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Published on : Mar 18, 2015

Inspired by nature, engineers hailing from the University of California located at Berkeley created an unfathomably thin, chameleon kind of a material that can change colors on demand. All you need to do in order to see the magic unfold is apply some amount of force on the material for a minute. 

This newly discovered material that can change colors like a chameleon provides fascinating possibilities for the development of an innovative school of display technologies which will possess the ability to camouflage and shift colors. The sensors will be able to detect the otherwise unrecognizable defects in bridges, aircrafts, and buildings. 

Connie J. Chang-Hasnain, one of the members of the team from Berjeley, commenting on the discovery said, this material is the first of its kind that possess a flexible skin that is typically associated with a chameleon. The material can change its color by simply flexing its skin a little bit. Connie J. Chang-Hasnain is also the co-author of the research study published on Optica, which is a new very popular journal by The Optical Society. 

The researchers could select a wide range of colors that the material would reflect depending on how much it was bent or flexed by etching minute features, which were tinier than light’s wavelength. They etched on the surface of a silicon film, which was in turns was almost thousand times thinner than human hair. What they observed is known as structural color. 

The researchers and scientists across the globe sees this innovation as a path breaking discovery in the field of science that could bring about major changes in the way we view the world. This technique could also help designers worldwide to create colors used in paints and others material without using dyes.