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Vegetables and Fruit - Canada - May 2017

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Jun 2017

Category :

Fruit & Vegetables

No. of Pages : N/A

Nearly all Canadians eat fruits and vegetables, though half of consumers claim they get the recommended servings of fruits and vegetables daily. Furthermore, a third of consumers state they are purchasing less produce as it’s become more expensive, even as prices of fresh vegetables and fruit have dropped in the past year following a period of high inflation in the category.

Table of Content

OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition
Vegetables
Fruit

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Lower income Canadians are less likely to eat fresh vegetables
Figure 1: Vegetable consumption, household with an income under $25K vs overall population, February 2017
Over a third of parents need help in getting their kids to eat fruits and vegetables
Figure 2: Agreement with the statement “It is difficult to get children to eat vegetables”, by parentage, February 2017
A third of Canadians are eating less produce due to price
Figure 3: Agreement with statement “I am purchasing less produce as it has become more expensive”, by current financial situation, February 2017
The opportunities
Innovation in waste reduction can convey value
Figure 4: Top five products consumers would be interested in trying, February 2017
Alternative formats a viable strategy in boosting produce consumption
Figure 5: Agreement with “I get some of my vegetable or fruit servings from other formats”, by age, February 2017
Promoting benefits from superfood can help in connecting with the Canadian consumer
Figure 6: Interested in vegetable or fruits with superfood benefits, by province, February 2017
What it means

THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Cost of fruits and vegetables drops for consumers
Canada’s Food Guide encourages fruit and vegetable consumption

MARKET FACTORS
Immigration fuelling Canada’s population growth
Figure 7: Foreign-born share of population by G8 country and Australia
Cost of fruits and vegetables drops in Canada
Canada’s Food Guide encourages fruit and vegetable consumption
Figure 8: Leading causes of death in Canada, 2013
Focus on health and weight management to continue
Figure 9: Body mass index, self-reported rate of being overweight or obese among Canadian adults, by gender, 2010-14

KEY PLAYERS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Historical inflation impacts consumers’ perception on price
Canadians are expanding their produce palate
Green protein to play a more prominent role in diets
Produce delivery can help Canadians meet their dietary needs

WHAT’S WORKING?
Canadians are expanding their produce palate
Figure 10: Percentage of US adults who have purchased the following fruits to eat at home in the past month, April 2016
Convenient formats lower barriers for eating fruits and vegetables
Figure 11: President’s Choice Avocado Chunks (Canada), November 2016
Figure 12: President’s Choice Coconut Chunks (Canada), December 2016
Figure 13: Tesco VitaKids Baby Carrot (UK), September 2016
Figure 14: Green Giant Fresh Green Giant Fresh Thai Soup Blend (Canada), October 2016
Figure 15: CleverFoodies Scramble Rancheros Scramble Veggies & Herbs (Canada), February 2016
Figure 16: Moov Organic Cauliflower Florets (Canada), November 2016

CHALLENGES
Climate change creates challenges in the market
Historical inflation impacts consumers’ perception on price
Food swamps prominent in Canada’s largest city (Toronto)

WHAT TO LOOK OUT FOR?
Produce delivery can help Canadians meet their dietary needs
Bringing ‘the farm’ to the city
Figure 17: Plant it Forward with Kashi, March 2014
Umami is not just for meat
Green protein to play a more prominent role in diets

THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Nearly all Canadians eat fruits and/or vegetables
Price a key driver for selecting vegetables and fruit
Access to fresh fruits and vegetables viewed as a right by Canadians
Alternative formats a means to drive incremental usage with consumers
Half of Canadians are open to supercharged health benefits

FRUIT AND VEGETABLE USAGE
Nearly all Canadians eat fruits and/or vegetables
Figure 18: Typed of vegetables purchased, February 2017
Figure 19: Types of fruits purchased, February 2017
Demographic and economic variables impacted produce usage
Figure 20: Fresh, loose vegetable and fruit purchase, by age and gender, February 2017
Figure 21: Vegetable consumption, household with an income under $25K vs overall population, February 2017
Figure 22: Importance of price when choosing fruit, by age and income, February 2017
Figure 23: Importance of price when choosing vegetables, by age and income, February 2017
Putting ‘isms’ in perspective
Figure 24: Types of diet, by type, February 2017
Figure 25: Vegetarian/vegan, by age and gender, February 2017

