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Published on : Mar 16, 2015

If you reside in any of Winnipeg’s neighborhoods, bringing home the bacon, chickpeas, goat, or lentils is going to be a challenge, rather a big challenge. 

While many of the grassroots organizations strive to improve their food security and make the environment a less hungry and more reasonable place to live, the food deserts such as Winnipeg’s west ends and north ends simply exist. This is because governments allow them to exist. 

The NorWest Co-op Community Food Center last week opened free, healthy, lunches three days a week in Canada. The center will foster the community and also promote healthy eating. Although these are admirable goals but they are likely to have major impact on the lives of the people in that neighborhood. 

Hence, thorough education about health food and nutrition is vital. However, it is not going to be easy for those people living in Burrows Avenue to purchase carrots in January. It is entirely on the empowerment of Winnipeg’s council and mayor to utilize their incentives in order to get the grocery stores into the city areas.

In 2013, the councilors of Winnipeg had questioned the executive policy committee to scrutinize the scheme of bring grocery stores into the city areas that lack them. However, the idea was shot down. Although governments willingly give pocket-sized cash to various initiatives, but when it comes to definite strategies to bring food in the most needed places they just hope for the best and offload the responsibility.   

Nevertheless, recently there have been indications that attitudes may be shifting. During the last municipal elections the food policies were immensely debated and the Mayor promised public and annual address to state the food security in Winnipeg.