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Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting 2012-2022: Forecasts, Technologies, Players

IDTechEx
Published Date » 2012-07-31
No. Of Pages » 138

Piezoelectric energy harvesters generate electricity depending on the amount of force used in compressing or deforming the material, the amount and type of deformation of the material's crystal structure and the speed or frequency of compressions or vibrations to the material. There are more than 200 appropriate materials which need careful selection for the particular application.
 
This report is the first to assess the progress, applications, players, challenges and forecasts of piezoelectric energy harvesters. Many companies are developing piezoelectric energy harvesters to power consumer electronics, sensors and much more. Already the huge success for this type of energy harvester is in creating the electrical arcs in cigarette lighters, but the future for this technology is much more exciting. Piezoelectric energy harvesters offer among the highest efficiency and power output by size and cost and are therefore very appealing. However, there are also challenges of reliability and broad band performance that need to be addressed.

Covering the exciting new options

This new report from IDTechEx covers the wide range of materials and form factors, from MEMs, to paint and spray versions, to ribbons and nanowires. It profiles the latest work commercially and academically.

Ten year forecasts 2013-2023

The report provides forecasts for piezoelectric energy harvesters for the following application segments. For each, it gives the number of energy harvesting units forecast to be bought, average sales price and the total spend in US $.
  • Pavements, Roads, railroads
  • Lighters and other electrical
  • Consumer Electronics
  • Other industrial Switches
  • Remote Controls
  • Pushbutton industrial sensors
  • Electronic locks/access control devices
  • Toys and gadgets
  • Military
  • Aerospace
  • Vehicle sensors
  • Healthcare

In particular, this report covers;
  • What piezoelectric energy harvesting is and how it works
  • What materials are used and how they are made - including PZT, Single Crystal Piezo and Piezo Fibre Composite
  • Key enablers for the future - printed piezoelectrics, smart substrates, ribbons, fibres and MEMS
  • A comparison between piezoelectric energy harvesting and alternative options
  • How to harvest energy from vibration and movement
  • Applications in consumer electronics, automotive, health, WSN, lighting and switching
  • Detailed market forecasts for 2013-2023 by application type
  • Technical challenges and how these are being tackled
  • Leading developers of piezo electric energy harvesters
Table of Contents

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

2. INTRODUCTION TO PIEZOELECTRIC ENERGY HARVESTING 
2.1. What is piezoelectric energy harvesting? 
2.2. How piezoelectricity works 
2.3. How piezoelectric materials are made 
2.4. PZT - leading piezoelectric material used today 
2.5. Single Crystal Piezo 
2.6. Piezo Fibre Composites PFCs and IDEPFC 
2.6.1. Piezo and pyroelectric energy sources 
2.7. Power requirements of different devices 
2.8. Piezoelectric energy harvesting compared with alternatives 

3. PIEZOELECTRICS AS AN ENERGY HARVESTER 
3.1. Vibration harvesting 
3.1.1. Wideband 
3.1.2. Damping 
3.1.3. Remote controllers 
3.2. Movement harvesting options 
3.2.1. Application Case Study: Power paving 
3.2.2. Application Case Study:: Duke University Harvesting energy from natural motion 
3.2.3. Morgan Technical Ceramics: Development of energy-harvesting mat 
3.2.4. Princeton Energy harvesting rubber sheets 
3.2.5. Application Case Study:: CEA/Leti-Minatec Harnessing vibrations from raindrops 
3.2.6. Application Case Study: SolarBionic Vibration harvesting 
3.2.7. Application Case Study: CORNELL: Flapping leaf generator for wind energy harvesting 

4. NEW MATERIALS AND FORM FACTORS FOR PIEZOELECTRIC ENERGY HARVESTERS 
4.1. MEMS piezo electric energy harvesting 
4.1.1. MEMs piezoelectric harvester with record power output 
4.2. Thin film, printed, spray-on piezoelectric energy harvesters 
4.3. Thermal Acoustic Piezo Energy Conversion 
4.3.1. Turning heat into sound, then electricity 
4.4. Piezoelectric ribbons and fibres 
4.5. Zinc oxide nanowires 
4.5.1. Piezoelectric graphene 
4.5.2. Graphene can behave like a piezoelectric material 
4.6. Optimal shape piezoelectric energy harvesters 
4.7. Technique for fabricating piezoelectric ferroelectric nanostructures 
4.8. Giant piezoelectric effect to improve energy harvesting devices 
4.9. Potential for lead-free piezoelectric ceramics 
4.10. Electro-active papers 
4.11. Electroactive Polymers and Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Devices 
4.12. Piezoelectric fabric that can detect and produce sound 

5. APPLICATIONS OF PIEZOELECTRIC ENERGY HARVESTERS 
5.1. Consumer Electronics 
5.1.1. Application Case Study: Michigan Tech: Energy harvesting backpack 
5.1.2. Piezoelectric kinetic energy harvester for mobile phones from Nokia 
5.1.3. Small scale wind turbines 
5.2. Energy harvesting for Vehicles 
5.2.1. Application Case Study: Piezo Power Source for tyre pressure monitoring 
5.2.2. Application Case Study: Piezoelectric roads for California 
5.2.3. Application Case Study: Energy harvesting for robots 
5.3. Healthcare 
5.3.1. Application Case Study: Breakthroughs with sensing in the human body 
5.4. Powering Wireless Sensors 
5.4.1. Application Case Study: Printing Piezo Energy Harvesters 
5.5. Switching and Lighting: Piezoelectric Energy harvesting 
5.5.1. Application Case Study: PulseSwitch Systems 

6. MARKET FORECASTS 
6.1. Short term challenges in the energy harvesting market 

7. COMPANY PROFILES 
7.1. Advanced Cerametrics 
7.2. Agency for Defense Development 
7.3. Algra 
7.4. Arveni 
7.5. Boeing 
7.6. Carnegie Mellon University 
7.7. Chinese University of Hong Kong 
7.8. Fraunhofer IKTS 
7.9. Georgia Institute of Technology 
7.10. Holst Centre 
7.11. Honeywell 
7.12. IMEC 
7.13. Imperial College 
7.14. ITT 
7.15. Meggitt Sensing Systems 
7.16. MicroStrain Inc. 
7.17. Midé Technology Corporation 
7.18. National Taiwan University, 
7.19. NNL - Universita del Salento 
7.20. PulseSwitch Systems 
7.21. Shanghai Jiao Tong University 
7.22. Smart Material Corp. 
7.23. Technical University of Ilmenau 
7.24. Texas Micropower 
7.25. Tokyo Institute of Technology 
7.26. Tyndall National Institute 
7.27. University of Idaho 
7.28. University of Princeton 
7.29. Virginia Tech 

8. REFERENCES 

APPENDIX 1: IDTECHEX PUBLICATIONS AND CONSULTANCY 

List of Tables

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List of Figures

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