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Black Consumers - Feeding Their Kids - US - October 2016

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Nov 2016

Category :

Baby Products

No. of Pages : N/A

Black parents, especially moms, are the primary decision makers and influencers when it comes to feeding their kids. Food is love and while she is in control when raising her kids, she is soft at heart and likes to give in to what her children want to eat…within reason. Her kids are vocal about what they want and sometimes she will allow her kids to eat their favorites, even if she’s not totally comfortable with their choices or feels they lack nutritional value. Faced with limited resources, especially time with the kids at the dinner table, she is willing to compromise for convenience and practicality rather than change up her recipe repertoire unless it’s easy to do so.

Table of Contents

OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Black parents are relying mostly on themselves to feed the kids
Figure 1: Who is involved in feeding the kids, July 2016
School plays an important role in feeding the kids a nutritious lunch
Figure 2: Participation in the school lunch program, by ethnicity, 2010-11 school year
Environmental and behavioral factors impact parents’ ability to marry convenience with expectations
Figure 3: Characteristics of urban tracts by food desert status, by race, 1990, 2000, and 2005-09
Younger Black parents are more food-involved
Figure 4: Black consumers’ attitudes toward feeding their kids, July 2016
Black parents struggle between giving in to kids’ wants vs providing for needs
Figure 5: Black parents’ perceptions of specific foods, nutritious vs kids love, July 2016
Black parents experience conflict between perception vs reality
Do as I say, not as I do
Figure 6: Attitudes and opinions about food, Black moms vs all moms, index to all moms, February 2015 - March 2016
The opportunities
Showcase updated healthy versions of her favorite recipes
Figure 7: Healthy Soul Food Cooking, 2007
Leverage trusted sources to push nutritional balance vs perfection
Expand audience reach potential by exposing Black children to healthier food choices
What it means

THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Majority of Black families’ food budget spent at home
Environmental and behavioral factors impact what and when children eat
Black children face adverse health issues stemming from food consumption

BLACK FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN – BY THE NUMBERS
Declining birth rate has negligible impact on Black households
Figure 8: Black children under 18 years old and share of total US children, 2008-15
Figure 9: Living arrangements of children under 18 years old, by race/Hispanic origin, 2015
Median household income for Black families with children about 60% of the average
Figure 10: Presence of children under 18 years old, median household income in households with children, by race/Hispanic origin of householder, 2015

MARKET PERSPECTIVE
Food deserts are prevalent in predominately Black neighborhoods
Figure 11: US map of households that live in a food desert, 2009
Figure 12: Characteristics of urban tracts by food desert status, by race, 1990, 2000, and 2005-09
Blacks are more susceptible to food allergies and intolerances
Figure 13: Food allergies reported in the past 12 months for children under age 18 years, by race/ethnicity, 2014
Black children have a greater susceptibility to obesity
Figure 14: Obesity among children and adolescents aged 2–19 years, by age and race/Hispanic origin, 2011-14
Black families are less likely to eat together
Figure 15: Parent had breakfast/dinner with child every day during typical week last month, 2011

MARKET FACTORS
42% of Black children are recipients of free or reduced school lunches
Figure 16: Trends in prevalence rates of food insecurity, by total and by race/Hispanic origin, 1995-2015
Figure 17: Participation in the National School Lunch Program, by race/Hispanic origin, 2010–11 school year
Figure 18: Participation in the National School Lunch Program, 2008-15 
Black households spend a greater percentage of income on food at home
Figure 19: Annual expenditures shares – Food, by food at home and away from home, 2015
Figure 20: Annual expenditure shares – Food at home, by food categories, 2015
Figure 21: Annual expenditures shares – Food, by food at home and away from home, 2014-15

KEY STRATEGIES – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Black children drive meal choice, but moms ultimately decide
Black parents will heed advice from authority figures
Grocery shopping is as much of the feeding process as meal prep

WHAT’S WORKING?
Black parents feel knowledgeable about food nutrition
Government and private company programs combating environmental factors see change

WHAT’S STRUGGLING?
Limited family time leads to kids taking control of meals
School lunch programs mainly help one of three food security groups

WHAT’S NEXT?
Start-up companies creating meal services for schools

THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Black parents struggle between serving convenient vs healthy food
Black parents are comfortable with what their kids eat at school
Everyone in the household eats the same meal, no special orders
Food-Involved parents lean on education vs emotion in feeding kids

