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Womenswear - UK - May 2014

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Jun 2014

Category :

Apparel

No. of Pages : 173 Pages

As women, particularly the main clothes shoppers aged under-35-years-old, increasingly favour browsing for clothes online rather than wandering the high street, websites that allow customers to play around with outfit building and use editorial content to promote the latest trends will encourage shoppers to buy the look and drive average basket size.
Table of Content

Introduction

Definitions
Abbreviations

Executive Summary

The market
Figure 1: Best and worst case forecast of UK sales of women’s outerwear, 2008-18
Market factors
Changes in population within 16-34 age group will impact womenswear
Some 25% of women are obese
Companies, brands and innovations
Who’s Innovating?
Market share
Brand research
Figure 2: Attitudes towards and usage of brands in the womenswear sector, November 2013
The consumer
Women prioritise buying new clothes
Figure 3: Activities women have done in the last three months, March 2013 and March 2014
Primark stands out as the leading womenswear player
Figure 4: Retailers from where women bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months, in-store and online, December 2013
Women show less interest in quality than men
Figure 5: Most important factors when buying clothes in-store when choosing one retailer over another, December 2013
Cost of delivery is more important than speed
Figure 6: Most important factors when buying clothes online when choosing one retailer over another, December 2013
Three quarters of women browse for clothes online
Figure 7: How women shop for clothes, December 2013
Women are big bargain hunters
Figure 8: Women’s attitudes towards shopping for clothes, December 2013
What we think

Issues and Insights

How has the womenswear market performed?
The facts
The implications
Who stands out as the winners in the womenswear market?
The facts
The implications
What are the main opportunities for growth?
The facts
The implications
What are the opportunities for the online womenswear sector?
The facts
The implications

Trend Applications

Trend: Prove It
Trend: Collective Intelligence
Mintel Futures: Brand Intervention

Market Environment

Key points
Changes in population within 16-34 age group will impact womenswear
Figure 9: Trends in the age structure of the UK female population, 2008-18
Targeting older women
Employment
Figure 10: Female employment and unemployment, 2008-18
Some 25% of women are obese
Figure 11: Proportion of overweight and obese female population, 2006-12
Women are less confident about their finances than men
Figure 12: How respondents describe their financial situation, by gender, March 2014
Figure 13: Current financial situation compared with a year ago, by gender, March 2014
Women nearly as likely as men to own tablet
Figure 14: Household ownership of computers, tablets and e-readers, by gender, December 2013
Men rather than women acquiring smartphones
Figure 15: Personal ownership of mobile phones, by gender, December 2013

Strengths and Weaknesses in the Market

Strengths
Weaknesses

Who’s Innovating?

Key points
New store launches
New collections
Designer collaborations
Personalisation
Technology
Online
In-store
In-store design

Market Size and Forecast

Key points
Women’s clothing sales rose 4.6% in 2013
Figure 16: Best and worst case forecast of UK sales of women’s outerwear, 2008-18
The future
Figure 17: UK sales of women’s outerwear, at current and constant prices, 2008-18
Factors used in the forecast

Space Allocation Summary

Key points
Space allocations: Detailed estimates
Figure 18: Space allocation estimates for womenswear, M&S, Next, Primark, TK Maxx, New Look, Matalan, September 2013
Figure 19: Space allocation estimates for womenswear, Zara, H&M, Debenhams, Asda, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, September 2013
Figure 20: Space allocation estimates for womenswear specialists, September 2013
Estimated sales breakdown
Figure 21: Estimated sales of womenswear by product, M&S, Next, Debenhams, Primark, TK Maxx, New Look, 2012/13
Figure 22: Estimated sales of womenswear by product, Matalan, Asda, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Zara, H&M, 2012/13
Sales density
Figure 23: Estimated sales density for womenswear by product, M&S, Next, Primark, Asda, TK Maxx, Debenhams, 2012/13
Market shares
Figure 24: Estimated market shares for womenswear, 2012/13

