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Menswear - UK - March 2015

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Mar 2015

Category :

Apparel

No. of Pages : 101 Pages

The men’s clothing market has been growing at a faster rate than womenswear. Discounting has been a big issue across the clothing sector, but menswear is likely to have benefited from fewer men being interested in special offers than women.
Table of Content

Introduction

Definitions
Abbreviations

Executive Summary

The market
Figure 1: Best and worst case forecast of UK sales of men’s outerwear, 2009-19
Market drivers
Declining youth population poses a challenge
Male obesity on the rise
Companies, brands and innovation
Brand research
Figure 2: Attitudes towards and usage of selected brands, January 2015 and November 2014
Figure 3: Attitudes, by brand, January 2015 and November 2014
The consumer
Men buy clothes, but also add to savings
Figure 4: Activities men have done in the last three months, January 2014 and 2015
Over one fifth of men wear plus-sizes
Figure 5: Men’s UK clothing size/waist sizes, January 2015
Primark leads
Figure 6: Retailers from where men bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months, split by in-store and online, January 2015
Men spend the same, while women cut back
Figure 7: Changes in shopping behaviour for number of items of clothing bought and amount spent in the last 12 months, January 2015
Three in ten men buy clothes on sale
Figure 8: Male shopping behaviour when buying clothes in-store or online, January 2015
Smart fitting rooms pique male interest
Figure 9: Men’s attitudes to innovations when shopping for clothes in-store and online, January 2015
What we think

Issues and Insights

How has the menswear market performed?
The facts
The implications
What are the opportunities for growth?
The facts
The implications
What innovations can help to drive interest in the menswear market?
The facts
The implications

Trend Application

Guiding Choice
Make it Mine
The Big Issue

Market Environment

Key points
Declining youth population poses a challenge
Figure 10: Trends in the age structure of the UK male population, 2009-19
Promising employment projections
Figure 11: Male employment and unemployment, 2009-19
Obesity on the rise
Figure 12: Proportion of overweight and obese males aged 16+, 2007-13
Men’s finances remain steady
Figure 13: How respondents describe their financial situation, by gender, January 2015
Figure 14: Current financial situation compared with a year ago, by gender, January 2015
53% of men now own a tablet
Figure 15: Household ownership of computers, tablets and e-readers, by gender, December 2014
Three quarters own a smartphone
Figure 16: Personal ownership of mobile phones, by gender, December 2014

Strengths and Weaknesses in the Market

Strengths
Weaknesses

Who’s Innovating?

Key points
Creative marketing
Fashion for the big screen
Pushing into menswear
Marketing at festivals
New hub for men’s wedding style advice
Figure 17: Screenshot from Hackett’s wedding style platform, The Stag
A suit to travel In
Blurring the gender lines

Market Size and Forecast

Key points
Menswear grows by 4.5% in 2014
Figure 18: Best and worst case forecast of UK sales of men’s outerwear, 2009-19
Menswear to grow by 22% by 2019
Figure 19: UK sales of men’s outerwear and current prices, 2009-19
Factors used in the forecast

Space Allocation Summary

Key points
Formal-casual split
Figure 20: Retailers of menswear: Formal – Casual space allocation, October 2014
Space allocations: Detailed estimates
Figure 21: Broad range clothing retailers, detailed space allocations for menswear, October 2014
Figure 22: Broad range clothing retailers and supermarket chains, detailed space allocations for menswear, October 2014
Figure 23: Menswear specialists, detailers space allocation estimates, October 2014
Estimated sales breakdown
Figure 24: Leading clothing retailers, estimated sales by product, 2014
Sales densities
Figure 25: Leading clothing retailers, estimated sales densities by product, 2014
Market shares
Figure 26: Leading clothing retailers, estimated market shares for menswear, 2014

