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Knowledge Management (KM) in Financial Services

Timetric
Published Date » 2012-10-04
No. Of Pages » 69

Synopsis
  • This report presents some of the key concepts and practices that demonstrate the variety of ways that Knowledge Management can be applied in the financial services industry
  • It provides detailed case studies regarding the role of the knowledge management process in the success of many organizations such as Wells Fargo Bank and Bank of New York Mellon

Summary

Blending and using the companys internal and external information and transforming it into actionable knowledge through technology is called KM. Knowledge can be either internal or external but the problem lies in capturing and managing it for the organizations improvement. Information is scattered throughout an organization and it can be in the form of Microsoft Word or PDF documents, in hard copies and in the minds of employees. Some of the most sophisticated KM strategies and practices have emerged in the insurance and reinsurance industries. Much of KM revolves around creating a learning environment, where smooth transversal of knowledge is the key to enhancing employee skills and sharing knowledge between individuals and groups. Customer relationship management (CRM) and data mining (DM) are dominant practices in the financial services industry. One of the primary roles of KM in companies globally is to help them improve the understanding of their resources, to determine where further investments should be placed to maximize the value of their intangible assets, and to learn how best to manage these resources for the future.

Scope
  • This report provides notable examples of knowledge management practices worldwide, reflecting advanced thinking and practice in an area
  • It details the application of KM to develop a customer relationship-based strategy on the retail banking side 
  • This report provides challenges associated with the knowledge discovery process
  • This report helps to understand, how organizations are using knowledge management process to beat the competition

Reasons To Buy

  • This report examines detailed insight into knowledge management practices 
  • This report discusses in detail, the various analytical components of the total cost of ownership (TCO) framework such as, direct costs and indirect costs
  • It explains the key concepts to apply Knowledge Management practices in the financial services industry
  • It discusses various case studies from different countries regarding the role of the knowledge management process
  • It helps to understand ways to capitalize on discovering knowledge before peer competitors 

Key Highlights
  • With the help of knowledge management, knowledge loss can be prevented when an employee exits an organization.
  • Some of the most sophisticated knowledge management strategies and practices have emerged in the insurance and reinsurance industries.
  • Knowledge management helps organizations to identify their resources, to determine where further investments should be placed to maximize the value of their intangible assets, and to learn how best to manage these resources for the future.
Table of Content

1 Executive Summary

2 Introduction

2.1 Why do Bankers Care About KM?
2.2 Objectives of the Report
2.3 Overview of KM
2.3.1 The knowledge economy
2.3.2 The knowledge corporation
2.4 The Emergence of KM
2.4.1 The knowledge view
2.4.2 What is knowledge?
2.4.3 What then is KM?
2.4.4 Knowledge product strategy
2.4.5 IP strategy
2.4.6 Knowledge work strategy
2.5 Common KM Practices
2.6 Some Classic Examples of KM
2.6.1 Hughes Space and Communications
2.6.2 Dow Chemical
2.6.3 CIBC

3 Streaming Knowledge Discovery through Advanced System Integration
3.1 Knowledge Discovery
3.2 The Traditional Knowledge Discovery Process
3.2.1 Problems with the traditional knowledge discovery process
3.3 The Automated Knowledge Discovery Process
3.3.1 Project objectives and implementation characteristics
3.4 The Expected Benefits of Automated Knowledge Discovery at Bank of Montreal

4 Building the Global Corporate University
4.1 What is a Corporate University?
4.2 Building a Corporate University
4.3 The Governing Body
4.4 The Vision
4.4.1 The new learning model
4.5 Creating a Corporate Identity
4.5.1 Attracting and retaining the best people
4.5.2 Capitalizing on synergies
4.5.3 Improving cost-effectiveness
4.5.4 Promoting corporate culture and identity
4.5.5 Creating an effective learning architecture
4.5.6 Promoting self-directed development
4.6 The Scope of DBU
4.7 Cross-divisional T&D
4.8 School of Leadership
4.8.1 School of IT Training
4.8.2 School of Personal Effectiveness
4.8.3 The School of Finance and Commerce
4.8.4 Learning and knowledge services
4.8.5 DBU operations
4.8.6 The funding strategy
4.8.7 Developing products and services
4.8.8 Selecting learning partners
4.8.9 Devising a measurement system

