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Published on : Jul 14, 2015

Carolina Precision Machining Inc. has plans to expand its production as well as workforce by moving into a larger space.  The corporation deals in aerospace industry and makes precision machine parts for aviation, aerospace, and heavy-equipment manufacturers. The company did not disclose its capital funding amount of investment. 
A spokesman for Davie County Economic Development Commission commented that the space in the new building has been configured according to processes of the company. The North Main building will be marketed soon, he added. 

The new building gives the company the opportunity to re-configure the work processes and improve efficiency reducing costs too, added Steve Vick, founder of the company. 

The company is adding new laser equipment and offering materials and services while cutting down on conventional machining processes. The founder also said that laser-beam machining eradicates all the materials without mechanical engagement with the work-piece material. 
The company has 30 employees and plans to add 10 to 25 jobs by the end of 2016. Most of the new jobs involve high-precision, skilled machinists that perform tooling work and high-volume milling and turning. 

The hiring will occur as growth rises and no local incentives will be involved with the expansion. The expansion has spurred by grants from the Davidson County Community College and Northwest Piedmont Workforce Development Board. It has also spurred from North Carolina Community College System. All these grants enabled the company to gain aerospace manufacturing certifications in 2013. 

The AS9100C certification enables CPM to contend on a level with firms that are the sizes of Carolina, added Vick. 

The presidents of the Davie Economic Development Commission added that the company came to a mutual decision to expand locally due to the county’s support of entrepreneurial movements. 

They are taking the initiative and putting people at work. The company is growing, but is still small enough in the global market.