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Published on : Aug 20, 2014

Could chewing gum actually lead to improved academic productivity? A study conducted recently has found that there may possibly be a link between the two, finally making some headway in a decade-old research. The study called ‘The Effects of Gum Chewing on Math Scores in Adolescents’ was led by Craig Johnston from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, and was sponsored by chewing gum making firm Wm Wrigley Jr Company.

The project studied mathematics test scores and grades of 53 students who chewed gum and 58 students who did not. The findings suggest that the teenagers who did chew gum scored better in a standardized math test and final grades were also comparatively better than those students who did not chew gum.

Most U.S. schools have banned chewing gum in classes since students usually dispose it off under desks or chairs. But it is for the first time that somebody has been able to provide some kind of positive connection between chewing gum and better academic performance of teenagers.

Although details of the study were registered on the U.S. government’s website on 2008, a press release with the findings was issued by Wrigley only recently.

After 14 weeks of chewing gum during math classes and while doing homework, students chewing gum had a 3% increase in standardized math test scores, a small although statistically noteworthy change. The findings come at a time when students, parents and teachers are looking to improve academic performance in a highly competitive school environment.