepage, August 2012
YouTube videos
Figure 32: BP fuels America. America fuels BP., January 2010
Figure 33: BP Gulf Coast Update: Our Ongoing Commitment, December 2011

CSR IMPACT ON PURCHASING BEHAVIOR
Key points
Relatively few say that ethical behavior impacts purchasing decisions
Figure 34: How corporate social responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Contradictory patterns emerge in CSR’s impact on purchasing
Figure 35: How corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, by gender, age, and household income, June 2012

IMPACT OF GOOD AND BAD CORPORATE BEHAVIOR
Key points
Good corporate behavior has a positive impact on purchasing
Figure 36: How good corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by how corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Even among CSR-aware, Millennials are the least likely to be impacted
Figure 37: How good corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions of those aware/impacted, by generation, June 2012
Bad behavior is a stronger negative than good behavior is a positive
Figure 38: How bad corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by how corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Nine in 10 who are impacted by corporate behavior avoid bad companies
Figure 39: How bad corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions of those aware/impacted, by generation, June 2012

SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE ATTRIBUTES’ IMPACT ON PURCHASES
Key points
Conservation and local support claims are most influential
Figure 40: Based a purchase on a socially responsible attribute, by how corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Environmental responsibility is an expectation for most
Figure 41: Attitudes toward the environment, by age, October 2010-November 2011
Despite tepid environmental attitudes, Millennials support responsibility
Figure 42: Based a purchase on a socially responsible attribute, by generation, June 2012

CSR INITIATIVES OF INTEREST
Key points
Local, labor, clarity of commitment are most compelling CSR initiatives
Figure 43: Types of company social responsibility initiatives interested in learning about, by how corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Millennials take a broader view of CSR
Figure 44: Types of company social responsibility initiatives aware/impacted consumers are interested in learning about, by generation, June 2012

MOST AND LEAST IMPORTANT CSR ISSUES
Key points
Local business support, waste reduction, accountability most important
Figure 45: Most and least important issues related to corporate social responsibility, June 2012
Corporate watchers tuned into the environment, others support business
Figure 46: Most important issues related to corporate social responsibility, by how corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Millennials’ opinions on CSR issues buck overall trends
Figure 47: Most important issues related to corporate social responsibility, by generation, June 2012

ATTITUDES TOWARD CSR
Key points
“American made” and economic recovery is top of mind; relates to CSR
Figure 48: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility, June 2012
Patriotic buying and supporting local business is socially responsible
Figure 49: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility—patriotism/local, by how corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Older consumers take a stronger stance on buying American
Figure 50: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility—patriotism/local, by generation, June 2012
Efficiency and profitability are priorities over CSR—both would be nice
Figure 51: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility—business priorities, by how corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Older generations think business success and CSR go hand in hand
Figure 52: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility—business priorities, by generation, June 2012
Majority feels that consumers should share responsibility with companies
Figure 53: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility—shared responsibility, by how corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Millennials least likely to share responsibility, but want to learn more
Figure 54: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility—shared responsibility, by generation, June 2012
Companies should “give back” as a requirement for doing business
Figure 55: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility—enforcement/accountability, by how corporate responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, June 2012
Millennials most supportive of government enforcement
Figure 56: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility—enforcement/accountability, by generation, June 2012

IMPACT OF RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN
Key points
Ethical behavior expected; CSR impacts purchasing behavior
Figure 57: Attitudes toward company ethical behavior, by race/Hispanic origin,
October 2010-November 2011
Figure 58: How corporate social responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2012
Impact of good and bad corporate behavior
Figure 59: How good and bad corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2012
Socially responsible attributes’ impact on purchases
Figure 60: Based a purchase on a socially responsible attribute, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2012
Figure 61: Attitudes toward the environment, by race/Hispanic origin, October 2010-November 2011
CSR initiatives of interest
Figure 62: Types of company social responsibility initiatives interested in learning about, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2012
Most important CSR issues
Figure 63: Most important issues related to corporate social responsibility, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2012
Attitudes toward CSR
Figure 64: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2012

