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Tea and Other Hot Drinks - UK - June 2013

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Jun 2013

Category :

Beverages

No. of Pages : 243 Pages


Tea enjoys a long-established role as a quintessentially British drink. Even today, the majority of consumers see tea drinking as part of being British, and report enjoying the ritual of drinking tea, offering a strong platform for communication around these issues.
Table of Conent

Introduction
Definition
Excluded
Abbreviations

Executive Summary
The market
The future
Figure 1: Retail value sales and forecast of tea*, UK, by value, 2007-17
Figure 2: Retail value sales and forecast of hot chocolate and malted drinks, UK, by value, 2007-17
Market factors
Growth in 25-34s will support the market
Health remains an issue
Encouraging consumers to trade up to more premium tea will add value to the market
Companies, brands and innovation
Unilever leads the market
Figure 3: Estimated manufacturer shares in the UK retail tea market, by value, 2012/13*
NPD continues to drive the market
Unilever dominates ad investment
The consumer
Almost nine in ten drink tea
Figure 4: Consumption of tea, hot chocolate and malted drinks, February 2013
Standard tea deemed traditional and refreshing
Figure 5: Correspondence analysis of qualities associated with selected hot drinks, February 2013
Three in four see tea drinking as a British trait
Figure 6: Agreement with statements on standard tea and speciality tea, February 2013
Herbal teas are healthier than standard, according to a third
Figure 7: Agreement with statements on herbal tea, February 2013
Sizeable minority see hot chocolate as a ‘treat’
Figure 8: Attitudes towards hot chocolate and malted drinks, February 2013
What we think

Issues in the Market
How can the market stem the decline in everyday tea?
How can the market expand usage among older consumers?
Is tea making the most of its British claim?
Can targeting consumers’ need states broaden usage of herbal teas?
Should hot chocolate be placing greater emphasis on health?

Trend Application
Help Me Help Myself
Objectify
Mintel Futures: East Meets West

Market Drivers
Key points
Downward trend in tea consumption
Figure 9: Household purchased quantities of tea, cocoa/chocolate drinks and malt drinks, average per person, per week, 1974-2011
Tea prices look to be heading upwards again
Figure 10: Retail Price Index for tea, coffee and other hot drinks and soft drinks, January 2006-April 2013
Cocoa prices stabilise
Brands fail to drive commitment
Figure 11: Brand commitment, selected tea brands, March 2013
British provenance could be leveraged further
Figure 12: Factors influencing choice when buying food and (non-alcoholic) drink, March 2013
Demographic changes
Growth in 25-34s bodes well for the market
Figure 13: Trends in the age structure of the UK population, 2007-12 and 2012-17
Decline in ABC1s could threaten premiumisation in the market
Figure 14: Forecast adult population trends, by socio-economic group, 2008-18

Strengths and Weaknesses
Strengths
Weaknesses

Who’s Innovating?
Key points
Tea category dominates NPD…
Figure 15: Share of NPD in tea and other hot drinks market, by sub-category, 2009-13
…with Twinings leading NPD in tea
Figure 16: Product launches within the UK tea market, by leading companies, 2009-13
Morrisons steps up innovation in hot chocolate and malted drinks
Sizeable innovation on flavour within tea market
Figure 17: New product launches within the UK tea market, by flavour component, 2009-13
Premiumisation becomes a focus of NPD
Calorie content is less of a focus in 2012 for hot chocolate and malted drinks
Figure 18: Top ten claims in hot chocolate and malted drinks market, 2009-13

Market Size and Forecast
Key points
Growth in value sales, decline in volumes for tea
Figure 19: UK retail value sales of tea*, 2007-17
Figure 20: Retail value sales and forecast of tea*, UK, by value, 2007-17
Value and volume growth expected to pick up in hot chocolate and malted drinks
Figure 21: Retail value sales of hot chocolate and malted drinks, UK, 2007-17
Figure 22: Retail value sales and forecast of hot chocolate and malted drinks, UK, by value, 2007-17
Methodology

Segment Performance
Key points
Standard tea continues to dominate, despite stalling sales
Figure 23: UK retail value sales of tea, by segment, 2010-12
Figure 24: UK retail volume sales of tea, by segment, 2012
Sales rebound in 2012 for hot chocolate and malted drinks
Figure 25: UK retail value sales of hot chocolate and malted drinks, by sector, 2010-12

