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Published on : Jul 27, 2015

ICAO, the International Civil Aviation Organization, has started investing a complaint that was lodged by Jordan against the construction of an airport led by Israel near Aqaba. The transportation minister of Jordan, Lina Shabib, said in a statement to the daily newspaper of the country al-Ghad that the International Civil Aviation Organization was planning to vote on the matter.

The new airport, to be named Timna, according to Shabib, is very close to the King Hussein international airport of Jordan. King Hussein airport is located in the large coastal Jordanian city Aqaba. According to Jordan’s complaint, the close vicinity of the two airports will affect the aerial frequency of the regional airport and could also lead to accidents. Despite of Jordan’s vocal disagreement with Israel continuing work on the airport, Israel has continued to build it.

Shabib has said that Jordan’s transport and foreign ministries will continue to mitigate the issue through the intervention of international organizations governing aviation and related rules. 
Jordan and Israel had signed a peace agreement in the year 1994 that included the building of several joint infrastructure and economic projects, projects that never really started.

The potential hope of a joint airport also vanished completely in the year 2013 when Israel started the construction of the Timna airport, located nearly 20 kilometers from the Israeli city Eilat and only nearly 10 kilometers from the Jordanian city of Aqaba.

Amin al-Quran, Jordan’s head of the Civil Aviation Regulatory Commission, had told the Israeli media at that time that when Jordan had found about the location of the new airport of Israel, the country realized that there was an issue.

Based on the details Jordan has about the airport, the country states that the plan does not fulfill international code and standards. The distance between King Hussein international airport of Jordan and the one being built by Israel is insufficient and could pose danger to airplanes and passengers on both the sides, the Jordanian minister added.