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Published on : Aug 25, 2015

According to recent news in Madison (WKOW), a Monona woman brought sewing machines to Louisiana for 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. The woman has helped the New Orleans community by offering more than a dozen trips to Louisiana. She carried her sewing machines on every trip she visited. 

The Sewing Machine Project started by Margaret Jankowski after the hurricane Katrina hit Asia in 2005. When the tsunami hit the region, she quickly changed the focus. She said, after 18 trips and carrying the sewing machines everywhere to various places besides New Orleans, the machines have always been her favorite. 

The Sewing Machine Project has given more than 900 machines to people in the south affected by Katrina. The project has grown and expanded over the years, way beyond the tsunami relief at this point after a decade, added Margaret. 

 The project deals into providing sewing machines to various community groups and schools. By this means, they preserve the ways of life unfamiliar to those in the Midwest.

The Mardi Gras Indians are truly preserving a rich culture. The sewing in this region is a huge part of that project, added Jankowski. By one look at the ceremonial suits of the people of this region and one would know their need for the sewing machines to keep the culture alive. 

 All the sewing machines that are donated come with a special request. They are basically used to help someone else. Jankowski said that the machines have constantly shared something with someone, taught somebody to sew on their own machine lots of different things. The project is touching hearts of many people across the globe. 

Jankowski is soon planned to leave for that 18th trip to New Orleans and this time she is bringing her 85 machines to enhance the project and help the people sew better.