Market Share
Key points
Unilever is the leading manufacturer in the tea market
Figure 26: Leading manufacturers’ sales and shares in the UK retail tea market, by value and volume, 2012 and 2013
PG Tips sees value sales decline but still dominates the market
Figure 27: Leading brands’ sales and shares in the UK retail tea market, by value and volume, 2012 and 2013
Cadbury increases sales in the hot chocolate and malted drinks sector
Figure 28: Leading brands’ sales and shares in the UK retail hot chocolate and malted drinks market, by value and volume, 2012 and 2013

Companies and Products
Apeejay (Typhoo)
Product range
Recent activity
Associated British Foods (Twinings, Ovaltine)
Product range and innovation
Recent activity
GlaxoSmithKline (Horlicks)
Product range
Recent activity
Mondelēz International (Cadbury)
Product range and innovation
Recent activity
Taylors of Harrogate (Yorkshire Tea)
Product range
Recent activity
Tata Global Beverages (Tetley)
Product range and innovation
Recent activity
Unilever (PG Tips, Lipton)
Product range and innovation
Recent activity

Brand Research
Brand map
Figure 29: Attitudes towards and usage of brands in the tea sector, March 2013
Correspondence analysis
Brand attitudes
Figure 30: Attitudes, by tea brand, March 2013
Brand personality
Figure 31: Tea brand personality – macro image, March 2013
Figure 32: Tea brand personality – micro image, March 2013
Brand experience
Figure 33: Tea brand usage, March 2013
Figure 34: Satisfaction with various tea brands, March 2013
Figure 35: Consideration of tea brands, March 2013
Figure 36: Consumer perceptions of current tea brand performance, March 2013
Figure 37: Tea brand recommendation – Net Promoter Score, March 2013
Brand index
Figure 38: Tea brand index, March 2013
Figure 39: Tea brand index vs recommendation, March 2013
Target group analysis
Figure 40: Target groups, March 2013
Figure 41: Tea brand usage, by target groups, March 2013
Group One – Conformists
Group Two – Simply the Best
Group Three – Shelf Stalkers
Group Four – Habitual Shoppers
Group Five – Individualists

Brand Communication and Promotion
Key points
Total adspend decreases in 2012
Figure 42: Main monitored media advertising expenditure in the tea and hot drinks market, 2009-13
Unilever continues to dominate market in 2012
Figure 43: Main monitored advertising expenditure in the UK tea and hot drinks market, by top ten advertisers, 2009-13
Figure 44: Monitored advertising expenditure in the UK tea and hot drinks market, by top five brands, 2012
TV accounts for almost three quarters of spend
Figure 45: Advertising expenditure in the UK tea and hot drinks market, by media type, 2009-13

Channels to Market
Key points
Supermarkets dominate distribution
Figure 46: Estimated consumer spending on soft drinks (including tea and other hot drinks), by type of retailer, 2012
Specialists and brands move online to connect with shoppers

Consumer – Usage
Key points
Almost nine in ten drink tea
Figure 47: Consumption of tea, hot chocolate and malted drinks, February 2013
Majority drink tea on a daily basis
Figure 48: Consumption of tea, hot chocolate and malted drinks, by frequency, February 2013
25-34s are the core users
Figure 49: Consumption of tea, hot chocolate and malted drinks, by age, February 2013

Consumer – Qualities Associated with Hot Drinks
Key points
Standard tea deemed traditional and refreshing
Figure 50: Correspondence analysis of qualities associated with selected hot drinks, February 2013
Figure 51: Qualities associated with selected hot drinks, February 2013
Speciality tea enjoys premium status…
…while herbal tea is seen to be healthy
Hot chocolate should continue to market the notion of indulgence
Figure 52: Selected words associated with hot chocolate, by gender and age, February 2013
Methodology

Consumer Attitudes Towards Tea
Key points
Three in four see tea drinking as a British trait
Figure 53: Agreement with statements on standard tea and speciality tea, February 2013
The ritual of drinking tea appeals to majority
16-24s are adventurous on flavour, over-65s are brand-loyal
Figure 54: Agreement with statements on brand loyalty and trying tea flavours in standard tea and speciality tea, by age, February 2013
Encouraging consumers to trade up to more premium tea will add value to the market

Consumer Attitudes Towards Herbal Tea
Key points
Herbal teas are healthier than standard, according to a third
Figure 55: Agreement with statements on herbal tea, February 2013
Figure 56: Agreement with the statements ‘Herbal teas are healthier than standard tea’ and ‘I use herbal teas for their functional benefits (eg camomile tea for soothing)’, by gender and age, February 2013
Taste is a barrier for a fifth