PRICE AND VALUE IN PRODUCE
Price key driver for selecting vegetables and fruit
Figure 26: Important factors when choosing vegetables and fruit, February 2017
Waste reduction can be used to convey value
Figure 27: President’s Reusable Produce Bags (Canada), March 2011
Figure 28: SC Johnson Ziploc Fresh Produce Bags (Canada), February 2012
Figure 29: Rubbermaid Produce Container (Canada), November 2010
Figure 30: Rubbermaid FreshWorks Produce Saver, April 2016

PRODUCE AND HEALTH
Access to fresh fruits and vegetables viewed as a right by Canadians
Figure 31: Agreement with “it is important for everyone to have access to fresh produce”, February 2017
No dessert until you eat your vegetables!
Figure 32: Agreement with “it is difficult to get children to eat vegetables”, by parentage, February 2017
Figure 33: KD Kraft Dinner Smart Three Cheese Macaroni & Cheese (Canada), April 2016
Figure 34: Catelli Smart Veggie Macaroni (Canada), May 2016
Figure 35: Dempster’s Bakery Garden Vegetable Bagels (Canada), July 2014
Figure 36: Dare Breton Garden Vegetable Crackers (India), April 2017
Figure 37: Sneaky Chef Parmesan Romano Pasta Sauce (US), July 2015
Figure 38: Sneaky Chef Smooth Red Pasta Sauce (US), July 2015
Figure 39: Single Serve Mac & Cheese from Sneaky Blends by Missy Chase Lapine, October 2016
Demand for GMO-free produce needs context
Figure 40: Importance of pesticide-free, organic and GMO-free, February 2017
Figure 41: The Journey to Harvest, November 2016
Leveraging provenance at grocers
Figure 42: Importance of locally grown and in-season, February 2017

OPPORTUNITIES FOR INNOVATION IN PRODUCE
Alternative formats a means to drive incremental usage with consumers
Figure 43: Agreement with “I get some of my vegetable or fruit servings from other formats”, by age, February 2017
Figure 44: The Protein Works Berry Flavour Superfood Bites (UK), October 2016
Figure 45: Dole Fruitocracy Apple Pineapple Squeezable Fruit Pouch (US), November 2016
Figure 46: Welch’s Premium Juice Ice Bars (Canada), August 2015
Half of Canadians are open to supercharged health benefits
Figure 47: Products consumers would be interested in trying, February 2017
Figure 48: Go Gourmet Organic Slammers Epic Superfood Snack (US), November 2016
Figure 49: Ready Pac Produce Go-Go-Goji Superfood Salad (US), July 2016
Figure 50: Feel Good Superfoods Goji Berries (US), July 2016
Figure 51: Ice Cream Factory Coco Superfood Coconut Ice Cream with Acai & Mulberries (Germany), August 2016
Figure 52: Nicoya Enrichment Satay Chickpea and Red Quinoa Tribal Superfood (Ireland), November 2016
Figure 53: Prairie Naturals Superfoods Coconut Chips with Organic Dark Chocolate (Canada), November 2016
Inspiration for innovation can travel from abroad
Figure 54: BOL Salad Jar The Japanese Salad (UK), June 2016
Figure 55: BOL Salad Jar The Mediterranean Salad (UK), June 2016

CONSUMER SEGMENTS
Americans experience less access to fresh vegetables
Figure 56: Vegetables purchased, US vs Canada, February 2016 (US)/February 2017 (Canada)
Figure 57: Fresh, loose vegetables purchased, by geographical setting and country, February 2016 (US)/February 2017 (Canada)
Figure 58: Fresh, loose vegetables purchased, by select income break, February 2016 (US) vs February 2017 (Canada)
Quebec and BC: a tale of two provinces
Figure 59: Products consumers would be interested in trying, Quebec vs BC, February 2017

APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
Data sources
Consumer survey data
Consumer qualitative research
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations

List of Table

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