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Published on : Sep 02, 2014

Results from a latest study indicate that wine only prevents cardiovascular disease in people who engage in regular physical exercise. The study – In Vino Veritas – was presented by Prof. Milos Taborsky at the ESC Congress. 

Prof. Taborsky, from the Czech Republic, said that this was the initial randomized trial that weighs both red and white wine against markers of atherosclerosis (1) among people who face a low to moderate CVD risk. The study revealed that drinking wine in moderation could prevent CVD in those people who exercised regularly. The same results were seen in studies relating to white as well as red wine.

Since the early 1990s, various scientific studies have been accumulating evidence that drinking moderate amounts of wine could prevent CVD. A number of retrospective studies have indicated that the consumption of wine could, in fact, increase the level of HDL, known as the ‘good’ cholesterol. However, what was missing hitherto was a comprehensive, long-term, randomized study to evaluate the effects of white wine and red wine on not just HDL cholesterol, but also on other atherosclerosis markers.

The study comprised of 146 people who were seen to have a risk of CVD in the mild to moderate range. The risk level was measured using the HeartScore (3) scale. Participants of the study were randomized to a full year of moderate wine consumption. They either consumed white wine (Chardonnay Pinot) or red wine (Pinot Noir) produced in the same year. The wine was procured from the Czech Republic’s wine region.

The World Health Organization states that ‘moderate’ wine consumption in women is 0.2 liters and 0.3 liters in men, with no more than five times a week.