Brand Research

Brand map
Figure 25: Attitudes towards and usage of brands in the womenswear sector, November 2013
Correspondence analysis
Brand attitudes
Figure 26: Attitudes, by womenswear brand, November 2013
Brand personality
Figure 27: Womenswear brand personality – macro image, November 2013
Figure 28: Womenswear brand personality – micro image, November 2013
Brand experience
Figure 29: Womenswear brand usage, November 2013
Figure 30: Satisfaction with various womenswear brands, November 2013
Figure 31: Consideration of womenswear brands, November 2013
Figure 32: Consumer perceptions of current womenswear brand performance, November 2013
Brand recommendation
Figure 33: Recommendation of various womenswear brands, November 2013

Brand Advertising and Promotion

Key points
Topline spend continues to increase
Figure 34: Advertising expenditure for womenswear, 2010-13
Press remains the dominant medium
Figure 35: Main Monitored media advertising expenditure on women’s fashion by media type, 2010-13
Shop Direct main spender
Figure 36: Main monitored media advertising expenditure on women’s fashion by company, 2013

The Consumer – Women’s Spending Priorities

Key points
Women prioritise buying new clothes
Figure 37: Activities women have done in the last three months, March 2013 and March 2014
Same numbers of women and men buy shoes
Figure 38: Spending habits for clothing, footwear and accessories, by gender, March 2014

The Consumer – Where Do Women Buy Clothes?

Key points
Figure 39: Retailers from where women bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months, in-store and online, December 2013
Primark stands out as the leading womenswear player
M&S and Next
Figure 40: Women who have bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months from M&S and Next, in-store and online, by age group and socio-economic group, December 2013
Changes in where women shop over the last year
Figure 41: Retailers from where women bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months, in-store and online, January 2013 and December 2013
Women still buy more clothes online than men
Figure 42: Retailers from where women bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months, December 2013
Young fashion retailers draw older women
Figure 43: Women who have bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months from Topshop, H&M, New Look and other mid-market high street fashion retailers, in-store and online, by age group, December 2013
Young women like to shop at wide range of retailers
Supermarkets
Figure 44: Women who have bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months from Asda, Tesco and Sainsbury’s, in-store and online, by age group and socio-economic group, December 2013

The Consumer – Most Important Factors When Shopping In-Store

Key points
Women seek value for money
Figure 45: Most important factors when buying clothes in-store when choosing one retailer over another, December 2013
Focus on changing rooms
Older women want clothes available in their size
Figure 46: Most important factors when buying clothes in-store when choosing one retailer over another, by age group, December 2013
Targeting women aged 45+ with special offers
Store layout is important for 16-24s
Figure 47: Most important factors when buying clothes in-store when choosing one retailer over another, by age group, December 2013
Importance of factors by retailer last shopped at
Figure 48: Most important factors for people who last shopped at Primark when buying clothes in-store
Figure 49: Most important factors for people who last shopped at M&S when buying clothes in-store
Figure 50: Most important factors for people who last shopped at Next when buying clothes in-store

The Consumer – Most Important Factors When Shopping Online

Key points
Cost of delivery is more important than speed
Figure 51: Most important factors when buying clothes online when choosing one retailer over another, December 2013
Young want both fast and cost-effective delivery
Figure 52: Most important factors when buying clothes online when choosing one retailer over another, by age group, December 2013
25-34s most drawn to click-and-collect
Size guidance
Importance of factors by retailer last shopped at
Figure 53: Most important factors for people who last shopped at eBay when buying clothes online
Figure 54: Most important factors for people who last shopped at Next when buying clothes online
Figure 55: Most important factors for people who last shopped at M&S when buying clothes online
Figure 56: Most important factors for people who last shopped at online only retailers when buying clothes online relative to the average, December 2013

The Consumer – Shopping Journey

Key points
Three quarters of women browse for clothes online
Figure 57: How women shop for clothes, December 2013
Under-35s twice as likely to browse online as in-store
Figure 58: How women shop for clothes, by age group, December 2013
Young like to browse online both at home and out
Looking whilst at work
Fashion apps
How women shop by where they live
Figure 59: How women shop for clothes, by age group, December 2013

