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Published on : Nov 25, 2013

Women who are in their postmenopausal stage and consume sugar-sweetened beverages have a higher chance of developing endometrial cancer than women who don’t consume the same. These are the findings of a study published in a journal. The journal—titled Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention—is published by the American Association for Cancer Research.

The study, that shows the dose-dependent relationship between estrogen-dependent type I endometrial cancer and sugar-sweetened drinks. This means that the higher the dose (consumption) of sugar-sweetened drinks, the greater the risk of the common endometrial cancer. The study noted that women in their postmenopausal stage who reported the maximum intake of such drinks showed a 78% higher endometrial cancer risk. 

The study was led by Maki Inoue-Choi, Ph.D., M.S., R.D., in the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health of the University of Minnesota’s School of Public Health. According to researchers involved in this study, it is the first to establish a statistics-backed relationship between the intakes of sugar-sweetened beverages and type I estrogen-dependent endometrial cancer. In the past, various research studies have established that a higher consumption of sugar-enhanced drinks lead to higher obesity levels among women, which in turn increases the levels of insulin and estrogen as compared to women who have normal weight. Higher estrogens and insulin levels are known to be risk factors that increase the changes of endometrial cancer.

The study used data collated from 23,039 women in their postmenopausal stage in 1986 before they were diagnosed with cancer. Factors such as dietary intake, demographics, and health records of the women were studied in order to arrive at the conclusion of this research. 

The Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) was used for assessing the dietary intake of the women.