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Published on : Apr 24, 2015

In the start of the new millennium, the international community has made a commitment for achieving universal primary education for all girls and boys. Currently, which is almost 15 years later, the community thinks that there are still some huge gaps among these commitments and the reality.

Across the globe, around 58 million children do not have any access to attend schools, especially in the south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa region. Millions of students fail to become a graduate, or even fail to learn about all the things which they require to participate in society meaningfully.

Capitalizing on the different inabilities of the governments to cope with the rising demands on public learning; many private education providers are almost mushrooming. This is not a progress; however as summons of the governments which have also failed to meet with their obligations and present free, universal and high-quality education across the globe.

Education is basically not a privilege for the rich class and the well-to-do families; it is primarily the birth right of each and every child across the globe. The state must get rid of its responsibility as a regulator and guarantor of the education sector as a basic human entitlement and further as a public cause. The provision of basic education, free of cost, is not only a core obligation of states but also a moral imperative.

Privatization has crippled the belief of education sector as a universal human right and by the way of severe marginalization and exclusion runs counter to the fundamental principles of human rights law. This issue is creating social inequity.