APPENDIX: OTHER USEFUL CONSUMER TABLES
CSR impact on purchasing behavior
Figure 65: How corporate social responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, by employment, June 2012
Figure 66: How corporate social responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, by gender and presence of children in household, June 2012
Figure 67: How corporate social responsibility impacts purchasing behavior, by generation, June 2012
Impact of good and bad corporate behavior
Good behavior
Figure 68: How good corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by gender, June 2012
Figure 69: How good corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by household income, June 2012
Figure 70: How good corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2012
Figure 71: How good corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by gender and presence of children in household, June 2012
Figure 72: How good corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by generation, June 2012
Bad behavior
Figure 73: How bad corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, January 2010 and June 2012
Figure 74: How bad corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by gender, June 2012
Figure 75: How bad corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by household income, June 2012
Figure 76: How bad corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2012
Figure 77: How bad corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by gender and presence of children in household, June 2012
Figure 78: How bad corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions, by generation, June 2012
Figure 79: How bad corporate behavior affects purchasing decisions of those aware/impacted, by household income, June 2012
Socially responsible attributes’ impact on purchases
Figure 80: Based a purchase on a socially responsible attribute, by gender, June 2012
Figure 81: Based a purchase on a socially responsible attribute, by household income, June 2012
CSR initiatives of interest
Figure 82: Types of company social responsibility initiatives interested in learning about, by gender, June 2012
Figure 83: Types of company social responsibility initiatives interested in learning about, by household income, June 2012
Figure 84: Types of company social responsibility initiatives interested in learning about, by gender and presence of children in household, June 2012
Figure 85: Types of company social responsibility initiatives interested in learning about, by generation, June 2012
Most important CSR issues
Figure 86: Most important issues related to corporate social responsibility, by household income, June 2012
Figure 87: Most important issues related to corporate social responsibility, by gender and presence of children in household, June 2012
Attitudes toward CSR
Figure 88: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility, by gender, June 2012
Figure 89: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility, by age, June 2012
Figure 90: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility, by household income, June 2012
Figure 91: Attitudes toward corporate social responsibility, by gender and presence of children in household, June 2012
Leading companies
Figure 92: Can think of and name socially responsible and irresponsible companies/brands, June 2012
Open ends
Socially responsible categories, companies, and brands
Figure 93: Categories of socially responsible companies or brands (unaided), June 2012
Figure 94: Socially responsible retailers, CPG, and tech companies/brands (unaided), as indicated by survey respondents, June 2012
Figure 95: Socially responsible household, media, and apparel companies/brands (unaided), as indicated by survey respondents, June 2012
Figure 96: Socially responsible foodservice, auto, and energy companies/brands (unaided), as indicated by survey respondents, June 2012
Figure 97: Socially responsible appliance, toy, and telecom companies/brands (unaided), as indicated by survey respondents, June 2012
Figure 98: Socially responsible travel and insurance companies/brands (unaided), as indicated by survey respondents, June 2012
Socially irresponsible categories, companies, and brands
Figure 99: Categories of socially irresponsible companies or brands (unaided), as indicated by survey respondents, June 2012
Figure 100: Socially irresponsible retail stores, financial, and energy companies/brands (unaided), as indicated by survey respondents, June 2012
Figure 101: Socially irresponsible media, foodservice, and tech companies/brands (unaided), as indicated by survey respondents, June 2012
Figure 102: Socially irresponsible CPG, household, and apparel companies/brands (unaided), as indicated by survey respondents, June 2012
Figure 103: Socially irresponsible auto, telecom, and chemical companies/brands (unaided), as indicated by survey respondents, June 2012
Figure 104: Socially irresponsible insurance, government, personal care companies/brands (unaided), as indicated by survey respondents, June 2012
Figure 105: Socially irresponsible insurance, government, personal care companies/brands (unaided), June 2012

APPENDIX: TRADE ASSOCIATIONS

APPENDIX: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

CONSUMER RESEARCH
Primary Data Analysis
Sampling
Global Market Insite (GMI)
Secondary Data Analysis
Experian Simmons National Consumer Studies
Statistical Forecasting
Statistical modelling
Qualitative insight
The Mintel fan chart
Weather analogy

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