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Marketing to Mums - China - November 2013

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Nov 2013

Category :

Advertising and Marketing

No. of Pages : 172 Pages


Chinese mums are becoming more demanding in what they want to achieve as well as savvier in how they achieve these goals. This has profound implications and opportunities for brands marketing to mums.
Table of Content

Introduction
Definition
Report structure
Methodology
Abbreviations

Executive Summary
The mum population
Figure 1: Population projection of women aged 20-49, Total and urban China, 2006-21
Two important demographic changes are taking place
Figure 2: Mums in China, by age demographics, 2013 vs. 2018
Uniqueness of Chinese mums
The consumer
Mums’ top concerns reflect the importance of family over self
Figure 3: Mums’ top concerns, July 2013
Mums place importance on quality but are also spending in a savvier way
Figure 4: Changes in shopping habits, July 2013
Spending on children’s education, premium food and drinks rise the most while that on personal luxury items falls
Figure 5: Changes in spending allocation, July 2013
Friends and professionals are a greater influence on mums than parents, with online also taking over from traditional media
Figure 6: Influencing persons and channels, July 2013
Health, fashion and beauty, and entertainment shows still garner strongest interest
Figure 7: Programmes watched most often, July 2013
Key issue: Attitudinal differences across Chinese mums
Figure 8: Typologies of mums, July 2013
Key issue: Capitalising on online opportunities in marketing and selling to mums
Figure 9: Market size of online retailing in China, total and mother and baby products, 2010-12
Figure 10: Consumer online shopping habits, by respondents with children and without children, February 2013
Key issue: Catering to mums’ top concern over child education
Key issue: Marketing to today’s working mums
What we think

An Overview of Mums in China
Key points
Mums by the number
Figure 11: Population of mums in China, 2013
Mum population: shrinking in total in China, rising in urban areas
Figure 12: Birth rate in China, 1979-2011
Figure 13: Fertility rate in China, 2003 vs. 2011
Figure 14: Population projection of women aged 20-49, Total and urban China, 2006-21
Changing demographics of Chinese mums
Postponed child birth leads to older first-time mums
Figure 15: Fertility rates for first born child in China, 2011 vs. 2003
Figure 16: Average marriage age in China, 2000 vs. 2010
In five years’ time, over half of mums will be the 80s and 90s generation
Figure 17: Mums in China, by age demographics, 2013 vs. 2018
Figure 18: Mums’ attitudes towards appearance and social activities, by age, July 2013
What makes Chinese mums different?
Being a working mum is the norm in tier one to three cities, driven by mums’ desire to provide better care for children and maintain their independence
Figure 19: Working status of mums, by age of children, July 2013
A strong controller of family finances
Figure 20: Control of finances, July 2013
Figure 21: Mums’ concerns, July 2013

The Consumer – Mums’ Top Concerns
Key points
Mums’ top three concerns: child education, family health and financial wellbeing
Figure 22: Mums’ top concerns, July 2013
Child education stays on top from birth until reaching adulthood
Figure 23: Mums’ concerns over child education, by age of children, July 2013
Figure 24: Mums’ concern over child education, by income, July 2013
Figure 25: Financial impact of children’s education, April 2012
Differences in concerns by high vs. low income mums
Figure 26: Mums’ top concerns, by income, July 2013

The Consumer – Changes in Shopping and Spending
Key points
Spending for quality, but saving by making smart purchases
Figure 27: Changes in shopping habits, July 2013
Younger mums more attracted by places with child-friendly facilities and online shopping
Figure 28: Changes in shopping habits, by mums’ age, July 2013
Spending on children’s education, premium food and drinks rise the most, while spending on personal luxury items falls
Figure 29: Changes in spending allocation, July 2013
Mapping spending changes according to children’s age
Figure 30: Changes in spending allocation (% of mums doing activities more than a year ago), by children’s age, July 2013

The Consumer – Mums’ Purchase Influencers
Key points
Friends outweighs parents, online exceeds TV
Figure 31: Influencing persons and channels, July 2013
Mums with higher levels of income and education tend to leverage multichannel information
Figure 32: Influencing channels, by income, July 2013
Figure 33: Influencing persons, by income, July 2013
Figure 34: Influencing persons, by income, July 2013 (continued)
Mums most interested in health, fashion and beauty, and entertainment programmes
Figure 35: Programmes watched most often, July 2013
Figure 36: Programmes watched most often, ‘education news’ and ‘children’s programmes’, by mums age and children’s age, July 2013
Mums with higher levels of income and education watch more fashion and beauty as well as leisure and travel programmes
Figure 37: Programmes watched most often, by mums’ personal income and level of education, July 2013