5 Keys to Building Knowledge into the Customer Relationship Equation
5.1 Back to Basics
5.2 Revising the CRM Strategy
5.3 Turning Information into Knowledge
5.4 Proving the Relationship between KM and the Bottom-line
5.5 Organizational Cross-cultures
5.5.2 Cultural change from a product to customer focus
5.6 Assigning Customer Relationships through Statistical Modeling

6 Human Capital Development
6.1 Human Capital Growth
6.2 The Competency Planning Strategy at SEB
6.3 The Competency Planning Model at SEB
6.3.1 The analysis phase
6.3.2 The action phase
6.3.3 The follow-up phase
6.4 Competency Planning Team
6.5 The Future of Competency Development at SEB
6.5.1 IT infrastructure
6.5.2 Mixed learning strategies

7 Knowledge Sharing at the World Bank
7.1 The Knowledge-sharing Strategy
7.2 CoPs
7.3 The Development Forum
7.4 The IT Enabler
7.5 Knowledge-sharing as Cultural Change
7.6 The Road to Change
7.6.1 Human development at the bank
7.6.2 Consulting the community
7.6.3 Putting collaboration first
7.6.4 Measuring knowledge-sharing
7.7 The Future Direction of the World Bank in Economic Development

8 Total Cost of Ownership
8.1 Hidden Information Means Hidden Costs
8.2 What is Total Cost of Ownership?
8.2.1 Direct (budgeted) costs
8.2.2 Indirect (unbudgeted) costs
8.2.3 Economic benefits
8.2.4 Business benefits
8.3 The TCO Objective
8.4 TCO as KM
8.4.1 TCO analysis
8.5 Lessons Learnt to Date
8.5.1 Integration of disparate data sources
8.5.2 Reporting
8.5.3 Data quality
8.5.4 Next steps

9 The IT Imperative in KM
9.1 About the KM Group
9.1.1 Knowledge-sharing through CoPs
9.1.2 Defining a CoP
9.1.3 CoPs in action
9.1.4 Disability and web accessibility
9.1.5 E-learning
9.1.6 Best practices
9.2 Getting Communities of Practice off the Ground

10 New Age Learning
10.1 The Primary Components of Corporate Knowledge
10.2 St Paul University
10.2.1 The Edge
10.2.2 The knowledge exchange
10.3 Cultural Change and Organizational Learning
10.4 The Future of New Age Learning at the St Paul Company
10.4.1 Build bridges not territories
10.4.2 Buy rather than build
10.4.3 People differ in their rate of adoption
10.4.4 Promote continuously
10.4.5 Be optimistic great things can happen

11 Setting Standards for Intellectual Capital Management and Reporting
11.1 Intellectual Capital (IC)
11.2 KM and Measurement at Skandia
11.2.1 The IC Reporting Model
11.2.2 Skandias IC components
11.2.3 The Navigator Approach
11.3 The Navigator Approach Applied in American Skandia

12 Organizational Learning Becoming a Customer-Centric Organization

13 Process Improvement
13.1 The Bank of New York Mellon
13.2 Centralized Process Improvement
13.3 The KM Challenge
13.4 The Best Practice Model
13.4.1 Certification
13.5 CMM Roll-out
13.5.1 T&D for best practices
13.5.2 Supporting tools
13.5.3 Culture
13.6 Results of Process Improvement
13.6.1 Project delivery benefits
13.6.2 Non-project delivery benefits

14 Conclusion

List of Tables


Table 1: Characteristics of Mature and Immature Software Organizations

List of Figures


Figure 1: Share of Total Direct Costs (%)
Figure 2: Skandias IC Reporting Model
Figure 3: The Navigator Approach
Figure 4: Navigator Measures for Customer Service

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