866-997-4948(US-Canada Toll Free)

Attitudes toward Charities and Non-profits - US - October 2016

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Oct 2016

Category :

Lifestyle

No. of Pages : N/A

Giving to charities and non-profit organizations reached a historic high in 2015. Individuals account for the largest portion of donors, followed by foundation. Financial support is estimated to grow slightly from 2015-16, though declines in volunteerism may prompt organizations to promote the importance of giving back to organizations in a more physical way.

Table of Contents

OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Young adults are skeptical of company partnerships with charities and non-profits
Figure 1: Perceptions of companies that support charities/non-profits – Self-serving, by the iGeneration vs Millennials, June 2016
Adults want to donate, but likely won’t if they’re unfamiliar with the organization
Figure 2: Attitudes toward charities and non-profits, June 2016
Circulating information via media isn’t as successful as through word of mouth
Figure 3: Sources used to learn about a charity/non-profit, June 2016
The opportunities
Charity support increases with presence of children in the home
Figure 4: Types of support – Active support, by parental status, June 2016
iGens show interest in supporting almost all causes
Figure 5: Causes interested in supporting, iGeneration vs all, June 2016
Non-profit support provides young adults with competitive edge in professional world
Figure 6: Reasons for supporting charities – Select items, by generation, June 2016
What it means

THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Charitable giving is strong and expected to continue growing
Religious organizations generate most donations
Volunteerism rates decline to historic lows
Charitable giving tends to reflect GDP patterns

MARKET SIZE
Charitable giving sets new record high in 2015, continued growth in 2016
Figure 7: Total giving, 1954-2016 (est)
Figure 8: Total giving, 2011-16 (est)

MARKET BREAKDOWN
Individuals contribute the most
Figure 9: Total giving, by source, 2015 and 2016 (est)
Figure 10: Total giving, at current prices, by source, 2014 and 2016 (est)
Religious organizations receive largest amount of donations
Figure 11: Charitable giving, by charity type, 2015

MARKET FACTORS
Charitable giving reflects GDP pattern
Figure 12: GDP change from previous period, Q1 2007-Q2 2016
Rising DPI leaves more money for giving
Figure 13: Disposable personal income change from previous period, January 2007-June 2016
Volunteering rates dip to historic low in 2015
Figure 14: Volunteering rate in the US, by gender, 2002-15

KEY PLAYERS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Diverse digital options for giving likely leading to increases in donations
Credit cards provide easy avenue to support organizations
But corporate partnerships likely not as charitable as consumers may think
Charity scams following tragedies may lead to more skeptical donors
Organizations benefit from “gamifying” their support options
Donors who see their donations put to good use may repeat

WHAT’S WORKING?
Funding through digital media
Facebook
“Fundraiser” pages
Figure 15: Visualizing crisis relief in Nepal, September 2015
Facebook Messenger
Figure 16: Lokai: Walk with Yeshi, August 2016
YouTube
Donation cards
Donating by watching videos
Figure 17: This tortoise could save a life – Ft. Alan Rickman, December 2015
Paying it forward with every swipe
Giving Tuesday opens Americans’ wallets and hearts

WHAT’S STRUGGLING?
Charity-based credit cards give back minimally
eCommerce contributions may not be as charitable as they seem
AmazonSmile
Charity scams following tragedies
Slacktivism still popular on social media
Volunteering sees lowest rate in 14 years

WHAT’S NEXT?
Gamifying giving: Organizations jump on Pokémon Go bandwagon
Social media provides a modern outlet for crowdfunding non-profits
Seeing viral movements making a change
Chan Zuckerberg Initiative setting the standard for corporate giving

THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Donating items or money represent largest type of charitable support
Young adults are most likely to support causes and more of them
Lifestage affects motivations for supporting charities and non-profits
Word of mouth is most frequent way adults learn about charities
Companies’ support is seen as more sincere than self-serving
Organization awareness is crucial when deciding who to support

TYPES OF SUPPORT
Money and item donations are most popular among supporters
Donations
Active support
Figure 18: Types of support, June 2016
Digital and social media support is most popular among younger adults
Figure 19: Types of support – Digital and social media, by the iGeneration vs Millennials, June 2016
Supporting beyond money is strongest among iGens and Millennials
Figure 20: Types of support – Active support, by the iGeneration vs Millennials, June 2016
Household income determines likelihood and amount of support
Figure 21: Types of support – Active support, by household income, June 2016
Having children in the household increases charitable support
Figure 22: Types of support – Active support, by parental status, June 2016

