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Consumers and Financial Advice - UK - April 2014

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Apr 2014

Category :

Banking

No. of Pages : 160 Pages

The advice gap presents an opportunity for the financial advice industry. Firms that are able to innovate and offer low cost solutions will prosper in future, while those who do not address this part of the market will forfeit share to online competitors.
Table of Content

Introduction

Note on definitions
Note on consumer research
Abbreviations

Executive Summary

The financial advice market
Numbers of financial advisers continue to increase post-RDR
Figure 1: Number of advisers, by sub-type, December 2012, July 2013 and January 2014
The RDR – More phases are implemented
Economic and demographic context
A lack of disposable income makes it difficult for consumers to save
The consumer
Consumers use banks for advice more regularly than financial advisers
Figure 2: Types of financial advice used, January 2014
Referrals and recommendations are still a popular way for consumers to find an adviser
Figure 3: Methods for finding financial advice, January 2014
Face-to-face remains the most popular way to receive financial advice
Figure 4: Accessing financial advice, January 2014
The cost of advice is still a concern for consumers
Figure 5: Attitudes towards financial advice, January 2014
The majority of consumers would prefer ad hoc advice
More consumers would prefer to make their own decisions rather than rely on professional advice
Figure 6: Attitudes towards managing finances, January 2014
What we think

Issues and Insights

Online tools can make financial advice affordable for younger consumers
The facts
The implications
Flexibility is the key to attracting wealthier consumers
The facts
The implications
Banks and building societies still have the perfect platform for offering mass-market advice
The facts
The implications
Advice through money advice or employers can give consumers greater confidence
The facts
The implications

Trend Application

Keep it local
DIY administration for cheaper financial advice
Mintel Futures: Generation Next

Regulatory Context

Key points
The RDR – More phases are implemented
Capital adequacy rules to be delayed until 2017
First thematic review on how firms are implementing the RDR
Second thematic review on delivering independent advice
Non-advised and simplified advice
RDR has not reduced the financial adviser population
Figure 7: Number of advisers, by sub-type, December 2012, July 2013 and January 2014
Mortgages
MMR comes into force banning most non-advised sales
The 2014 Budget proposes to ‘guarantee guidance’ for consumers at retirement
European regulation
MiFID II could challenge the rules of the RDR
rules on PRIPs could also conflict with the RDR

Economic Context

Key points
A lack of disposable income makes it difficult for consumers to save
Figure 8: Increases in the cost of living and the growth in average wages, January 2008-February 2014
Economic improvement begins to pull down the savings ratio
Figure 9: Quarterly change in UK GDP and Household savings ratio, Q1 2004-Q4 2013
Low interest rates continue to undermine appeal of cash savings
Figure 10: Official bank base rate and three-month LIBOR, January 2007-February 2014
FTSE continued to edge higher in 2013
Figure 11: FTSE 100 and FTSE All-share – Daily index movements, January 2008-March 2014

Consumer Sentiment

Key points
Consumer confidence increased sharply in 2013
Figure 12: UK consumer confidence index, January 1989-December 2013
Consumers’ finances are slowly improving…
Figure 13: Trends in consumer financial situation, June 2009-January 2014
yet 29% feel that their financial position is worse than last year
Figure 14: Trend in financial situation compared to a year ago, July 2011-February 2014
Consumers are more optimistic about the future
Figure 15: Trend in consumer sentiment for the coming year, June 2009-December 2013

Value of Savings and Investments

Key points
Overall, consumers have low levels of savings and investments
Figure 16: Value of savings and investments, January 2014
Financial advisers target affluent consumers
Figure 17: Wealth of advised clients, August 2013
Older consumers are more likely to be seeking financial advice
Figure 18: Value of savings and investments, by age, January 2014

Expected Demand for Financial Advice by Product

Key points
The majority of consumers expect to receive advice on a financial product in the future
Figure 19: Expected demand for financial advice by product, January 2014
Younger consumers are more likely to expect to receive advice in the future
Figure 20: Expected demand for financial advice by product, by age, January 2014
Over 55s underestimate their need for pension advice
Wealthier consumers are more likely expect to receive advice on savings and investments
Figure 21: Expected demand for financial advice by product, by value of savings and investments, January 2014
There is potential for cross-selling of services across the advice industry
Figure 22: Expected demand for financial advice by product, by expected demand for financial advice by product, January 2014

Types of Advice Used

Key points
Bank and building societies top list of most used professional source of advice
Figure 23: Types of advice used, January 2014
Financial advisers are more likely to be used by wealthier consumers
Friends and family hold sway with younger consumers
Online channels of advice are widely used to inform financial decisions
People want to learn from the experiences of others
Money Advice Service is yet to attract widespread use as a channel of advice
Employers also remain a niche source of advice
Wealthier consumers are more likely to have used a financial adviser
Figure 24: Value of savings and investments, by types of advice used, January 2014

Expected Sources of Advice

Key points
Half of consumers expect to receive some form of online financial advice in the future
Figure 25: Expected sources of advice, January 2014
The Money Advice Service has the potential to increase its usage
Expected use of online sources of advice is even across age groups
Figure 26: Expected sources of advice, by age, January 2014
Low income groups are unlikely to expect to use financial advisers in the future
Figure 27: Expected sources of advice, by current financial situation and gross annual income, January 2014
People who expect to use a financial adviser are more likely to do so as the first port of call
Figure 28: Expected sources of advice, January 2014

