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Published on : Dec 17, 2014

Dining is a vibrant, dynamic subject. You can never set down a list of definitive rules for it, and since it depends on our own fickle taste, it is always subject to drastic changes and welcoming to new trends. Here’s a list of dining trends that are on the cusp of becoming mainstream and will surely make that step up in the coming year.

1. Increasing Acceptance of Technology: Technology in dining is not limited to advancements in cookware any more. Restaurants have now started to sell tickets to their meals online, using their inevitable presence on the internet. Canned foods are now common on e-commerce websites such as Amazon, and niche enterprises have started up in many parts of the world to deliver fresh produce on the consumer’s doorstep. Expect the internet to make its increasing presence felt in the field of dining in inventive ways.

2. Increasing Acceptance of Innovation: Honey treated with ghost chilli, hummus flavored with lemongrass, and bourbon flavored with honey and chilli pepper are some of the countless flavor innovations that are becoming increasingly popular. It’s bourgeoisie to simply use an ingredient in the form it is naturally found, and unprecedented combinations of flavors are the latest trend.

3. Increasing Acceptance of Widespread Restless Palate Syndrome: Carrying on from the second point, this refers to the numerous mishmashes concocted by innovative chefs around the world. Our discontent with simple, natural flavors has led us to try out extreme combinations to bring out bold flavors. Coffee-flavored coconut waters, orange-flavored cucumbers, and spicy, all-inclusive beer cocktails are just the tip of the iceberg in this growing trend. The commercialization of the traditional Middle Eastern hummus, which is supposed to be a simple chickpea dip, is a commonly observed example.

Other trends include increasing use of food as medicine, as holistic medicine becomes popular and well-known, and the rise of neurogastronomoy, a nascent field which looks into the question of how we perceive food.