CAUSES SUPPORTED IN LAST 12 MONTHS
Healthcare research most-supported type of charity or non-profit
Human service represent strong support among adults
Religion is polarizing but boasts largest financial donations
Figure 23: Causes supported in last 12 months, June 2016
Millennials more likely to have supported all types of charities and more of them
Figure 24: Causes supported in last 12 months, Millennials vs all, June 2016
Figure 25: Causes supported in last 12 months, Millennials vs all, June 2016
iGeneration more interested in supporting almost all types
Figure 26: Causes interested in supporting, iGeneration vs all, June 2016
Higher household income leads to a wider range of cause support
Figure 27: Causes interested in supporting, by household income, June 2016

REASONS FOR SUPPORTING CHARITIES
Helping others in need is primary reason for supporting charities
Causes are more likely to be supported if its mission affects people they know
Figure 28: Reasons for supporting charities, June 2016
Younger adults value the competitive edge charity support provides
Figure 29: Reasons for supporting charities – Select items, by generation, June 2016
For parents, supporting charities is a family affair
Figure 30: Reasons for supporting charities – Select items, by parental status, June 2016
Non-Hispanic Whites most motivated to help others in need
Figure 31: Reasons for supporting charities – Select items, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2016

SOURCES USED TO LEARN ABOUT CHARITIES AND NON-PROFITS
Word of mouth from family and friends is primary way to learn
Television and social media are important in teaching about organizations
Figure 32: Sources used to learn about a charity/non-profit, June 2016
Younger adults gaining awareness from digital media
Figure 33: Sources used to learn about a charity/non-profit – Digital media, by generation, June 2016
Those with higher household incomes learn from traditional media
Figure 34: Sources used to learn about a charity/non-profit, by household income, June 2016
Parents are more perceptive of digital media
Figure 35: Sources used to learn about a charity/non-profit – Digital media, by parental status, June 2016
Urban dwellers more aware of both traditional and digital media sources
Figure 36: Sources used to learn about a charity/non-profit – Traditional and digital media, by area, June 2016

PERCEPTIONS OF COMPANIES THAT SUPPORT CHARITIES/NON-PROFITS
Adults view company support of charities/non-profits as more sincere than self-interested
Figure 37: Perceptions of companies that support charities/non-profits, June 2016
Men are more critical of companies’ charitable partnerships
Figure 38: Perceptions of companies that support charities/non-profits, by gender, June 2016
Younger adults aren’t sold on company’s support of charities/non-profits
Figure 39: Perceptions of companies that support charities/non-profits – Self-serving, by the iGeneration vs Millennials, June 2016

ATTITUDES TOWARD CHARITIES AND NON-PROFITS
Adults want to donate, but likely won’t if they’re unfamiliar
Figure 40: Attitudes toward charities and non-profits, June 2016
Millennials want to donate, many don’t have the financial ability to do so
Figure 41: Attitudes toward charities and non-profits, by Millennials vs all, June 2016
Adults with higher household incomes are more selective with donations
Figure 42: Attitudes about charities/non-profits, by household income, June 2016
Urban dwellers are more encouraged and satisfied with their support
Figure 43: Attitudes toward charities and non-profits, by area, June 2016

CONSUMER SEGMENTATION
Figure 44: Charity and non-profit supporter segments, June 2016
Enthusiastic Supporters
Demographics
Characteristics
Opportunities
Figure 45: Profile of Enthusiastic Supporters, June 2016
Open-minded Supporters
Demographics
Characteristics
Opportunities
Figure 46: Profile of Open-minded Supporters, June 2016
Selective Supporters
Demographics
Characteristics
Opportunities
Figure 47: Profile of Selective Supporters, June 2016
Skeptical Supporters
Demographics
Characteristics
Opportunities
Figure 48: Profile of Skeptical Supporters, June 2016

APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
Data sources
Supporting data
Consumer survey data
Consumer qualitative research
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations
Terms

APPENDIX – MARKET
Figure 49: Total giving by source, 1955-2015

List of Table

NA

Make an enquiry before buying this Report

Please fill the enquiry form below.

  • Full Name *
  • Your Email *
  • Job Title *
  • Company *
  • Phone No. * (Pls. Affix Country Code)
  • Message
  • Security Code *