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Published on : Jan 25, 2018

Facebook has recently publicized about its acquisition of a firm that works with biometrics and the verification of IDs for various business, named Confirm.io. However, a more interesting update about the social media company has been its release of a two-question survey on Tuesday to verify if any news appearing in Facebook’s feed is from trustworthy sources. For the identification of trustworthy news sources, it was just last week that CEO Mark Zuckerberg had outlined certain changes. The company has been looking to get a general feel of how reliable a particular website could be by directly seeking the response of users instead of leaving the decisions up to itself or asking external experts.

Update to Not Change Amount of News Users See on Facebook

At first, Facebook would ask users if they actually know a website. Later, they would be asked to rank each of the domains on the basis of how trustable it is. The options could include ‘not at all’, ‘barely,’ ‘somewhat,’ ‘a lot,’ and ‘entirely.’ Users that respond with a no to the first question would be omitted from the data. The idea here is to determine who actually trusts a particular news source: users that follow the source’s page or if the trust is a general agreement across the population. The data acquired would decide the fate of news stories whether they make the news feed algorithms recently updated, said Zuckerberg.

The trustworthiness survey has been said to not reduce the volume of news to appear in the news feed anymore. However, it has been said to shift the news balance toward sources trusted by the community.