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Published on : Oct 09, 2017

In a new study done by a team of international researchers, considered as a breakthrough in oncology drugs and therapies, is based on improving the outcomes of the currently available treatments. The team led by the researchers at National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), USA, have discovered a new way to fix a crucial type of damage done to genome (DNA) observed in patients undergoing some types of oncology treatment to eliminate cancer cells.  The damage called DNA-protein cross-link (DPC) can be repaired by a protein that the scientists discovered and called ZATT and with the aid of another protein TDP2.

Breaking down TOP2-DPCs Complex Crucial for Stopping Recurrence of Cancer

The interplay of TDP and DPC is vital for the rejoining of the DNA ends that normally occur in individuals after cancer cells have been eradicated by drugs or therapies. However, the exact mechanism of the repair was not understood until they discovered ZATT and explored its function in breaking down DPCs and further removing any lesion arising out of topoisomerase 2 (TOP2)-DPC interaction. TOP2 remains stuck in the severed DNA creating a deadly complex. The TOP2-DPCs complex triggered by environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic drugs inhibits the healing mechanism envisaged by retying of DNA for the formation of healthy cells in individuals. Hence the breaking down of the complex in crucial to avoid the recurrence of cancer in individuals.

The scientists found that ZATT helps clinicians detect DPC and employ TDP2 to accomplish this task. Furthermore, the TOP2 interaction with environmental toxicants and chemical metabolites aggravates the situation.

The findings of the study, affirms scientists, will be a useful guide for developing more efficacious therapies and drugs in the coming years, by potentially targeting these defenses.