Key Issue – Attitudinal Differences among Chinese Mums
Key points
Typologies of mums
Figure 38: Typologies of mums, China July 2013
Figure 39: Attitudes, by types of mums, July 2013
Pragmatic ambitious mums
What do they think?
Who are they?
How do they act?
Marketing implications
Mature under-control mums
What do they think?
Who are they?
How do they act?
Marketing implications
Dedicated anxious mums (23%)
What do they think?
Who are they?
How do they act?
Marketing implications
Self-indulgent mums (17%)
What do they think?
Who are they?
How do they act?
Marketing implications
What does it mean?

Key Issue – Capitalising on Online Opportunities when Marketing and Selling to Mums
Key points
Rapid growth of online retailing in China
Nearly all mums who are internet users have shopped online
Figure 40: Online shopping penetration among mums, by platforms, February 2013
Mother and baby sector grows faster than total online retailing
Figure 41: Market size of online retailing in China, total and mother and baby products, 2010-12
Online retailers make strategic investments in mother and baby sector through integration
Mums buy more than just mother and baby products online
Figure 42: Products bought via online channels in the last 12 months, by mums and not mums, February 2013
While price is a strong driver, other important factors are in play
Nearly 60% of mums shop online for ideas and inspirations
Figure 43: Consumer online shopping habits, by age of mums, February 2013
Figure 44: Carrefour’s French cuisine and food online advertising, China 2013
Younger middle-class mums engage in Hai Tao to buy directly from overseas via online
Figure 45: Chinese mums showing their Hai Tao purchases at online forums, China, 2013
Innovations in online marketing to mums
Offer mums the social aspects of their online shopping experience
Figure 46: Mums’ social network activities conducted in the past three months, by age of mums, February 2013
Figure 47: US social shopping website ‘The Prowl’, 2013
Turning community-type mother and baby websites’ membership asset into more revenue opportunities
Figure 48: Baby Box gift box from babytree.com, China, 2013
Figure 49: Babytree launched in home early education product Mika World in China, 2011
Figure 50: Babytree launches B-Smart Watch for mums and mums-to-be in China, 2013
What does it mean?

Key Issue – Catering to Mums’ Top Concern over Children’s Education
Key points
Child education is the number one priority in mums’ lives
More mothers nowadays find child education means more than academic excellence
However, they are still pressured to keep up with others and play ‘tiger mums’
What can brands do?
Mums need knowledge, empathy and confidence
Figure 51: Attitudes towards being a parent and child raising skills, by different types of mums, July 3013
Figure 52: TV show Dad, Where are We Going? gains huge popularity in China, 2013
Building a brand’s core value on children’s learning and development
Figure 53: Omo ‘let’s play, China’ advertising, 2013
Leverage offline brand interaction with socially responsible PR campaigns
Figure 54: P&G’s Duracell launches ‘toy share’ campaign in China, 2013
Figure 55: BMW’s Children’s Traffic Safety Training Camp in China, 2013
Retailers can attract family visitors by offering a child-oriented in-store experience
Figure 56: Shanghai’s Kerry Parkside organized party at the groovy haunt Halloween party, 2013
Figure 57: Shanghai’s K11 shopping mall creates unique in-store experience with mini-urban farm, 2013
What does it mean?

Key Issue – Marketing to Today’s Working Mums
Key points
Striking a balance between family and career
Not all mums take the same approach
Figure 58: Attitudes towards balancing work and family, by types of mums, July 2013
Marketing opportunities: quality time is more important
Product opportunities: bringing convenience, efficiency and all-in-one solutions
Figure 59: New product launches in household care in China with convenience related claims, 2008-13
Figure 60: Mr Muscle toilet cleaning gel, China, 2011
Figure 61: Quaker oatmeal product offers more choices and quick cooking tips, China, 2013
Helping mums to get back on-track in their career
Figure 62: Mums’ top concerns ‘furthering my career’, by city, July 2013
The change from the ‘yellow-faced wife’ to the pursuit of being a ‘hot mum’
Wide consensus that women should look attractive even after having a child
Figure 63: Popular TV show Hot Mum, China, 2013
Figure 64: Attitudes towards self-appearance, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 65: Clarins’ maternity care gift set and mother-to-be spa treatment, UK, 2013
Figure 66: Philips facial sauna and hair styler for in-home usage, China, 2013
A new way of connecting to mums by redefining happiness
Strong desire to receive others’ compliments on appearance suggests mums need the ‘feel good factor’
Figure 67: Attitudes towards self-appearance, by types of mums, July 2013
Mums’ happiness – starting to be redefined from self-happiness first
Figure 68: Attitudes towards personal needs and satisfaction, by types of mums, July 2013
What does it mean?

