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Published on : Nov 12, 2018

Wearable biosensors hold immense potential in a variety of applications and are being researched thoroughly across the globe. With new developments in the area and in associate technologies that enable various functionalities, biosensors are becoming more and more advanced and efficient. However, one factor continues to hold back their widespread use – the lack of a long-lasting, lightweight power supply.

A new study, however, could change the scenario and make biosensors more effective for long-term use as well. Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst have devised a way of developing a charge-storage system that can be very easily integrated into any clothing item.

In the method, a micro supercapacitor, conductive threads combined with a polymer film, and a specialized sewing method are used to develop a flexible embroidery of electrodes on a fabric. The resulting device holds a high ability of storing charge considering its size and has other features that allow it to act as a power source for wearable biosensors. This is a promising development for the field of wearable biosensors as conventional batteries are too heavy, too large, and are not flexible.

With this technique, it can be possible to literally designs a charge-storage pattern and embroider it on any garment with the help of vapor-coated threads. This means that self-powered garments may soon become a promising reality with the help of such sewed circuits. The researchers have used supercapacitors owing to the fact that supercapacitors are ideal for charge storage circuits in wearable products owing to their higher power densities as compared to conventional batteries.