The Consumer – Women’s Attitudes to Shopping for Clothes

Key points
Figure 60: Women’s attitudes towards shopping for clothes, December 2013
Women are big bargain hunters
Women want one-stop shop for fashion
Under-25s willing to splash out on quality
Under-35s most fashion conscious
Under-35s look for unique offering
Young want more technology in-store

Appendix – Market Size and Forecast

Figure 61: Best and worst case forecast of UK sales of women’s outerwear, 2008-18
Appendix – Brand Research

Figure 62: Brand usage, November 2013
Figure 63: Brand usage, August 2013
Figure 64: Brand commitment, November 2013
Figure 65: Brand commitment, August 2013
Figure 66: Brand momentum, November 2013
Figure 67: Brand momentum, August 2013
Figure 68: Brand diversity, November 2013
Figure 69: Brand diversity, August 2013
Figure 70: Brand satisfaction, November 2013
Figure 71: Brand satisfaction, August 2013
Figure 72: Brand recommendation, November 2013
Figure 73: Brand recommendation, August 2013
Figure 74: Brand attitude, November 2013
Figure 75: Brand attitude, August 2013
Figure 76: Brand image – macro image, November 2013
Figure 77: Brand image – macro image, August 2013
Figure 78: Brand image – micro image, November 2013
Figure 79: Brand image – micro image, August 2013

Appendix – The Consumer – Where Do Women Buy Clothes?

Figure 80: Most popular retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – Bought in-store/online in the last 12 months, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 81: Next most popular retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – Bought in-store/online in the last 12 months, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 82: Other retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – Bought in-store/online in the last 12 months, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 83: Most popular retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – Bought in-store in the last 12 months, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 84: Next most popular retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – Bought in-store in the last 12 months, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 85: Other retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – Bought in-store in the last 12 months, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 86: Least popular retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – Bought in-store in the last 12 months, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 87: Most popular retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – Bought online in the last 12 months, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 88: Next most popular retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – Bought online in the last 12 months, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 89: Other retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – Bought online in the last 12 months, by demographics, December 2013

Appendix – The Consumer – Most Important Factors When Shopping In-Store

Figure 90: Most popular factors when buying clothing in-store from a particular retailer, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 91: Next most popular factors when buying clothing in-store from a particular retailer, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 92: Other factors when buying clothing in-store from a particular retailer, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 93: Most important factors when buying clothing in-store from a particular retailer, by last place where women bought clothes – In-store, December 2013

Appendix – The Consumer – Most Important Factors When Shopping Online

Figure 94: Most popular factors when buying clothing online from a particular retailer, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 95: Next most popular factors when buying clothing online from a particular retailer, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 96: Most important factors when buying clothing online from a particular retailer, by last place where women bought clothes – Online, December 2013

Appendix – The Consumer – Shopping Journey

Figure 97: Most popular how women shop for clothes, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 98: Next most popular how women shop for clothes, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 99: How women shop for clothes, by most popular retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – In-store/online, December 2013
Figure 100: How women shop for clothes, by next most popular retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – In-store/online, December 2013
Figure 101: How women shop for clothes, by other retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – In-store/online, December 2013

Appendix – The Consumer – Women’s Attitudes to Shopping for Clothes

Figure 102: Most popular women\'s attitudes towards shopping for clothes, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 103: Next most popular women\'s attitudes towards shopping for clothes, by demographics, December 2013
Figure 104: Women\'s attitudes towards shopping for clothes, by most popular retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – In-store/online, December 2013
Figure 105: Women\'s attitudes towards shopping for clothes, by next most popular retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – In-store/online, December 2013
Figure 106: Women\'s attitudes towards shopping for clothes, by other retailers from where women bought clothes for themselves in the last 12 months – In-store/online, December 2013

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