Appendix – Age Structure of Chinese Women
Figure 69: Age structure of Chinese female population, 2006-21

Appendix – Incidence of Mum and Age of Children
Figure 70: Number of children, July 2013
Figure 71: Number of children, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 72: Age of children, July 2013
Figure 73: Age of children, by demographics, July 2013

Appendix – Financials
Figure 74: Working status, July 2013
Figure 75: Working status, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 76: Working status, by demographics, July 2013 (continued)
Figure 77: Working status, by age of children, July 2013
Figure 78: Control of financse, July 2013
Figure 79: Control of finances, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 80: Control of finances, by working status, July 2013

Appendix – Concerns
Figure 81: Mum’s concerns, July 2013
Figure 82: Mum’s concerns, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 83: Mum’s concerns, by demographics, July 2013 (continued)
Figure 84: Mum’s concerns, by age of children, July 2013

Appendix – Behaviours
Figure 85: Shopping behaviours, July 2013
Figure 86: Shopping behaviours, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 87: Shopping behaviours, by demographics, July 2013 (continued)
Figure 88: Shopping behaviours, by age of children, July 2013
Figure 89: Spending behaviours, July 2013
Figure 90: Spending behaviours – Buy premium food and drinks, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 91: Spending behaviours – Buy premium personal care products, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 92: Spending behaviours – Buy premium household care products, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 93: Spending behaviours – Purchase clothes for my family, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 94: Spending behaviours – Provide educational/learning activities for children, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 95: Spending behaviours – Have holidays with my family, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 96: Spending behaviours – Purchase jewellery/personal luxury items, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 97: Spending behaviours – Dine out with my family, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 98: Spending behaviours – Purchase electronics, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 99: Spending behaviours – Entertainment activities, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 100: Spending behaviours – Go on day trips with my family, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 101: Spending behaviours, by age of children, July 2013
Figure 102: Spending behaviours, by control of finance, July 2013

Appendix – Influence
Figure 103: Influencing persons, July 2013
Figure 104: Influencing persons, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 105: Influencing persons, by demographics, July 2013 (continued)
Figure 106: Influencing persons, by age of children, July 2013
Figure 107: Influencing persons, by control of finances, July 2013
Figure 108: Influencing channel, July 2013
Figure 109: Influencing channel, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 110: Influencing channel, by demographics, July 2013 (continued)
Figure 111: Other influencing channel, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 112: Influencing channel, by age of children, July 2013

Appendix – Attitudinal Statements
Figure 113: Types of mums, July 2013
Figure 114: Agreement with the statement ‘It is difficult for me to find time to think about my appearance since becoming a mother’, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 115: Agreement with the statement ‘My own needs usually take second place after my child(ren)’s’, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 116: Agreement with the statement ‘I feel more satisfied about buying things for my family than for myself’, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 117: Agreement with the statement ‘It’s hard to balance looking after my children with other areas of my life’, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 118: Agreement with the statement ‘I am willing to pay extra for products or services that make my life easier’, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 119: Agreement with the statement ‘I prefer to take care of my children myself rather than giving these responsibilities to another person’, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 120: Agreement with the statement ‘It is still important for a woman to look attractive even after having a child’, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 121: Agreement with the statement ‘It is still important to be socially active in various activities after having a child’, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 122: Agreement with the statement ‘I feel good about receiving compliments from others about my personal appearance or my child’s appearance’, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 123: Agreement with the statement ‘I feel it is difficult being a parent’, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 124: Agreement with the statement ‘I want to learn more about bringing up children so I can improve my child rising skills’, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 125: Agreement with the statement ‘Recommendations and experience from others about parenting are important to me.’, by demographics, July 2013

Appendix – Further Analysis
Figure 126: Target groups, July 2013
Figure 127: Target groups, by demographics, July 2013
Figure 128: Age of children, by target groups, July 2013
Figure 129: Working status, by target groups, July 2013
Figure 130: Control of finances, by target groups, July 2013
Figure 131: Mum’s concerns, by target groups, July 2013
Figure 132: Shopping behaviours, by target groups, July 2013
Figure 133: Spending behaviours, by target groups, July 2013
Figure 134: Influencing persons, by target groups, July 2013
Figure 135: Influencing channel, by target groups, July 2013

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