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Womenswear - UK - May 2015

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : May 2015

Category :

Apparel

No. of Pages : 66 Pages

While women continue to prioritise buying new clothes over other areas of spend, with the womenswear market rising, sales slowed compared with the previous year due to high levels of discounting.
Table of Content

Overview

What you need to know
Products covered in this report

Executive Summary

Womenswear sales slow
Figure 1: Best- and worst-case forecast of UK sales of women’s outerwear, 2009-19
M&S maintains trustworthy image, built on customer service
Figure 2: Attitudes towards and usage of selected brands, November 2014 and January 2015
One in seven women wear plus sizes
Figure 3: Women’s UK clothing size/waist sizes, January 2015
Primark leads, but loses popularity among young
Figure 4: Retailers from which women bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months, split by in-store and online, January 2015
Women cut back
Figure 5: Changes in shopping behaviour for number of items of clothing bought and amount spent in the last 12 months, January 2015
Discounting hits womenswear hard
Figure 6: Female shopping behaviour when buying clothes in-store or online, January 2015
Smart fitting rooms could reduce returns
Figure 7: Women’s attitudes towards innovations when shopping for clothes in-store and online, January 2015

Issues and Insights

How has the womenswear market performed and what is the forecast for the sector?
The facts
The implications
How can retailers cater to older women?
The facts
The implications
How can retailers use technology to improve the shopping experience?
The facts
The implications

The Market – What You Need to Know

Womenswear grows by 4% in 2014
Menswear outpaces womenswear
Sector will reach £32 billion by 2019
Women remain cautious about their spending
Decline in young women to impact market
Ageing population presents an opportunity
High rates of obesity lead to rising demand for larger clothes

Market Size and Forecast

Figure 8: UK sales of women’s outerwear at current prices, 2009-19
Figure 9: Best- and worst-case forecast of UK sales of women’s outerwear, 2009-19

Market Drivers

Ageing female population
Figure 10: Trends in the age structure of the UK female population, 2009-19
Female employment set to rise
Figure 11: Female employment and unemployment, 2009-19
Obesity
Figure 12: Proportion of overweight and obese female population, 2008-13
Women are less confident about their finances than men
Figure 13: How respondents describe their financial situation, by gender, March 2015
Figure 14: Current financial situation compared with a year ago, by gender, March 2015
Women cutting back on clothes purchases
Figure 15: Activities women have done in the last three months, March 2014 and 2015
Technology
Figure 16: Personal ownership of consumer technology products, by gender, November 2014
Figure 17: Personal ownership of consumer technology products, by gender, November 2014

Key Players – What You Need to Know

Retailers focus on new store concepts
Personalised websites
Retailers cut back on adspend
M&S associated with good customer service
Next has strong all-round brand image
White Stuff benefits from positive customer reviews

Innovations

In-store technology
Virtual shopping experience
Figure 18: Karen Millen’s ‘Shop Knightsbridge’ online platform
New fashion brand targeting mums
Contemporary concept
Figure 19: A contemporary feel for Jigsaw’s new Milton Keynes store, designed by GP Studio
Online personalisation
Marketing to create a hype

Space Allocation Summary

Formal/casual split
Figure 20: Retailers of womenswear: formal/casual space allocation, October 2014
Space allocations: Detailed estimates
Figure 21: Broad range clothing retailers, detailed space allocations for womenswear, October 2014
Figure 22: Broad range clothing retailers and supermarket chains, detailed space allocations for womenswear, October 2014
Figure 23: Womenswear specialists, retailers’ space allocation estimates, October 2014
Estimated sales breakdown
Figure 24: Leading clothing retailers’ estimated sales, by product, 2014
Sales densities
Figure 25: Leading clothing retailers’ estimated sales densities, by product, 2014
Market shares
Figure 26: Leading clothing retailers’ estimated market shares for womenswear, 2014

