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Consumer Attitudes toward Marketing Channels in Financial Services - US - August 2013

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Sep 2013

Category :

Banking

No. of Pages : 148 Pages


Changing demographics, changing technology, and consumers’ increasing demand to be able to access information whenever they want using whatever method they want are driving massive changes in the way financial services companies market their products and services. The most successful companies will be those that do the best job of staying abreast of or, even better, ahead of those changes.
TABLE OF CONTENT

Scope and Themes
What you need to know
Data sources
Sales data
Consumer survey data
Direct marketing creative
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations

Executive Summary
The market
Figure 1: Ownership of financial products, June 2013
Consumers not likely to purchase another product from current provider
Figure 2: Interest in ads and products from own primary financial provider, by type of provider, June 2013
Market drivers
Mobile channels increasing in importance as smartphone/tablet ownership increases
Figure 3: Incidence of smartphone ownership, November 2011 and June 2013
Figure 4: Incidence of tablet computer ownership, by age, February 2012 and June 2013
The consumer
Television is still the preferred channel
Figure 5: Financial Services marketing channels consumers are most likely to notice, June 2013
How consumers prefer to communicate with financial companies
Figure 6: Influence of direct mail/email on communication with financial company, by gender, June 2013
Figure 7: Interest in channels for communications from financial provider, by type of provider, June 2013
What we think

Issues and Insights
Getting people into the branch
Issues
Insights
Reaching young people
Issues
Insights
Taking advantage of all marketing channels
Issues
Insights
How does the growth of minority groups influence the use of marketing channels?
Issues
Insights

Trend Applications
Inspire trend: Open Diary
Inspire trend: Experience is All
Mintel futures: Access Anything, Anywhere

Market Size and Forecast
Key points
Newspapers
Figure 8: Aggregated newspaper website audience, November 2011-November 2012
Online readership increases
Figure 9: Top U.S. print media websites, by market share, June 2013
Social media use continues to grow
Facebook
Figure 10: Demographics of Facebook users, 2012
Figure 11: Number of global Facebook users, by region, April 2013
Twitter
Figure 12: Demographics of twitter users, 2012
Figure 13: Twitter ad revenues, worldwide, 2010-15
Figure 14: U.S. net Twitter digital ad revenues, by mobile vs. desktop, 2012-15
YouTube
Figure 15: Frequency of YouTube visits by U.S. internet users, March 2013

Market Drivers
Key points
Device ownership
Figure 16: Smartphone ownership, Nov 2011, June 2013
Figure 17: Tablet ownership, by age, Feb 2012, June 2013
Television watching is declining
Figure 18: Hours: minutes of television watched per week, by age, Q1 2011-Q1 2013
Minorities own electronic devices – and these groups are growing
Figure 19: Electronic device ownership, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2013
Figure 20: U.S. population growth, percent change, by race/ethnicity, 2015-55

Competitive Context
Key points
Newspapers are holding their own
Figure 21: Number and circulation of daily and Sunday newspapers, 2000-11
iPads taking ad dollars from print magazines
Figure 22: Ad pages/iPad ad unit growth, first half 2012, first half 2013

Segment Performance
Key points
Direct mail
Figure 23: Total volume of direct mail/advertising direct mail pieces delivered by USPS, 2003-12
Figure 24: Volume of advertising-based mail as percentage of total mail volume, 2003-12
Figure 25: Percentage who are likely to notice direct mail, by age, June 2013
Figure 26: Response rates by selected media, 2012
Figure 27: Incidence of response to direct mail/email from financial company, by gender, June 2013
Email
Figure 28: Interest in receiving information via different channels, by type of provider, June 2013
Television
Figure 29: Marketing channels most likely to be noticed, June 2013
Figure 30: DVR market penetration, July 2008-March 2012
Figure 31: DVR market penetration, by income, August 2011- March 2012
Figure 32: U.S. television ad spending, 2011-17
Radio
Figure 33: Air and digital radio spending, $billions, 2010-16
Online display advertising
Figure 34: Net U.S. digital display advertising revenues at major ad-selling companies, 2011-15
Figure 35: Net U.S. digital display ad revenue growth at major online companies, 2011-15
Biggest online display advertisers
Figure 36: 10 largest display ad advertisers, by impressions (MM), January-December 2012
Mobile advertising
Figure 37: Preferences for types of mobile ads, by age, January 2013
Figure 38: Awareness and use of mobile banking apps, April 2013

Innovations and Innovators
Key points
Scavenger hunts drive website traffic
Credit union finds use for Pinterest
Flo is a social media star