Methods of Finding Professional Financial Advice

Key points
High street presence remains the most popular way to find financial advice
Figure 29: Methods of finding financial advice, January 2014
Word of mouth is still a popular way for consumers to find an adviser
Online methods of finding an adviser are becoming more important
A small proportion of over 65s found their adviser online
Figure 30: Methods of finding financial advice, by age, January 2014
Financial advisers are more likely to attract people through referrals and recommendations
Figure 31: Methods of searching for financial advice, by types of advice used, January 2014

Accessing Financial Advice

Key points
Face-to-face remains the most popular way to receive financial advice
Figure 32: Accessing financial advice, January 2014
Only 8% of consumers would rule out receiving advice from a bank or building society
Younger consumers are more open to receiving advice online
Figure 33: Accessing financial advice, by age, January 2014
Online reviews are more persuasive for younger consumers
Wealthier investors are more likely to prefer local advice firms and home visits
Figure 34: Accessing financial advice, by value of savings and investments, January 2014
The desire for face-to-face advice is a universal amongst consumers

Attitudes Towards Financial Advice

Key points
The majority of consumers would prefer ad hoc advice
Figure 35: Attitudes towards financial advice, January 2014
The cost of advice is still a concern for consumers
Younger consumers are more trusting of financial advisers
Figure 36: Attitudes towards financial advice, by age, January 2014
The value of the ‘independent’ tag is likely to fade over time
Advised consumers are more likely to want an ‘independent’ adviser
Figure 37: Attitudes towards financial advice, by types of financial advice used, January 2014

Attitudes Towards Managing Finances

Key points
The majority of consumers to manage their finances independently
Figure 38: Attitudes towards managing finances, January 2014
The majority of consumers prefer to research first, before considering advice
More consumers would prefer to make their own decisions than rely on professional advice
Only 22% of consumers are not very confident in their ability to make financial decisions
Consumers are aware of the importance of planning and regular saving

Appendix – Value of Savings and Investments

Figure 39: Value of savings and investments, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 40: Value of savings and investments, by demographics, January 2014 (continued)
Figure 41: Expected demand for financial advice by product, by value of savings and investments, January 2014

Appendix – Expected Demand for Financial Advice by Product

Figure 42: Expected demand for financial advice by product, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 43: Expected demand for financial advice by product, by value of savings and investments, January 2014
Figure 44: Future demand for financial advice products, by future demand for financial advice products, January 2014

Appendix – Types of Advice Used

Figure 45: Most popular types of financial advice used, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 46: Next most popular types of financial advice used, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 47: Other types of financial advice used, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 48: Value of savings and investments, by types of advice used, January 2014
Figure 49: Value of savings and investments, by next most popular types of advice used, January 2014

Appendix – Expected Sources of Advice

Figure 50: Most popular expected sources of advice, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 51: Next most popular expected sources of advice, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 52: Other expected sources of advice, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 53: Expected sources of advice – All financial advice, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 54: Expected sources of advice – All online, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 55: Expected sources of advice – Financial adviser or financial planner, not based in a bank/building society, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 56: Expected sources of advice – Friends and/or family, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 57: Expected sources of advice – Adviser at a bank or building society, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 58: Expected sources of advice – Price comparison websites, by demographics, January 2014

Appendix – Methods of Finding Financial Advice

Figure 59: Most popular methods of finding financial advice, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 60: Next most popular methods of finding financial advice, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 61: Methods of searching for financial advice, by types of advice used, January 2014

Appendix – Accessing Financial Advice

Figure 62: Most popular accessing financial advice, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 63: Next most popular accessing financial advice, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 64: Accessing financial advice, by value of savings and investments, January 2014

Appendix – Attitudes Towards Financial Advice

Figure 65: Agreement with the statement ‘It is better to pay for financial advice if, and when it is needed, rather than on an ongoing basis’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 66: Agreement with the statement ‘I am concerned that I will not be able to afford the cost of professional financial advice’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 67: Agreement with the statement ‘I would only use a financial adviser that describes their services as ‘independent’’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 68: Agreement with the statement ‘Financial advisers can be trusted to act in their clients best interests’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 69: Agreement with the statement ‘It is better to use one advice company for all types of financial advice’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 70: Agreement with the statement ‘I expect a financial adviser to make decisions on my behalf’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 71: Attitudes towards financial advice, by types of financial advice used, January 2014
Figure 72: Attitudes towards financial advice, by types of financial advice used, January 2014 (continued)

Appendix – Attitudes Towards Managing Finances

Figure 73: Agreement with the statement ‘It is important to be generally aware of the balance in your current account’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 74: Agreement with the statement ‘I prefer to manage my own financial transactions when I can’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 75: Agreement with the statement ‘It is important to plan for your financial future’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 76: Agreement with the statement ‘It is better to research financial products yourself first, before considering financial advice’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 77: Agreement with the statement ‘It is important to save/invest regularly’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 78: Agreement with the statement ‘Making big financial decisions is daunting’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 79: Agreement with the statement ‘It is better to make your own financial decisions rather than rely on professional financial advice’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 80: Agreement with the statement ‘Managing my personal finances is complicated’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 81: Agreement with the statement ‘I am not very confident in my ability to make financial decisions’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 82: Agreement with the statement ‘It is pointless creating financial goals because I am unlikely to be able to achieve them’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 83: Agreement with the statement ‘I cannot be bothered to think about my long-term financial goals’, by demographics, January 2014
Figure 84: Agreement with the statement ‘There is no point saving/investing for the future’, by demographics, January 2014

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