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Published on : Jan 28, 2014

 

The Chinese Commerce Ministry has said on Thursday that the country is set to levy provisional anti-dumping duties on U.S. and Korean imports of solar-grade polysilicon. According to officials, the anti-dumping duty will come into effect from July 24 this year. As part of this decision, Chinese enterprises importing solar-grade polysilicon from the U.S. will have to mandatorily shell out deposit rates to the Chinese customs department. These rates would range anywhere between 53.3% and 57%, and will be decided based on dumping margins. These details were made public via a statement uploaded on the website of the Chinese Commerce Ministry.

Additionally, those enterprises importing solar-grade polysilicon from the Republic of Korea will be obliged to pay up deposit rates to the tune of 2.4% to 48.7%, the statement further added. 

The decision comes after Chinese authorities found that exporters from the ROK and U.S. were indulging in dumping practices, thus harming the domestic Chinese solar industry.

In October 2013, the American government had imposed countervailing and anti-dumping duties on the import of crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells from the Chinese market.

According to the Commerce department, the dumping margins adopted by Chinese manufacturers in the United States’ market ranged from 18.32% to 249.9%, for which these exporters and producers enjoyed countervailable subsidies ranging between 14.78% and 15.97%. The production of solar cells relies heavily on the solar-grade polysilicon material.

In June 2013, the European Union had imposed an anti-dumping duty on an interim basis. This 11.8% duty was levied on nearly every solar panel product imported from China, including products such as wafers, panels and cells.

Currently, both sides are in negotiations so as to prevent the final ruling from coming into effect.