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Healthy Dining Trends - US - March 2017

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Apr 2017

Category :

Beverages

No. of Pages : N/A

Health is becoming less of a section on a menu and is gradually becoming an overarching lifestyle experience at restaurants. As restaurants continue to use claims focused on real, natural food the overall health message is becoming less about what you can’t have, and instead is focused on creating a craving for what’s in front of you. However, healthy dining is not without its challenges, and restaurants still face competition from the home kitchen where consumers feel more in control of what goes into their meal.

Table of Content

OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Consumers value the at-home kitchen for health
Figure 1: Healthy dining attitudes, any rank, by gender, December 2016
Millennial health trends are not cut and dry
Figure 2: Healthy dining attitude, “I eat healthy when I can, but don’t make it a priority,” any rank, by urban and suburban Millennials, December 2016
Health gets personal with the rise of wearable technology
Figure 3: Ownership and intent to purchase wearable tech, September 2016
The opportunities
The menu is a blank canvas for inspiration
Figure 4: Growth of ingredient claims on the menu, Q4 2015-Q4 2016
Healthy food loses the bad rap it once had
Figure 5: Healthy dining statement agreement “Healthy food can taste delicious,” by gender, December 2016
Younger consumers have a curiosity for health
Figure 6: Healthy dining statement agreement, by age, December 2016
What it means

THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Wearable technology keeps health at your fingertips
Calorie regulations get real
The body positive movement

MARKET PERSPECTIVE
Healthy claims collide in retail and foodservice
Figure 7: Avoiding in better-for-you foods, June 2016
Health is no longer a one lane approach, but a cross-segment approach

MARKET FACTORS
The digital health movement
Figure 8: Ownership and intent to purchase wearable tech, September 2016
The body positive movement and obesity rates
Figure 9: Percent of people aged 20 and older who are overweight or obese, 2001-02, 2013-14
Calorie regulations become a new reality for restaurants

KEY TRENDS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Health without limits
A chic view of health
Kombucha exposes consumers to new flavor palates

WHAT’S WORKING?
Vegetables on every plate
Health: a restaurant theme
Kombucha goes mainstream

WHAT’S STRUGGLING?
Health without a purpose

WHAT’S NEXT?
Virtual Health Restaurants
Plant-Based Proteins

MMI DATA
Diet-based menu claims on the rise
Figure 10: Growth of menu item claims, Q4 2015-Q4 2016
Figure 11: Growth of menu item claims, Q4 2015-Q4 2016
Ingredient claims get granular
Figure 12: Growth of ingredient claims, Q4 2015-Q4 2016
The healthy and indulgent divide
Figure 13: Growth of ingredient preparation methods, fried and grilled, Q4 2015-Q4 2016

THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
All-natural leads in consumer health claims
Tea leads in healthy beverage interest
A majority of consumers believe healthy food can taste delicious

WHERE CONSUMERS ARE DINING
Fast food remains a leader in overall visitation
Figure 14: Restaurant visitation, December 2016
Men dine out more frequently than women
Figure 15: Restaurant visitation, by gender, December 2016
Higher-income consumers driving fast casual visitation
Figure 16: Restaurant visitation, by income, December 2016
Black consumers are not a strong demographic for fast casual restaurants
Figure 17: Restaurant visitation, by race and hispanic origin, December 2016

RESTAURANT CLAIMS BY VISITATION
Can bacon be healthy?
Figure 18: Health claims, by restaurant segment visitation, December 2016
Smoothie shops are pushing health trends forward
Figure 19: Health claims, by smoothie/juice bar visitation, December 2016

HEALTHY DINING CLAIMS
Keep it simple
Figure 20: Repertoire of healthy claim drivers, December 2016
The superfood claim loses relevancy to all-natural
Figure 21: Health claims, December 2016
Men prefer direct health claims
Figure 22: Health claims, by gender, December 2016
Sugar-free divides generations
Figure 23: Health claims, by generation, December 2016
Hispanics value transparency
Figure 24: Health claims, by generation, December 2016

HEALTH VERSUS INDULGENCE
A dividing line between health and indulgence
Figure 25: Healthy menu associations versus indulgent menu associations, December 2016
Men are less health conscious than women
Figure 26: Healthy menu associations, by gender, December 2016
Millennials and iGens have different health expectations
Figure 27: Any healthy menu associations, by generation, December 2016
Figure 28: Any healthy menu associations, by generation, December 2016

HEALTHY DINING ATTITUDES
Healthy food can taste good
Figure 29: Healthy dining statement agreement, December 2016
Hispanics value healthy beverage options
Figure 30: Healthy dining statement agreement, by Hispanics and Non-Hispanics, December 2016
The toast trend
Figure 31: Healthy dining statement agreement “Healthy food can taste delicious,” by gender, December 2016
A curiosity for health
Figure 32: Healthy dining statement agreement, by age, December 2016
Urban Millennials drive health trends
Figure 33: Healthy dining statement agreement, by urban and suburban Millennials, December 2016
Redefining the kids’ menu
Figure 34: Healthy dining statement agreement, “I like when restaurants offer healthy items on kids’ menus,” by mothers and fathers, December 2016

HEALTHY BEVERAGE INTEREST
Tea leads in health preferences
Figure 35: Healthy beverage interest, December 2016
iGens showcase an interest in beverage diversity
Figure 36: Healthy beverage interest, by generation, December 2016
Women are more likely to experiment with different beverages
Figure 37: Healthy beverage interest, by gender, December 2016
Kombucha interest driven by health-focused consumers
Figure 38: Interest in kombucha, by restaurant segment visitation, December 2016

HEALTHY DINING BEHAVIOR
Consumers correlate healthy eating with cooking at home
Figure 39: Healthy dining attitudes, any rank, December 2016
Women cook at home more often than men
Figure 40: Healthy dining attitudes, any rank, by gender, December 2016
Asian consumers demonstrate the strongest interest in a healthy lifestyle
Figure 41: Healthy dining attitudes, any rank, by race and Hispanic origin, December 2016
Millennial dining habits expose them to healthier options
Figure 42: Healthy dining attitudes, any rank, by iGens and Millennials, December 2016
Figure 43: Healthy dining attitude, “I cook at home when I want to eat healthy,” any rank, by urban and suburban Millennials, December 2016
Figure 44: Healthy dining attitude, “I eat healthy when I can, but don’t make it a priority,” any rank, by urban and suburban Millennials, December 2016
Income plays a role in accessibility of healthy options
Figure 45: Healthy dining attitudes, any rank, by income, December 2016

CHAID ANALYSIS
Parents seek health convenience
Figure 46: Healthy dining statement agreement – CHAID – Tree output, December 2016

APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
Consumer survey data
Consumer qualitative research
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations

APPENDIX – CHAID ANALYSIS
Methodology
Figure 47: Healthy dining statement agreement – CHAID – Table output, December 2016

APPENDIX–CONSUMER
Figure 48: Population by Hispanic origin and generation, 2017

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