FEEDING KIDS ATTITUDINAL SEGMENTS
Figure 22: Black consumers and feeding their kids segments, July 2016
Food-Involved Parents demonstrate strongest concern
Figure 23: Profile of Food-Involved Black parents, July 2016
Authoritative Parents use common sense and involve the kids
Figure 24: Profile of Authoritative Black parents, July 2016
Consultative Parents give greater consideration to kids’ desires
Figure 25: Profile of Consultative Black parents, July 2016
Compliant Parents concede control to their kids
Figure 26: Profile of Compliant Black parents, July 2016

DECISION MAKING IN FEEDING THE CHILDREN
Black parents take the lead in feeding their children
Figure 27: Who is involved in feeding the kids, July 2016
Mom is her most-valued parenting source, except when feeding the kids
Figure 28: Who is involved in feeding the kids – Among Black moms, July 2016
Married couples rely on each other, single moms rely on themselves
Figure 29: Who is involved in feeding the kids, by marital status, July 2016
Parents allow older children greater eating flexibility
Figure 30: Who is involved in feeding the kids, by age of children, July 2016

WHO INFLUENCES FEEDING THE KIDS
Parents are in control, but their children drive meal choices
Figure 31: Influencers for what Black parents feed their kids, July 2016
Dads look to outside sources for meal inspiration
Figure 32: Influencers for what Black parents feed their kids, by gender, July 2016
Upper income households give heed to authority figures
Figure 33: Influencers for what Black parents feed their kids, by household income, July 2016
As children age, their influence on what they eat increases
Figure 34: Influencers for what Black parents feed their kids, by age of children, July 2016

FEEDING THE KIDS DYNAMIC
Kids will ask for their favorites, and sometimes dictate what the entire family eats
Figure 35: Dynamic around Black parents feeding their kids, July 2016
Income across strata impacts kids’ food choices and options
Figure 36: Dynamic around Black parents feeding their kids, by household income, July 2016
What kids eat at school is impacted by age and income
Figure 37: Children take their lunch to school, by work status, education, household income, age of children, 2016

PERCEPTIONS OF TYPES OF FOODS
Processed food rules…but only among kids
Figure 38: Black parents’ perceptions of specific foods, July 2016
Black moms prefer to cook from scratch due to tradition
Frozen food is a taboo in Black households
Figure 39: Frozen snack purchase – Any eaten in household, by all vs Black consumers, January 2016
Kids love processed, but not nutritious food
Figure 40: Black parents’ perceptions of specific foods, nutritious vs kids love, July 2016
Parents are reasonably comfortable feeding kids their favorites
Figure 41: Black parents’ perceptions of specific foods, feels comfortable serving vs kids love, July 2016
Parents are willing to forgo their food concerns for convenience
Figure 42: Perceptions of types of foods, detail by feel comfortable serving and nutritious, July 2016
Black moms want their kids to be better than she is
Figure 43: Attitudes and opinions about food, Black moms vs all moms, index to all moms, February 2015 - March 2016

MAIN CONCERNS FOR FEEDING THEIR KIDS
Consumption of unhealthy ingredients most concerning
Figure 44: Main concerns of Black parents for feeding kids, July 2016
Potential adverse reactions less concerning, even with higher incidence of ailments
Authoritative parents show the greatest concern for their children’s food
Figure 45: Main concerns for feeding kids – Nets, by feeding kids attitudinal segments, July 2016

ATTITUDES TOWARD FEEDING KIDS
Black parents struggle between instilling good eating habits and giving in to kids’ wants
Figure 46: Attitudes toward feeding kids – Any agree, July 2016
Gender differences demonstrated in pleasing vs giving in to kids’ wants
Figure 47: Attitudes toward feeding kids – Indifferent parents, by gender, July 2016
Single parents are not as knowledgeable about food, but they are concerned how their parenting skills are judged
Figure 48: Attitudes toward feeding kids – Vocal/picky kids, Ambivalent parents, by marital status, July 2016
More education impacts involvement and level of permission
Figure 49: Attitudes toward feeding kids – Informed, health-concerned parents, by education, July 2016
Parents of younger children have limited involvement and cave into their kids’ narrow palates
Figure 50: Attitudes toward feeding kids –Informed, health-concerned parents and vocal, picky kids, by age of children, July 2016

APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
Data sources
Consumer survey data
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations
Terms

List of Table

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