Brand Research

What you need to know
Brand map
Figure 27: Attitudes towards and usage of selected brands, November 2014 and January 2015
Key brand metrics
Figure 28: Key metrics for selected brands, November 2014 and January 2015
Brand attitudes: Primark predominantly noted for value
Figure 29: Attitudes, by brand, November 2014 and January 2015
Brand personality: Ted Baker seen as most exclusive
Figure 30: Brand personality – Macro image, November 2014 and January 2015
Marks & Spencer noted for customer service traits
Figure 31: Brand personality – Micro image, November 2014 and January 2015
Brand analysis
Zara offers more accessible higher-end proposition
Figure 32: User profile of Zara, January 2015
Ted Baker is seen as most exclusive, limiting overall usage
Figure 33: User profile of Ted Baker, January 2015
Marks & Spencer maintains trustworthy image, built on customer service
Figure 34: User profile of Marks & Spencer, November 2014
Next has all-round brand image that appeals to wide range of women
Figure 35: User profile of Next, January 2015
Primark has value image, but 25-34s likely to note a stylish element as well
Figure 36: User profile of Primark, January 2015
New Look has limited target group, but has strong positive image among them
Figure 37: User profile of New Look, January 2015
White Stuff has potential for growth
Figure 38: User profile of White Stuff, January 2015
Fat Face has a similar image to White Stuff but lacks same satisfaction and recommendation
Figure 39: User profile of Fat Face, January 2015
Debenhams has trustworthy image but lacks the same customer service image as M&S
Figure 40: User profile of Debenhams, November 2014
Topshop/Topman’s overall image suffers from youthful targeting
Figure 41: User profile of Topshop/Topman, January 2015

Brand Communication and Promotion

Advertising spend declines in 2014
Figure 42: Main monitored advertising expenditure on womenswear, 2011-14
Press is the main form of advertising
Figure 43: Main monitored advertising expenditure on womenswear, by media type, 2014
M&S doubles adspend on womenswear
Figure 44: Main monitored advertising expenditure on womenswear, by advertiser, 2011-14

The Consumer – What You Need to Know

Driving purchases of fashion accessories alongside clothing
Plus-size sector remains underserviced
Older women more likely to wear larger sizes
Primark leads, but young shopping more online
Increase in over-55s buying clothes online
Women cut back on clothes purchases in last year
Increase in discounting impacts womenswear
33% of women return clothes bought online
Smart fitting rooms could reduce in-store returns
Latest technology can help draw young into stores

What Fashion Items Women Buy

Figure 45: Spending habits for clothing, footwear and accessories, by gender, March 2015

Female Clothes Sizes

One in seven women wear plus sizes
Figure 46: Women’s UK clothing size/waist sizes, January 2015
Older women wear bigger clothes sizes
Figure 47: Profile of women who wear clothes in plus sizes, by age, January 2015

Where Do Women Buy Clothes?

Primark leads, but loses popularity among young
Figure 48: Retailers from which women bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months, split by in-store and online, January 2015
Women aged 55+ shopping more online
Figure 49: Women who have purchased clothes online in the last 12 months, by age, December 2013 and January 2015
Young fashion retailers need to convince shoppers to visit stores
Figure 50: Women who have bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months from Primark, Next, Topshop, New Look, H&M and other mid-market high street retailers, in-store, by age, January 2015
Under-35s shop at five or more retailers
Figure 51: Repertoire of in-store retailers from which women have bought clothes in the last 12 months, January 2015

Changes in Purchasing Behaviour

Women cut back
Figure 52: Changes in shopping behaviour for number of items of clothing bought and amount spent in the last 12 months, January 2015
Young women spend more on clothes
Figure 53: Changes in shopping behaviour for amount spent in the last 12 months, by age, January 2015

Shopping Behaviour

Discounting hits womenswear hard
Figure 54: Female shopping behaviour when buying clothes in-store or online, January 2015
Catering to older women
Figure 55: Female shopping behaviour when buying clothes in-store or online, by age, January 2015
A third of women return clothes bought online
Figure 56: Profile of women who have returned clothes bought in-store and bought online, by age, January 2015

Consumer Attitudes towards Innovations

Smart fitting rooms could reduce returns
Figure 57: Women’s attitudes towards innovations when shopping for clothes in-store and online, January 2015
Young want to use mobile devices to shop in-store
Figure 58: Women’s attitudes towards innovations when shopping for clothes in-store and online, by age, January 2015

Data Sources and Abbreviations

Data sources
Fan chart forecast
Abbreviations

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