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Published on : Apr 22, 2016

Since decades, bone grafts and substitutes are being used for bone structure regeneration, restoration, and pain relief. Conventionally autografts have been de facto for bone grafting, wherein a patient’s own bone was used as a graft. However, autologous bone grafts are the gold standard for bone transplant. Nevertheless, the utilization of autologous bone grafts involves risk of transfer of infection. This led to the development of allografts that overcome limitations and disadvantages associated with autologous grafts. 

According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation, globally the incidence of fracture among men and women is expected to rise by 310% and 240% respectively by 20250. Growing incidence of fractures and the introduction of new bone grafts and substitutes will propel the bone grafts and substitutes market.

In a recent industry development, Cerapedics, a Colorado-based medical devices company developed FDA-approved bone grafts for cervical spine with the intent to improve spinal fusion procedures. With the introduction of i-Factor bone graft the company aims to improve the fusion level supposed to be attained during spinal fusion procedures in cervical spine. After Medtronic’s In Fuse, i-Factor is next in line bone graft approved by the FDA for improving the lumbar spine.

North America stood as the largest market for bone grafts and substitutes in 2014 followed by Europe. Consistent technological advancements, stringent government regulations, and the increasing focus on patient safety are propelling the North America market for bone grafts and substitutes. Allografts and bone graft substitutes are the product segments of the global market for bone grafts and substitutes. The transition from autografts to allografts due to technological developments is expected to fuel the allograft product segment in the yaers to come.  Bone grafts and substitutes are used in foot and ankle, long bone, joint reconstruction, spinal fusion, dental, and craniomaxillofacial structure of the body.