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Published on : Jul 14, 2014

A research study from the University of Cambridge states that one out of three cases of Alzheimer’s disease is preventable. The major risk factors for this disease are smoking, depression, poor education, and lack of exercise.

A research done in 2011 placed the estimate of one in two cases. However, the new research study takes into consideration the overlapping risk factors as well.

The research done in UK for Alzheimer’s stated that the biggest risk factor for the condition was age. However, the study done by the University of Cambridge analyzed data which was population-based to indicate the major risk factors for the condition.

These major risk factors included smoking, low educational attainment, depression, physical inactivity, diabetes, mid-life obesity, and mid-life hypertension.

The researchers indicated that a third of the Alzheimer’s cases were linked to lifestyle factors which could be modified. The researchers also analyzed how reducing these factors could influence the number of cases in the future.

The team found out that by decreasing each risk factor by ten percent, nearly nine million of the total cases of the disorder could be prevented by the year 2050.

Also, in U.K. around 10 percent decrease in the risk factors could contribute to decrease of 8.8 percent or two-hundred thousand cases by the year 2050.

The current estimates indicate that more than 106 million people around the world will be living with Alzheimer’s by the year 2050. This figure is more than three times the total number of people affected in 2010.