Consumer Attitudes Towards Hot Chocolate and Malted Drinks
Key points
Sizeable minority see hot chocolate as a ‘treat’
Figure 57: Attitudes towards hot chocolate and malted drinks, February 2013
A fifth limit consumption, especially women
Driving usage beyond a ‘cold’ weather accompaniment
Habits differ depending on age
Figure 58: Attitudes towards hot chocolate and malted drinks, by age, February 2013

Appendix – Market Drivers
Figure 59: Trends in the age structure of the UK population, 2007-17
Figure 60: Forecast adult population trends, by socio-economic group, 2008-18
Figure 61: UK households, by size, 2007-17

Appendix – Who’s Innovating?
Figure 62: NPD in the UK tea market, by private label vs branded, 2009-13
Figure 63: NPD in the UK malt and other hot drinks market, by private label vs branded, 2009-13
Figure 64: Top ten claims in tea market, 2009-13
Figure 65: Top ten claims in malt and other hot drinks market, 2009-13

Appendix – Market Size and Forecast
Figure 66: Best- and worst-case forecasts for retail sales of tea, by value, 2012-17
Figure 67: Best- and worst-case forecasts for retail sales of tea, by volume, 2012-17
Figure 68: UK retail sales of tea, market size and forecast, by volume, 2007-17
Figure 69: Best- and worst-case forecasts for retail sales of hot chocolate and malted drinks, by value, 2012-17
Figure 70: Best- and worst-case forecasts for retail sales of hot chocolate and malted drinks, by volume, 2012-17
Figure 71: UK retail sales of hot chocolate and malted drinks, market size and forecast, by volume, 2007-17

Appendix – Brand Research
Figure 72: Brand usage, March 2013
Figure 73: Brand commitment, March 2013
Figure 74: Brand momentum, March 2013
Figure 75: Brand diversity, March 2013
Figure 76: Brand satisfaction, March 2013
Figure 77: Brand recommendation, March 2013
Figure 78: Brand attitude, March 2013
Figure 79: Brand image – macro image, March 2013
Figure 80: Brand image – micro image, March 2013
Figure 81: Profile of target groups, by demographics, March 2013
Figure 82: Psychographic segmentation, by target groups, March 2013
Brand index
Figure 83: Brand index, March 2013

Appendix – Brand Communication and Promotion
Figure 84: Main monitored media advertising expenditure in the tea and other hot drinks market, by category, 2009-13

Appendix – Consumer Usage
Figure 85: Consumption of tea, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 86: Consumption of green/herbal tea, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 87: Consumption of standard tea (ie English Breakfast), by demographics, February 2013
Figure 88: Consumption of hot chocolate, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 89: Consumption of hot malted drink/malted chocolate drink, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 90: Consumption of speciality tea, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 91: Consumption of green tea, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 92: Consumption of other herbal tea, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 93: Consumption of other type of tea, by demographics, February 2013

Appendix – Consumer – Qualities Associated with Hot Drinks
Figure 94: Most popular words associated with coffee, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 95: Next most popular words associated with coffee, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 96: Most popular words associated with standard tea, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 97: Next most popular words associated with standard tea, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 98: Most popular words associated with speciality tea, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 99: Next most popular words associated with speciality tea, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 100: Most popular words associated with herbal tea, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 101: Next most popular words associated with herbal tea, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 102: Most popular words associated with hot chocolate, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 103: Next most popular words associated with hot chocolate, by demographics, February 2013

Appendix – Consumer Attitudes Towards Tea
Figure 104: Agreement with statements on standard tea and speciality tea, February 2013
Figure 105: Agreement with the statements ‘Drinking tea is part of being British’ and ‘I enjoy the ritual of tea drinking’, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 106: Agreement with the statements ‘I tend to use the same brand of tea all the time’ and ‘Own-label tea is as good as branded varieties’, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 107: Agreement with the statements ‘I enjoy trying different tea flavours’ and ‘I would like to see a wider variety of storage packs’, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 108: Agreement with the statements ‘Ethical varieties are worth paying more for’ and ‘I wouldn’t feel confident preparing loose tea’, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 109: Agreement with the statements ‘Loose tea is better quality than teabags’ and ‘It is worth paying extra for speciality teas’, by demographics, February 2013

Appendix – Consumer Attitudes Towards Herbal Tea
Figure 110: Agreement with most popular statements on herbal tea, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 111: Agreement with next most popular statements on herbal tea, by demographics, February 2013

Appendix – Consumer Attitudes Towards Hot Chocolate and Malted Drinks
Figure 112: Agreement with most popular statements on hot chocolate and malted drinks, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 113: Agreement with next most popular statements on hot chocolate and malted drinks, by demographics, February 2013
Figure 114: Agreement with other statements on hot chocolate and malted drinks, by demographics, February 2013

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