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Organic Food and Drink - UK - October 2013

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Oct 2013

Category :

Alcoholic Beverages

No. of Pages : 130 Pages


It is important for organic brands to communicate to shoppers in a more effective way the tangible, concrete benefits their products offer them. Given the vast amount of product information that is already competing for shoppers’ attention, clear, dynamic labels that can be understood at a glance are needed.
TABLE OF CONTENT

Introduction
Definition
Abbreviations

Executive Summary
The market
Figure 1: UK retail value sales of organic foods, 2008-18
Figure 2: UK retail value sales of organic foods, by category, 2013 (est)
Market factors
Organic is a low priority
Figure 3: Factors influencing choice when buying food and (non-alcoholic) drink, March 2013
The younger generation are cause for optimism
Slowing upward mobility presents a challenge
Growth in consumer spending should support growth
Companies, brands and innovation
No end to the decline in organic food and drink NPD
Figure 4: Share of organic products in all food and drink NPD, 2009-13
A steady rise in adspend
The consumer
Organic continues to enjoy widespread appeal
Figure 6: Changes in organic food and drink purchases, August 2013
The appeal of organic varies significantly by segment
Figure 7: Types of organic food and drink purchased, August 2013
No one benefit of organic stands out
Figure 8: Reasons for buying organic food and drink, August 2013
Consumers are swayed by promotions
Figure 9: Attitudes towards organic food and drink, August 2013
Poor price perceptions remain the biggest barrier
Figure 10: Non-users’ attitudes towards organic food and drink, August 2013
What we think

Issues in the Market
What impact has the horsemeat scandal had on the organic food market?
What barriers does the market face in capitalising on the predicted growth in consumer spending?
How can brands more effectively communicate the benefits of the organic label?
Will a change in EU organic regulation benefit the market?

Trend Application
Trend: Prove It
Trend: Edutainment
Mintel Futures: Access Anything, Anywhere

Market Drivers
Key points
British origin is the most important issue in food choices
Figure 11: Factors influencing choice when buying food and (non-alcoholic) drink, March 2013
Organic is low down on consumers’ agendas
Growth in 25-34s bodes well for the market
Figure 12: Trends in the age structure of the UK population, 2008-13 and 2013-18
The market is dealt a blow by the slowdown in the growth of ABs
Figure 13: Forecast adult population trends, by socio-economic group, 2008-18
Value takes priority as incomes are squeezed…
Figure 14: Consumer Price Indices, all items and food, Q1 2008-Q1 2013
but tentative improvement in consumer expenditure
Figure 15: GDP, PDI and consumer expenditure, at constant 2013 prices, 2008-18

Strengths and Weaknesses
Strengths
Weaknesses

Who’s Innovating?
Key points
No end to the decline in organic food and drink NPD
Figure 16: Share of organic products in all food and drink NPD, 2009-13
Figure 17: Share of organic products in total NPD in selected categories, 2010-13
Baby food remains an important category for organic NPD
Figure 18: Share of product categories in overall organic food and drink NPD, 2009-13
The organic market is highly fragmented
Figure 19: Top 15 brands in 2012, by share of launches in the UK organic food and drink market, 2009-13

Market Size and Forecast
Key points
Value sales of organic have declined by over a quarter
Figure 20: UK retail value sales of organic food, 2008-18
The future
Figure 21: UK retail value sales of organic foods, 2008-18
Forecast methodology

Segment Performance
Key points
Fruit and veg and dairy account for two thirds of organic food sales
Figure 22: UK retail value sales of organic foods, by category, 2013 (est)
Figure 23: Year-on-year % change in organic food sales, by category, 2012 and 2013
An end to the decline in organic fruit and veg sales in 2013
Figure 24: UK retail sales of organic fruit and vegetables, by value, 2008-18
The organic dairy market rebounds in 2013
Figure 25: UK retail sales of organic dairy products, by value, 2008-18
Baby food and drink continues to grow its share of organic food sales
Figure 26: UK retail sales of organic baby food and infant formula, by value, 2008-18
Small decline anticipated for organic meat, fish and poultry sales in 2013
Figure 27: UK retail sales of organic meat, poultry and fish, by value, 2008-18
Another tough year for the organic egg market
Figure 28: UK retail sales of organic eggs, by value, 2008-18

Companies and Products
Rachel’s
Yeo Valley
Duchy Originals from Waitrose
Seeds of Change
Organix
Green & Black’s
Organic Farm Foods
The Soil Association
The Organic Trade Board
Abel & Cole
Riverford Organic Farms

Brand Communication and Promotion
Key points
A steady rise in adspend
Figure 29: Main monitored media advertising expenditure on organic food and drink, by selected leading organic brands, 2009-13
HiPP takes the lead in adspend in 2012
Figure 30: Advertising expenditure on organic foods, by company, selected advertisers, 2009-13
Figure 31: Share of advertising expenditure on organic foods, by company, selected advertisers, 2009-13
Rachel’s invests heavily in advertising for the first time in 2011
Green & Black’s cuts back on adspend in 2012
TV continues to dominate adspend
Figure 32: Share of advertising expenditure on organic foods, by media, selected advertisers, 2009-13
Soil Association
Figure 33: Share of advertising expenditure on organic foods, by media, the Soil Association, 2009-13
‘Organic. Naturally Different’ campaign in its third year
Figure 34: Advertising expenditure on organic foods, by media, The Organic Trade Board, 2010-13