Brand Research – Menswear

What you need to know
Brand map
Figure 27: Attitudes towards and usage of selected brands, January 2015 and November 2014
Key brand metrics
Figure 28: Key metrics for selected brands, January 2015 and November 2014
Brand attitudes: Primark is strongly defined by value
Figure 29: Attitudes, by brand, January 2015 and November 2014
Brand personality: Ted Baker has an exclusive image
Figure 30: Brand personality – Macro image, January 2015 and November 2014
Primark’s image of value results in stronger perception of being basic
Figure 31: Brand personality – Micro image, January 2015 and November 2014
Brand analysis
Zara has more in common with higher end brands than other fast fashion retailers
Figure 32: User profile of Zara, January 2015
Next benefits from a strong all-round image
Figure 33: User profile of Next, January 2015
Primark has a strong value element driving usage
Figure 34: User profile of Primark, January 2015
Marks & Spencer continues to score highly for trust among men
Figure 35: User profile of Marks & Spencer, November 2014
Ted Baker is considered exclusive and stylish but expense puts some off
Figure 36: User profile of Ted Baker, January 2015
Fat Face shows signs of growth among older age groups
Figure 37: User profile of Fat Face, January 2015
New Look can capitalise on awareness to create viable option for men
Figure 38: User profile of New Look, January 2015
Debenhams has fashion focus but is most likely to be seen as boring or tired
Figure 39: User profile of Debenhams, November 2014
Brand headline
Figure 40: User profile of White Stuff, January 2015
Topshop/Topman scores highly among narrow group of young men
Figure 41: User profile of Topshop/Topman, January 2015

The Consumer – Men’s Spending Priorities

Key points
Men buy clothes, but also add to savings
Figure 42: Activities men have done in the last three months, January 2014 and 2015
Gender gap between purchasing of clothes narrows
Figure 43: Spending habits for clothing, footwear and accessories, by gender, December 2014

The Consumer – Male Clothes Sizes

Key points
What we asked
Over one fifth of men wear plus-sizes
Figure 44: Men’s UK clothing size/waist sizes, January 2015
Older men wear bigger clothes sizes
Figure 45: Profile of men who wear clothes in plus-sizes, by age group, January 2015
Medium is the most popular clothes size

The Consumer – Where Do Men Buy Clothes?

Key points
What we asked
Primark leads
Figure 46: Retailers from where men bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months, split by in-store and online, January 2015
Figure 47: Profile of men who have bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months from Primark, M&S and Next, in-store and online, January 2015
Next draws mainly male under-35s
M&S remains popular among older men
Fewer men buy clothes
Amazon is fourth for menswear
Figure 48: Retailers from where men bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months, in-store and online, January 2015
Online shoppers
Young fashion retailers
Figure 49: Men who have bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months from Topman, H&M, higher other mid-market high street retailers and New Look, in-store or online, by age group, January 2015
Higher priced fashion stores
Tesco loses male customers
Figure 50: Men who have bought clothing for themselves in the last 12 months from Asda, Tesco and Sainsbury’s, in-store and online, January 2015
Department stores
Men shop at one or two retailers
Figure 51: Repertoire of in-store retailers from where men have bought clothes in the last 12 months, January 2015

The Consumer – Changes in Purchasing Behaviour

Key points
What we asked
Men spend the same, while women cut back
Figure 52: Changes in shopping behaviour for number of items of clothing bought and amount spent in the last 12 months, January 2015
Young men spend more on clothes
45-54s cut back the most
Figure 53: Changes in shopping behaviour for amount spent in the last 12 months, by age group, January 2015
25-44s spend the same as last year

The Consumer – Shopping Behaviour

Key points
What we asked
Figure 54: Male shopping behaviour when buying clothes in-store or online, January 2015
One in three men buy clothes on sale
London is new centre of men’s fashion
25-34s cut back on branded clothes
Rising trend for sporty fashion
Issues with sizing and fit
Rates of returns peak among young men
Use of mobile devices for shopping

The Consumer – Attitudes towards Innovations

Key points
What we asked
Smart fitting rooms pique male interest
Figure 55: Men’s attitudes to innovations when shopping for clothes in-store and online, January 2015
Using e-sizing technology to reduce returns
Using mobile devices to shop in-store
Men more drawn to personalisation than women
Using mobile payment technology
Style advice

Appendix – Market Size and Forecast

Figure 56: Best and worst forecast of UK sales of men's outerwear, 2014-19

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