Marketing Strategies
Key points
Ad spending
Figure 39: Top 10 financial services companies’ total ad spending/internet ad spending, 2011-12
Digital ad spending continues to grow, but more slowly
Figure 40: U.S. financial services digital ad spending, 2011-17
Figure 41: Percent change/percent of total digital ad spend, financial services industry, 2011-16
Mobile advertising
Figure 42: Top five industries in U.S. mobile marketing spending, 2010-15
Figure 43: Growth in mobile spending, by format, 2011-16
Social media
Facebook
Figure 44: Top 10 U.S. banks, by Facebook “likes,” Q2 2013
Twitter
Figure 45: Top 10 U.S. banks, by number of Twitter followers, Q2 2013
Video
Figure 46: Interest in getting information from bank, credit union, or financial adviser via video, by age, June 2013
Figure 47: Watch financial services video on social media, by age, October 2012
Who is on YouTube?
Figure 48: Top 10 U.S. financial institutions, by number of YouTube views, Q2 2013
Overview of the brand landscape
Brand analysis: Bank of America
Online initiatives
Figure 49: Bank of America online ad, 2013
Figure 50: Bank of America online ad, 2013
TV presence
Television
Figure 51: Bank of America television ad, 2013
Figure 52: Bank of America television ad, 2013
Print and other
Direct mail
Figure 53: Bank of America direct mail ad, 2013
Email
Figure 54: Bank of America email ad, 2013
Figure 55: Bank of America email ad, 2013
Brand analysis: Progressive Insurance
Online initiatives
Figure 56: Progressive online ad, 2013
Figure 57: Progressive online ad, 2013
TV presence
Television
Figure 58: Progressive television ad, 2013
Figure 59: Progressive television ad, 2013
Print and other
Direct mail
Figure 60: Progressive direct mail ad, 2013
Figure 61: Progressive direct mail ad, 2013
Print
Figure 62: Progressive print ad, 2013
Figure 63: Progressive print ad, 2013
Email
Figure 64: Progressive email ad, 2013
Brand analysis: Visa
Online initiatives
Figure 65: Visa online ad, 2012
Figure 66: Visa online ad, 2013
TV presence
Figure 67: Visa television ad, 2013
Figure 68: Visa television ad, 2013
Brand analysis: E*TRADE
Online initiatives
Figure 69: E*TRADE online ad, 2013
Figure 70: E*TRADE online ad, 2013
TV/YouTube presence
Figure 71: E*TRADE television ad, 2013
Figure 72: E*TRADE television ad, 2013
Print and other
Direct mail
Figure 73: E*TRADE direct mail ad, 2013
Figure 74: E*TRADE direct mail ad, 2013
Email
Figure 75: E*TRADE email ad, 2013
Figure 76: E*TRADE direct mail ad, 2013
Print
Figure 77: E*TRADE print ad, 2013
Figure 78: E*TRADE print ad, 2013

Attitudes Toward Financial Services Ads
Key points
Figure 79: Attitudes toward financial services ads, by gender, June 2013
Figure 80: Attitudes toward financial services ads, by age, June 2013
Figure 81: Attitudes toward financial services ads, by gender and age, June 2013
Figure 82: Attitudes toward financial services ads, by race, June 2013

Marketing Channels Most Likely to be Noticed
Key points
Figure 83: Marketing channels most likely to be noticed, by gender, June 2013
Figure 84: Marketing channels most likely to be noticed, by age, June 2013
Figure 85: Marketing channels most likely to be noticed, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2013

Influence of Ads on Communication with Companies
Key points
Figure 86: Influence of direct mail/email on communication with financial company, by gender, June 2013
Figure 87: Influence of direct mail/email on communication with financial company, by age, June 2013
Figure 88: Influence of direct mail/email on communication with financial company, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2013

Response to Financial Services Ads
Key points
Figure 89: Method used to respond to financial services ad, by gender, June 2013
Figure 90: Method used to respond to financial services ad, by age, June 2013
Figure 91: Method used to respond to financial services ad, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2013

Interaction with Financial Institutions
Key points
Figure 92: Attitudes and behaviors relating to customer touchpoints, by gender, June 2013
Figure 93: Attitudes and behaviors relating to customer touchpoints, by age, June 2013
Figure 94: Attitudes and behaviors relating to customer touchpoints, by income, June 2013

Interest in Communications from Financial Provider
Key points
Figure 95: Satisfaction with and interest in receiving information via different channels, by type of provider, June 2013
From primary bank
Figure 96: Satisfaction with and interest in receiving information from primary bank via different channels, by gender, June 2013
Figure 97: Satisfaction with and interest in receiving information from primary bank via different channels, by age, June 2013
From primary credit union
Figure 98: Satisfaction with and interest in receiving information from primary credit union via different channels, by gender, June 2013
Figure 99: Satisfaction with and interest in receiving information from primary credit union via different channels, by age, June 2013
From primary credit card provider
Figure 100: Satisfaction with and interest in receiving information from primary credit card provider via different channels, by gender, June 2013
Figure 101: Satisfaction with and interest in receiving information from primary credit card provider via different channels, by age, June 2013
Figure 102: Satisfaction with and interest in receiving information from primary credit card provider via different channels, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2013
From primary insurance company
Figure 103: Satisfaction with and interest in receiving information from primary insurance company via different channels, by age, June 2013
Figure 104: Satisfaction with and interest in receiving information from primary insurance company via different channels, by income, June 2013
Figure 105: Satisfaction with and interest in receiving information from primary insurance company via different channels, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2013

Attitudes Toward Providing Personal Information
Key points
Figure 106: Attitudes toward providing personal information, by gender, June 2013
Figure 107: Attitudes toward providing personal information, by age, June 2013
Figure 108: Attitudes toward providing personal information, by gender and age, June 2013
Figure 109: Attitudes toward providing personal information, by race, June 2013

Call Center Influence on Purchase Behavior
Key points
Figure 110: Incidence of purchase based on information from call center, June 2013

Appendix – Other Useful Consumer Tables
Key points
Ownership of financial products
Figure 111: Financial products owned, by gender, June 2013
Figure 112: Financial products owned, by age, June 2013
Figure 113: Financial products owned, by gender and age, June 2013
Figure 114: Financial products owned, by income, June 2013
Figure 115: Financial products owned, by race/Hispanic origin, June 2013

Appendix – Trade Associations

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