Channels to Market
Key points
Supermarkets dominate distribution in organic food
Figure 35: UK retail value sales of organic foods, by outlet type, 2009-12
One bright spot comes from online retailers and box schemes

Consumer – Usage of Organic Food and Drink
Key points
Majority of Britons made organic purchases in the year to August 2013
Figure 36: Changes in organic food and drink purchases, August 2013
Organic buying peaks among under-35s and ABs
Figure 37: Consumers who have bought organic food and drink in the last 12 months, by age and socio-economic group, August 2013
Tight finances have seen consumers cut back

Consumer – Types of Organic Food and Drink Purchased
Key points
Vegetables are the most commonly purchased organic food
Figure 38: Types of organic food and drink purchased, August 2013
Purchasing of meat, poultry and dairy lags behind eggs
Under-25s are the core buyers of many types of organic food/drink
Figure 39: Selected types of organic food and drink purchased, by age, August 2013

Consumer – Reasons for Buying Organic Food and Drink
Key points
No one benefit of organic stands out
Figure 40: Reasons for buying organic food and drink, August 2013
Quality and health perceptions are key motivations
Figure 41: Consumers who buy organic food/drink because it’s higher quality and because it is better for them because it’s free from chemicals and pesticides, by age, August 2013
Animal welfare standards are less important

Consumer – Attitudes towards Organic Food and Drink – Users
Key points
Promotions would drive more organic sales
Figure 42: Attitudes towards organic food and drink, August 2013
Notable demand for more own-label organic options among over-55s
Figure 43: Agreement with the statements ‘I would buy more organic food and drink if there were more deals available’ and ‘I would like to see a wider variety of supermarket own-label organic food and drink’, by gender and age, August 2013
Limited demand for better availability at supermarkets
One in three want more information
Under-25s are most influenced by celebrity chefs
The horsemeat scandal has helped boost the appeal of organic

Consumer – Attitudes towards Organic Food and Drink – Non-users
Key points
Price is the major sticking point
Figure 44: Non-users’ attitudes towards organic food and drink, August 2013
Over-55s are the biggest sceptics
Figure 45: Selected attitudes towards organic food and drink, August 2013

Appendix – Who’s Innovating?
Figure 46: Share of branded vs. own-label launches in overall organic food and drink NPD, 2009-13

Appendix – Market Size and Forecast
Figure 47: Best- and worst-case forecasts for UK retail sales of organic food, by value, 2013-18

Appendix – Segment Performance
Figure 48: Best- and worst-case forecasts for UK retail sales of organic fruit and vegetables, by value, 2013-18
Figure 49: Best- and worst-case forecasts for UK retail sales of organic dairy products, by value, 2013-18
Figure 50: Best- and worst-case forecasts for UK retail sales of organic baby food and infant formula, by value, 2013-18
Figure 51: Best- and worst-case forecasts for UK retail sales of organic prepared meals and grocery, by value, 2013-18
Figure 52: Best- and worst-case forecasts for UK retail sales of organic meat, poultry and fish, by value, 2013-18
Figure 53: Best- and worst-case forecasts for UK retail sales of organic bread, bakery and cereals, by value, 2013-18
Figure 54: Best- and worst-case forecasts for UK retail sales of organic eggs, by value, 2013-18

Appendix – Consumer – Usage of Organic Food and Drink
Figure 55: Changes in organic food and drink purchases, by demographics, August 2013

Appendix – Consumer – Types of Organic Food and Drink Purchased
Figure 56: Most popular types of organic food and drink purchased, by demographics, August 2013
Figure 57: Next most popular types of organic food and drink purchased, by demographics, August 2013
Figure 58: Other types of organic food and drink purchased, by demographics, August 2013
Figure 59: Repertoire for types of organic food and drink purchased, by demographics, August 2013

Appendix – Consumer – Reasons for Buying Organic Food and Drink
Figure 60: Most popular reasons for buying organic food/drink, by demographics, August 2013
Figure 61: Next most popular reasons for buying organic food/drink, by demographics, August 2013

Appendix – Consumer – Attitudes towards Organic Food and Drink – Users
Figure 62: Most popular attitudes towards organic food/drink, by demographics, August 2013
Figure 63: Next most popular attitudes towards organic food/drink, by demographics, August 2013
Figure 64: Other attitudes towards organic food/drink, by demographics, August 2013

Appendix – Consumer – Attitudes towards Organic Food and Drink – Non-users
Figure 65: Most popular attitudes towards organic food/drink, by demographics, August 2013
Figure 66: Next most popular attitudes towards organic food/drink, by demographics, August 2013

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